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"Stay tuned": inter-individual neural synchronization during mutual gaze and joint attention.

Saito DN, Tanabe HC, Izuma K, Hayashi MJ, Morito Y, Komeda H, Uchiyama H, Kosaka H, Okazawa H, Fujibayashi Y, Sadato N - Front Integr Neurosci (2010)

Bottom Line: Averted gaze activated the bilateral occipital pole extending to the right posterior superior temporal sulcus, the dorso-medial prefrontal cortex, and the bilateral inferior frontal gyrus.After all the task-related effects were modeled out, inter-individual correlation analysis of residual time-courses was performed.Paired subjects showed more prominent correlations than non-paired subjects in the right inferior frontal gyrus, suggesting that this region is involved in sharing intention during eye contact that provides the context for joint attention.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Cerebral Integration, Department of Cerebral Research, National Institute for Physiological Sciences Okazaki, Aichi, Japan.

ABSTRACT
Eye contact provides a communicative link between humans, prompting joint attention. As spontaneous brain activity might have an important role in the coordination of neuronal processing within the brain, their inter-subject synchronization might occur during eye contact. To test this, we conducted simultaneous functional MRI in pairs of adults. Eye contact was maintained at baseline while the subjects engaged in real-time gaze exchange in a joint attention task. Averted gaze activated the bilateral occipital pole extending to the right posterior superior temporal sulcus, the dorso-medial prefrontal cortex, and the bilateral inferior frontal gyrus. Following a partner's gaze toward an object activated the left intraparietal sulcus. After all the task-related effects were modeled out, inter-individual correlation analysis of residual time-courses was performed. Paired subjects showed more prominent correlations than non-paired subjects in the right inferior frontal gyrus, suggesting that this region is involved in sharing intention during eye contact that provides the context for joint attention.

No MeSH data available.


Cueing × sharing interaction. Activation by the contrast of (ES′ − EN′) − (BS′ − BN′) is superimposed on the parasagittal (A), axial (B), and coronal (C) sections of high-resolution MR images intersected at (−28, −68, 46), corresponding to the left IPS. The color scale indicates the t-values. (D) The task-related activation of each condition is compared with the control condition, with the same format as shown in Figure 4.
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Figure 5: Cueing × sharing interaction. Activation by the contrast of (ES′ − EN′) − (BS′ − BN′) is superimposed on the parasagittal (A), axial (B), and coronal (C) sections of high-resolution MR images intersected at (−28, −68, 46), corresponding to the left IPS. The color scale indicates the t-values. (D) The task-related activation of each condition is compared with the control condition, with the same format as shown in Figure 4.

Mentions: Regarding the neural activation, the main effects of eye cueing by means of the contrast of (ES′ + EN′) − (BS′ + BN′) were found in the visual cortices including the bilateral occipital pole, the right MT/V5 extending to the fusiform gyrus, the middle temporal gyrus, and the right pSTS (Figure 4; Table 1). The eye-cueing effect was also observed in the posterior rostral medial frontal cortex (prMFC), and the bilateral inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), more prominently in the right hemisphere. The interaction between eye movement and the sharing of attention toward the object by means of the contrast of (ES′ − EN′) − (BS′ − BN′) was found in the left intraparietal sulcus (IPS) (Figure 5; Table 2).


"Stay tuned": inter-individual neural synchronization during mutual gaze and joint attention.

Saito DN, Tanabe HC, Izuma K, Hayashi MJ, Morito Y, Komeda H, Uchiyama H, Kosaka H, Okazawa H, Fujibayashi Y, Sadato N - Front Integr Neurosci (2010)

Cueing × sharing interaction. Activation by the contrast of (ES′ − EN′) − (BS′ − BN′) is superimposed on the parasagittal (A), axial (B), and coronal (C) sections of high-resolution MR images intersected at (−28, −68, 46), corresponding to the left IPS. The color scale indicates the t-values. (D) The task-related activation of each condition is compared with the control condition, with the same format as shown in Figure 4.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2990457&req=5

Figure 5: Cueing × sharing interaction. Activation by the contrast of (ES′ − EN′) − (BS′ − BN′) is superimposed on the parasagittal (A), axial (B), and coronal (C) sections of high-resolution MR images intersected at (−28, −68, 46), corresponding to the left IPS. The color scale indicates the t-values. (D) The task-related activation of each condition is compared with the control condition, with the same format as shown in Figure 4.
Mentions: Regarding the neural activation, the main effects of eye cueing by means of the contrast of (ES′ + EN′) − (BS′ + BN′) were found in the visual cortices including the bilateral occipital pole, the right MT/V5 extending to the fusiform gyrus, the middle temporal gyrus, and the right pSTS (Figure 4; Table 1). The eye-cueing effect was also observed in the posterior rostral medial frontal cortex (prMFC), and the bilateral inferior frontal gyrus (IFG), more prominently in the right hemisphere. The interaction between eye movement and the sharing of attention toward the object by means of the contrast of (ES′ − EN′) − (BS′ − BN′) was found in the left intraparietal sulcus (IPS) (Figure 5; Table 2).

Bottom Line: Averted gaze activated the bilateral occipital pole extending to the right posterior superior temporal sulcus, the dorso-medial prefrontal cortex, and the bilateral inferior frontal gyrus.After all the task-related effects were modeled out, inter-individual correlation analysis of residual time-courses was performed.Paired subjects showed more prominent correlations than non-paired subjects in the right inferior frontal gyrus, suggesting that this region is involved in sharing intention during eye contact that provides the context for joint attention.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Cerebral Integration, Department of Cerebral Research, National Institute for Physiological Sciences Okazaki, Aichi, Japan.

ABSTRACT
Eye contact provides a communicative link between humans, prompting joint attention. As spontaneous brain activity might have an important role in the coordination of neuronal processing within the brain, their inter-subject synchronization might occur during eye contact. To test this, we conducted simultaneous functional MRI in pairs of adults. Eye contact was maintained at baseline while the subjects engaged in real-time gaze exchange in a joint attention task. Averted gaze activated the bilateral occipital pole extending to the right posterior superior temporal sulcus, the dorso-medial prefrontal cortex, and the bilateral inferior frontal gyrus. Following a partner's gaze toward an object activated the left intraparietal sulcus. After all the task-related effects were modeled out, inter-individual correlation analysis of residual time-courses was performed. Paired subjects showed more prominent correlations than non-paired subjects in the right inferior frontal gyrus, suggesting that this region is involved in sharing intention during eye contact that provides the context for joint attention.

No MeSH data available.