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Trapping Phyllophaga spp. (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Melolonthinae) in the United States and Canada using sex attractants.

Robbins PS, Alm SR, Armstrong C, Averill AL, Baker TC, Bauernfiend RJ, Baxendale FP, Braman SK, Brandenburg RL, Cash DB, Couch GJ, Cowles RS, Crocker RL, DeLamar ZD, Dittl TG, Fitzpatrick SM, Flanders KL, Forgatsch T, Gibb TJ, Gill BD, Gilrein DO, Gorsuch CS, Hammond AM, Hastings PD, Held DW, Heller PR, Hiskes RT, Holliman JL, Hudson WG, Klein MG, Krischik VL, Lee DJ, Linn CE, Luce NJ, MacKenzie KE, Mannion CM, Polavarapu S, Potter DA, Roelofs WL, Royals BM, Salsbury GA, Schiff NM, Shetlar DJ, Skinner M, Sparks BL, Sutschek JA, Sutschek TP, Swier SR, Sylvia MM, Vickers NJ, Vittum PJ, Weidman R, Weber DC, Williamson RC, Villani MG - J. Insect Sci. (2006)

Bottom Line: Three major findings included: (1) widespread use of the two compounds [of the 147 Phyllophaga (sensu stricto) species found in the United States and Canada, males of nearly 40% were captured]; (2) in most species intraspecific male response to the pheromone blends was stable between years and over geography; and (3) an unusual pheromone polymorphism was described from P. anxia.At additional locations, the L-valine methyl ester-responding populations and the L-isoleucine methyl ester-responding populations were both present, producing a bimodal capture curve.In southeastern Massachusetts and in Rhode Island, in the United States, P. anxia males were captured with blends of L-valine methyl ester and L-isoleucine methyl ester.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Cornell University, New York State Agriculture Experiment Station, Geneva, NY, USA. psr1@cornell.edu

ABSTRACT
The sex pheromone of the scarab beetle, Phyllophaga anxia, is a blend of the methyl esters of two amino acids, L-valine and L-isoleucine. A field trapping study was conducted, deploying different blends of the two compounds at 59 locations in the United States and Canada. More than 57,000 males of 61 Phyllophaga species (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Melolonthinae) were captured and identified. Three major findings included: (1) widespread use of the two compounds [of the 147 Phyllophaga (sensu stricto) species found in the United States and Canada, males of nearly 40% were captured]; (2) in most species intraspecific male response to the pheromone blends was stable between years and over geography; and (3) an unusual pheromone polymorphism was described from P. anxia. Populations at some locations were captured with L-valine methyl ester alone, whereas populations at other locations were captured with L-isoleucine methyl ester alone. At additional locations, the L-valine methyl ester-responding populations and the L-isoleucine methyl ester-responding populations were both present, producing a bimodal capture curve. In southeastern Massachusetts and in Rhode Island, in the United States, P. anxia males were captured with blends of L-valine methyl ester and L-isoleucine methyl ester.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

P. gracilis var angulata• = catch sites, n = 6 beetlesShaded areas = distributions from Luginbill and Painter, 1953
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i1536-2442-6-39-1-f30: P. gracilis var angulata• = catch sites, n = 6 beetlesShaded areas = distributions from Luginbill and Painter, 1953

Mentions: Most captures of Phyllophaga species recorded during this study were found within the geographical species distributions reported by Luginbill and Painter (1953). There are, however, several range extensions to report. The following species were found in locations in addition to those reported by Luginbill and Painter: P. curialis (Figure 14), P. drakei (Figure 17), P. forbesi (Figure 20), P. foxii (Figure 22), P. futilis (Figure 25), P. gracilis (Figure 29), P. gracilis var. angulata (Figure 30), P. hirtiventris (Figure 33), P. longispina (Figure 40), P. lota (Figure 41), P. marginalis (Figure 43), P. (fraterna) mississippiensis (Figure 46), P. postrema (Figure 50), P. praetermissa (Figure 51), P. quercus (Figure 53), and P. taxodii (Figure 59). Riley (1988) had previously noted range extensions of P. forbesi, P. quercus, and P. taxodii into Louisiana.


Trapping Phyllophaga spp. (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Melolonthinae) in the United States and Canada using sex attractants.

Robbins PS, Alm SR, Armstrong C, Averill AL, Baker TC, Bauernfiend RJ, Baxendale FP, Braman SK, Brandenburg RL, Cash DB, Couch GJ, Cowles RS, Crocker RL, DeLamar ZD, Dittl TG, Fitzpatrick SM, Flanders KL, Forgatsch T, Gibb TJ, Gill BD, Gilrein DO, Gorsuch CS, Hammond AM, Hastings PD, Held DW, Heller PR, Hiskes RT, Holliman JL, Hudson WG, Klein MG, Krischik VL, Lee DJ, Linn CE, Luce NJ, MacKenzie KE, Mannion CM, Polavarapu S, Potter DA, Roelofs WL, Royals BM, Salsbury GA, Schiff NM, Shetlar DJ, Skinner M, Sparks BL, Sutschek JA, Sutschek TP, Swier SR, Sylvia MM, Vickers NJ, Vittum PJ, Weidman R, Weber DC, Williamson RC, Villani MG - J. Insect Sci. (2006)

P. gracilis var angulata• = catch sites, n = 6 beetlesShaded areas = distributions from Luginbill and Painter, 1953
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2990335&req=5

i1536-2442-6-39-1-f30: P. gracilis var angulata• = catch sites, n = 6 beetlesShaded areas = distributions from Luginbill and Painter, 1953
Mentions: Most captures of Phyllophaga species recorded during this study were found within the geographical species distributions reported by Luginbill and Painter (1953). There are, however, several range extensions to report. The following species were found in locations in addition to those reported by Luginbill and Painter: P. curialis (Figure 14), P. drakei (Figure 17), P. forbesi (Figure 20), P. foxii (Figure 22), P. futilis (Figure 25), P. gracilis (Figure 29), P. gracilis var. angulata (Figure 30), P. hirtiventris (Figure 33), P. longispina (Figure 40), P. lota (Figure 41), P. marginalis (Figure 43), P. (fraterna) mississippiensis (Figure 46), P. postrema (Figure 50), P. praetermissa (Figure 51), P. quercus (Figure 53), and P. taxodii (Figure 59). Riley (1988) had previously noted range extensions of P. forbesi, P. quercus, and P. taxodii into Louisiana.

Bottom Line: Three major findings included: (1) widespread use of the two compounds [of the 147 Phyllophaga (sensu stricto) species found in the United States and Canada, males of nearly 40% were captured]; (2) in most species intraspecific male response to the pheromone blends was stable between years and over geography; and (3) an unusual pheromone polymorphism was described from P. anxia.At additional locations, the L-valine methyl ester-responding populations and the L-isoleucine methyl ester-responding populations were both present, producing a bimodal capture curve.In southeastern Massachusetts and in Rhode Island, in the United States, P. anxia males were captured with blends of L-valine methyl ester and L-isoleucine methyl ester.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Cornell University, New York State Agriculture Experiment Station, Geneva, NY, USA. psr1@cornell.edu

ABSTRACT
The sex pheromone of the scarab beetle, Phyllophaga anxia, is a blend of the methyl esters of two amino acids, L-valine and L-isoleucine. A field trapping study was conducted, deploying different blends of the two compounds at 59 locations in the United States and Canada. More than 57,000 males of 61 Phyllophaga species (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Melolonthinae) were captured and identified. Three major findings included: (1) widespread use of the two compounds [of the 147 Phyllophaga (sensu stricto) species found in the United States and Canada, males of nearly 40% were captured]; (2) in most species intraspecific male response to the pheromone blends was stable between years and over geography; and (3) an unusual pheromone polymorphism was described from P. anxia. Populations at some locations were captured with L-valine methyl ester alone, whereas populations at other locations were captured with L-isoleucine methyl ester alone. At additional locations, the L-valine methyl ester-responding populations and the L-isoleucine methyl ester-responding populations were both present, producing a bimodal capture curve. In southeastern Massachusetts and in Rhode Island, in the United States, P. anxia males were captured with blends of L-valine methyl ester and L-isoleucine methyl ester.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus