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Biology of the Chalcid Wasp, Megastimus wachtli , and Its Relationship to Colonization of Cypress Seeds by the Tortricid Moth, Pseudococcyx tessulatana , in Algeria

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ABSTRACT

The biology of Megastimus wachtli Seitner (Hymenoptera: Torymidae) was found to be similar to other species of Megastigmus. During the period of flight that lasted six weeks from the beginning of September to mid-October, M. wachtli laid eggs in cypress (Cupressus sempervirens L., Pinales: Cupressaceae) cones and showed preferences for oviposition on particular sites on cones. M. wachtli has a high potential for colonization because it has evolutionary advantages due to its developmental possibilities including its capacity for parthenogenesis, its fecundity and longevity. It generally did not attack cones colonized by the torticid moth, Pseudococcyx tessulatana (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae). The competition between these species for use of cypress cones suggests that they use different strategies for different species of cypress. The number of insects that could develop relative to the number of cones available also varies between species of cypress.

No MeSH data available.


Emergence of males and females of Megastigmus wachtli from seeds of Cupressus sempervirens collected in autumn of 1998 (number of collected cones = 140) in a natural stand of Baïnem. Drawn according to Camus (1914).
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f02: Emergence of males and females of Megastigmus wachtli from seeds of Cupressus sempervirens collected in autumn of 1998 (number of collected cones = 140) in a natural stand of Baïnem. Drawn according to Camus (1914).

Mentions: The emergence of M. wachtli was spread out over 6 weeks from the beginning of September to mid-October (Figure 2). Emergence of males was earlier as 50% of males emerged before the 21st of September compared to the 23rd of September for 50% of females. These emergences were later than those observed in the natural sites in Greece and in France but earlier than those of Tunisia (Roques et al. 1998).


Biology of the Chalcid Wasp, Megastimus wachtli , and Its Relationship to Colonization of Cypress Seeds by the Tortricid Moth, Pseudococcyx tessulatana , in Algeria
Emergence of males and females of Megastigmus wachtli from seeds of Cupressus sempervirens collected in autumn of 1998 (number of collected cones = 140) in a natural stand of Baïnem. Drawn according to Camus (1914).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2990338&req=5

f02: Emergence of males and females of Megastigmus wachtli from seeds of Cupressus sempervirens collected in autumn of 1998 (number of collected cones = 140) in a natural stand of Baïnem. Drawn according to Camus (1914).
Mentions: The emergence of M. wachtli was spread out over 6 weeks from the beginning of September to mid-October (Figure 2). Emergence of males was earlier as 50% of males emerged before the 21st of September compared to the 23rd of September for 50% of females. These emergences were later than those observed in the natural sites in Greece and in France but earlier than those of Tunisia (Roques et al. 1998).

View Article: PubMed Central

ABSTRACT

The biology of Megastimus wachtli Seitner (Hymenoptera: Torymidae) was found to be similar to other species of Megastigmus. During the period of flight that lasted six weeks from the beginning of September to mid-October, M. wachtli laid eggs in cypress (Cupressus sempervirens L., Pinales: Cupressaceae) cones and showed preferences for oviposition on particular sites on cones. M. wachtli has a high potential for colonization because it has evolutionary advantages due to its developmental possibilities including its capacity for parthenogenesis, its fecundity and longevity. It generally did not attack cones colonized by the torticid moth, Pseudococcyx tessulatana (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae). The competition between these species for use of cypress cones suggests that they use different strategies for different species of cypress. The number of insects that could develop relative to the number of cones available also varies between species of cypress.

No MeSH data available.