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Malignant phyllodes tumour with liposarcomatous differentiation, invasive tubular carcinoma, and ductal and lobular carcinoma in situ: case report and review of the literature.

Abdul Aziz M, Sullivan F, Kerin MJ, Callagy G - Patholog Res Int (2010)

Bottom Line: Carcinoma is more commonly found within the confines of benign PTs; whereas it is more often found surrounding the PT or in the contralateral breast in malignant PTs.The aetiology of co-existing carcinoma is unclear but the rarity of previous radiotherapy treatment suggests that it is incidental.This case highlights the diverse pathology that can occur with PTs, which should be considered when evaluating pathology specimens as they may impact on patient management.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Anatomic Pathology, Galway University Hospitals, Galway, Ireland.

ABSTRACT
A 43-year-old woman presented with a right breast lump that had enlarged over 5 months. She had chemoradiotherapy for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in 1989. Histology revealed a malignant phyllodes tumour (PT) with liposarcomatous differentiation and ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) within the tumour with invasive tubular carcinoma, DCIS, and lobular carcinoma in situ in the surrounding breast. She had surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy. One year follow-up showed no recurrence or metastatic disease. Liposarcomatous differentiation is uncommon in PTs, and coexisting carcinoma is rare with 38 cases in 31 reports in the literature. Carcinoma is reported in malignant (n = 19), benign (n = 16) and in borderline PTs (n = 3) with invasive carcinoma (n = 18) and pure in situ carcinoma (n = 19) recorded in equal frequency. Carcinoma is more commonly found within the confines of benign PTs; whereas it is more often found surrounding the PT or in the contralateral breast in malignant PTs. Previous radiotherapy treatment is reported in only two cases. The aetiology of co-existing carcinoma is unclear but the rarity of previous radiotherapy treatment suggests that it is incidental. This case highlights the diverse pathology that can occur with PTs, which should be considered when evaluating pathology specimens as they may impact on patient management.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Mammogram of the left breast. A relatively well-circumscribed mass was present in lower central aspect of the breast.
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fig1: Mammogram of the left breast. A relatively well-circumscribed mass was present in lower central aspect of the breast.

Mentions: A 43-year-old woman presented with a palpable lump in the central aspect of the left breast below the nipple. The lump was present for five months. It had increased in size over that time and was tender. Mammography showed a relatively well-circumscribed 3.4 cm mass in the lower central aspect of the breast (Figure 1). An ultrasound-guided biopsy was performed and showed a fibroepithelial lesion with increased stromal cellularity and nuclear atypia, consistent with a PT. The patient had a history of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma involving the lumbar spine in 1989, which was treated with chemotherapy and radiotherapy to the lumbar area.


Malignant phyllodes tumour with liposarcomatous differentiation, invasive tubular carcinoma, and ductal and lobular carcinoma in situ: case report and review of the literature.

Abdul Aziz M, Sullivan F, Kerin MJ, Callagy G - Patholog Res Int (2010)

Mammogram of the left breast. A relatively well-circumscribed mass was present in lower central aspect of the breast.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2990446&req=5

fig1: Mammogram of the left breast. A relatively well-circumscribed mass was present in lower central aspect of the breast.
Mentions: A 43-year-old woman presented with a palpable lump in the central aspect of the left breast below the nipple. The lump was present for five months. It had increased in size over that time and was tender. Mammography showed a relatively well-circumscribed 3.4 cm mass in the lower central aspect of the breast (Figure 1). An ultrasound-guided biopsy was performed and showed a fibroepithelial lesion with increased stromal cellularity and nuclear atypia, consistent with a PT. The patient had a history of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma involving the lumbar spine in 1989, which was treated with chemotherapy and radiotherapy to the lumbar area.

Bottom Line: Carcinoma is more commonly found within the confines of benign PTs; whereas it is more often found surrounding the PT or in the contralateral breast in malignant PTs.The aetiology of co-existing carcinoma is unclear but the rarity of previous radiotherapy treatment suggests that it is incidental.This case highlights the diverse pathology that can occur with PTs, which should be considered when evaluating pathology specimens as they may impact on patient management.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Division of Anatomic Pathology, Galway University Hospitals, Galway, Ireland.

ABSTRACT
A 43-year-old woman presented with a right breast lump that had enlarged over 5 months. She had chemoradiotherapy for non-Hodgkin's lymphoma in 1989. Histology revealed a malignant phyllodes tumour (PT) with liposarcomatous differentiation and ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) within the tumour with invasive tubular carcinoma, DCIS, and lobular carcinoma in situ in the surrounding breast. She had surgery and adjuvant radiotherapy. One year follow-up showed no recurrence or metastatic disease. Liposarcomatous differentiation is uncommon in PTs, and coexisting carcinoma is rare with 38 cases in 31 reports in the literature. Carcinoma is reported in malignant (n = 19), benign (n = 16) and in borderline PTs (n = 3) with invasive carcinoma (n = 18) and pure in situ carcinoma (n = 19) recorded in equal frequency. Carcinoma is more commonly found within the confines of benign PTs; whereas it is more often found surrounding the PT or in the contralateral breast in malignant PTs. Previous radiotherapy treatment is reported in only two cases. The aetiology of co-existing carcinoma is unclear but the rarity of previous radiotherapy treatment suggests that it is incidental. This case highlights the diverse pathology that can occur with PTs, which should be considered when evaluating pathology specimens as they may impact on patient management.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus