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Skin cancer screening behaviours among individuals with a strong family history of malignant melanoma.

Kasparian NA, McLoone JK, Meiser B, Butow PN, Simpson JM, Mann GJ - Br. J. Cancer (2010)

Bottom Line: Further, information-seeking style moderated the relationship between anxiety and SSE (β=1.02, P=0.004).Annual uptake of CSE was associated with doctor recommendation (β=2.21, P<0.0001) and intention to undergo CSE in the future (β=1.19, P=0.001).Improved doctor-patient communication, as well as psycho-education and behavioural support, may be viable means of improving early skin cancer detection behaviours in this high-risk population.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Women's and Children's Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, Kensington, NSW 2052, Australia. N.Kasparian@unsw.edu.au

ABSTRACT

Background: This study examined the prevalence and correlates of skin cancer screening behaviours among individuals at high risk of developing melanoma due to strong family history.

Methods: A total of 120 individuals with a known family-specific CDKN2A mutation (72% response rate) completed a self-report questionnaire assessing annual frequency of skin self-examination (SSE), clinical skin examination (CSE) and a variety of potential demographic, clinical and psychosocial correlates.

Results: In the past 12 months, 50% of participants reported engaging in SSE at least four times, and 43% of participants had undergone at least one CSE. Engagement in SSE was associated with doctor recommendation (β=1.77, P=0.001), confidence in one's ability to perform SSE (β=1.44, P<0.0001), positive beliefs about melanoma treatment (β=0.77, P=0.002) and intention to perform SSE in the future (β=1.69, P<0.0001). These variables accounted for 59% of the variance in SSE behaviour. Further, information-seeking style moderated the relationship between anxiety and SSE (β=1.02, P=0.004). Annual uptake of CSE was associated with doctor recommendation (β=2.21, P<0.0001) and intention to undergo CSE in the future (β=1.19, P=0.001).

Conclusion: In comparison with clinical guidelines, it appears that individuals at high risk of developing melanoma engage in suboptimal levels of skin surveillance. Improved doctor-patient communication, as well as psycho-education and behavioural support, may be viable means of improving early skin cancer detection behaviours in this high-risk population.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Reported frequency of CSEs in the past 12 months, presented separately for those previously affected or unaffected by melanoma.
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fig2: Reported frequency of CSEs in the past 12 months, presented separately for those previously affected or unaffected by melanoma.

Mentions: Figures 1 and 2 illustrate annual frequency of SSE and CSE, respectively; data are presented separately for those previously affected or unaffected by melanoma. Overall, 21% of participants reported performing SSE once per month and 17% reported weekly performance of SSE. In contrast, 15% of participants had not performed SSE at all in the past 12 months and 36% ‘never' or ‘rarely' used a mirror or enlisted the help of another person when performing SSE. Those previously affected by melanoma reported significantly greater engagement in SSE over the past year (mean scale score M=3.39, s.d.=1.34) than unaffected (M=2.67, s.d.=1.31) participants (Z=2.71, P=0.007). Of those who reported not receiving a recommendation for SSE (n=49), 29% had not undertaken any form of SSE in the past 12 months. In terms of CSE behaviours, 43% of participants had engaged in CSE at least once in the past 12 months, with only 17% adhering to the recommended biannual uptake of CSE. The majority of the sample (57%) had no CSE in the past 12 months and 27% of participants never had a CSE. Affected participants (M=1.03 times, s.d.=0.85) reported significantly higher CSE uptake in the past 12 months than unaffected (M=0.48, s.d.=0.89) participants (Z=3.86, P=0.0005). Of those who reported not receiving a recommendation for CSE (n=59), 88% had no CSE in the past 12 months.


Skin cancer screening behaviours among individuals with a strong family history of malignant melanoma.

Kasparian NA, McLoone JK, Meiser B, Butow PN, Simpson JM, Mann GJ - Br. J. Cancer (2010)

Reported frequency of CSEs in the past 12 months, presented separately for those previously affected or unaffected by melanoma.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2990585&req=5

fig2: Reported frequency of CSEs in the past 12 months, presented separately for those previously affected or unaffected by melanoma.
Mentions: Figures 1 and 2 illustrate annual frequency of SSE and CSE, respectively; data are presented separately for those previously affected or unaffected by melanoma. Overall, 21% of participants reported performing SSE once per month and 17% reported weekly performance of SSE. In contrast, 15% of participants had not performed SSE at all in the past 12 months and 36% ‘never' or ‘rarely' used a mirror or enlisted the help of another person when performing SSE. Those previously affected by melanoma reported significantly greater engagement in SSE over the past year (mean scale score M=3.39, s.d.=1.34) than unaffected (M=2.67, s.d.=1.31) participants (Z=2.71, P=0.007). Of those who reported not receiving a recommendation for SSE (n=49), 29% had not undertaken any form of SSE in the past 12 months. In terms of CSE behaviours, 43% of participants had engaged in CSE at least once in the past 12 months, with only 17% adhering to the recommended biannual uptake of CSE. The majority of the sample (57%) had no CSE in the past 12 months and 27% of participants never had a CSE. Affected participants (M=1.03 times, s.d.=0.85) reported significantly higher CSE uptake in the past 12 months than unaffected (M=0.48, s.d.=0.89) participants (Z=3.86, P=0.0005). Of those who reported not receiving a recommendation for CSE (n=59), 88% had no CSE in the past 12 months.

Bottom Line: Further, information-seeking style moderated the relationship between anxiety and SSE (β=1.02, P=0.004).Annual uptake of CSE was associated with doctor recommendation (β=2.21, P<0.0001) and intention to undergo CSE in the future (β=1.19, P=0.001).Improved doctor-patient communication, as well as psycho-education and behavioural support, may be viable means of improving early skin cancer detection behaviours in this high-risk population.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Women's and Children's Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, Kensington, NSW 2052, Australia. N.Kasparian@unsw.edu.au

ABSTRACT

Background: This study examined the prevalence and correlates of skin cancer screening behaviours among individuals at high risk of developing melanoma due to strong family history.

Methods: A total of 120 individuals with a known family-specific CDKN2A mutation (72% response rate) completed a self-report questionnaire assessing annual frequency of skin self-examination (SSE), clinical skin examination (CSE) and a variety of potential demographic, clinical and psychosocial correlates.

Results: In the past 12 months, 50% of participants reported engaging in SSE at least four times, and 43% of participants had undergone at least one CSE. Engagement in SSE was associated with doctor recommendation (β=1.77, P=0.001), confidence in one's ability to perform SSE (β=1.44, P<0.0001), positive beliefs about melanoma treatment (β=0.77, P=0.002) and intention to perform SSE in the future (β=1.69, P<0.0001). These variables accounted for 59% of the variance in SSE behaviour. Further, information-seeking style moderated the relationship between anxiety and SSE (β=1.02, P=0.004). Annual uptake of CSE was associated with doctor recommendation (β=2.21, P<0.0001) and intention to undergo CSE in the future (β=1.19, P=0.001).

Conclusion: In comparison with clinical guidelines, it appears that individuals at high risk of developing melanoma engage in suboptimal levels of skin surveillance. Improved doctor-patient communication, as well as psycho-education and behavioural support, may be viable means of improving early skin cancer detection behaviours in this high-risk population.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus