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Appetitive operant conditioning in mice: heritability and dissociability of training stages.

Malkki HA, Donga LA, de Groot SE, Battaglia FP, NeuroBSIK Mouse Phenomics ConsortiumPennartz CM - Front Behav Neurosci (2010)

Bottom Line: We also computed correlations between successive training stages to study whether learning deficits at an advanced stage of operant conditioning may be dissociated from normal performance in preceding phases of training.Quantitative trait loci mapping revealed suggestive likelihood ratio statistic peaks for initial magazine checking behavior and lever press-NP.These heritable components may reside in different chromosomal areas.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Cognitive and Systems Neuroscience, Center for Neuroscience, Swammerdam Institute for Life Sciences, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands. h.a.i.malkki@uva.nl

ABSTRACT
To study the heritability of different training stages of appetitive operant conditioning, we carried out behavioral screening of 5 standard inbred mouse strains, 28 recombinant-inbred (BxD) mouse lines and their progenitor strains C57BL/6J and DBA/2J. We also computed correlations between successive training stages to study whether learning deficits at an advanced stage of operant conditioning may be dissociated from normal performance in preceding phases of training. The training consisted of two phases: an operant nose poking (NP) phase, in which mice learned to collect a sucrose pellet from a food magazine by NP, and an operant lever press and NP phase, in which mice had to execute a sequence of these two actions to collect a food pellet. As a measure of magazine oriented exploration, we also studied the nose poke entries in the food magazine during the intertrial intervals at the beginning of the first session of the nose poke training phase. We found significantly heritable components in initial magazine checking behavior, operant NP and lever press-NP. Performance levels in these phases were positively correlated, but several individual strains were identified that showed poor lever press-NP while performing well in preceding training stages. Quantitative trait loci mapping revealed suggestive likelihood ratio statistic peaks for initial magazine checking behavior and lever press-NP. These findings indicate that consecutive stages toward more complex operant behavior show significant heritable components, as well as dissociability between stages in specific mouse strains. These heritable components may reside in different chromosomal areas.

No MeSH data available.


QTL maps for lever press–nose poke performance (A) QTL map for lever press–nose poke performance in the fifth session of training. LRS reaches suggestive threshold on chromosome 9. (B) QTL map for lever press–nose poke performance in the fifth session of training, zoomed in on chromosome 9. LRS peak is situated around 58 MB. The abscissa runs from 0 to 124 megabases.
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Figure 5: QTL maps for lever press–nose poke performance (A) QTL map for lever press–nose poke performance in the fifth session of training. LRS reaches suggestive threshold on chromosome 9. (B) QTL map for lever press–nose poke performance in the fifth session of training, zoomed in on chromosome 9. LRS peak is situated around 58 MB. The abscissa runs from 0 to 124 megabases.

Mentions: QTL mapping of lever press–nose poke performance in the last session of training resulted in a suggestive peak on chromosome 9 (58 MB; Figure 5). Normalizing lever press–nose poke performance on the total number of nose pokes in the preceding phase did not cause a notable change in the location or significance of the LRS. Due to the relative flatness of the peak combined with a high number of genes situated under the peak area being expressed in the mouse central nervous system, it was not feasible to point out a single candidate gene for this final stage of operant learning. Genes found under the peak are listed in Table 2.


Appetitive operant conditioning in mice: heritability and dissociability of training stages.

Malkki HA, Donga LA, de Groot SE, Battaglia FP, NeuroBSIK Mouse Phenomics ConsortiumPennartz CM - Front Behav Neurosci (2010)

QTL maps for lever press–nose poke performance (A) QTL map for lever press–nose poke performance in the fifth session of training. LRS reaches suggestive threshold on chromosome 9. (B) QTL map for lever press–nose poke performance in the fifth session of training, zoomed in on chromosome 9. LRS peak is situated around 58 MB. The abscissa runs from 0 to 124 megabases.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2990458&req=5

Figure 5: QTL maps for lever press–nose poke performance (A) QTL map for lever press–nose poke performance in the fifth session of training. LRS reaches suggestive threshold on chromosome 9. (B) QTL map for lever press–nose poke performance in the fifth session of training, zoomed in on chromosome 9. LRS peak is situated around 58 MB. The abscissa runs from 0 to 124 megabases.
Mentions: QTL mapping of lever press–nose poke performance in the last session of training resulted in a suggestive peak on chromosome 9 (58 MB; Figure 5). Normalizing lever press–nose poke performance on the total number of nose pokes in the preceding phase did not cause a notable change in the location or significance of the LRS. Due to the relative flatness of the peak combined with a high number of genes situated under the peak area being expressed in the mouse central nervous system, it was not feasible to point out a single candidate gene for this final stage of operant learning. Genes found under the peak are listed in Table 2.

Bottom Line: We also computed correlations between successive training stages to study whether learning deficits at an advanced stage of operant conditioning may be dissociated from normal performance in preceding phases of training.Quantitative trait loci mapping revealed suggestive likelihood ratio statistic peaks for initial magazine checking behavior and lever press-NP.These heritable components may reside in different chromosomal areas.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Cognitive and Systems Neuroscience, Center for Neuroscience, Swammerdam Institute for Life Sciences, University of Amsterdam, Amsterdam, Netherlands. h.a.i.malkki@uva.nl

ABSTRACT
To study the heritability of different training stages of appetitive operant conditioning, we carried out behavioral screening of 5 standard inbred mouse strains, 28 recombinant-inbred (BxD) mouse lines and their progenitor strains C57BL/6J and DBA/2J. We also computed correlations between successive training stages to study whether learning deficits at an advanced stage of operant conditioning may be dissociated from normal performance in preceding phases of training. The training consisted of two phases: an operant nose poking (NP) phase, in which mice learned to collect a sucrose pellet from a food magazine by NP, and an operant lever press and NP phase, in which mice had to execute a sequence of these two actions to collect a food pellet. As a measure of magazine oriented exploration, we also studied the nose poke entries in the food magazine during the intertrial intervals at the beginning of the first session of the nose poke training phase. We found significantly heritable components in initial magazine checking behavior, operant NP and lever press-NP. Performance levels in these phases were positively correlated, but several individual strains were identified that showed poor lever press-NP while performing well in preceding training stages. Quantitative trait loci mapping revealed suggestive likelihood ratio statistic peaks for initial magazine checking behavior and lever press-NP. These findings indicate that consecutive stages toward more complex operant behavior show significant heritable components, as well as dissociability between stages in specific mouse strains. These heritable components may reside in different chromosomal areas.

No MeSH data available.