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Thysanoptera (thrips) within citrus orchards in Florida: species distribution, relative and seasonal abundance within trees, and species on vines and ground cover plants.

Childers CC, Nakahara S - J. Insect Sci. (2006)

Bottom Line: Seven citrus orchards on reduced to no pesticide spray programs were sampled for Thysanoptera in central and south central Florida.In comparison, the following five thrips species were most abundant on vines or ground cover plants: F. bispinosa, H. gowdeyi, F. cephalica, M. abdominalis, and F. gossypiana.Fifty-eight species of vines or ground cover plants in 26 families were infested with one or more of 27 species of thrips.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Entomology and Nematology, University of Florida, Citrus Research and Education Center, 700 Experiment Station Road, Lake Alfred, FL 33850, USA. ccc@crec.ifas.ufl.edu

ABSTRACT
Seven citrus orchards on reduced to no pesticide spray programs were sampled for Thysanoptera in central and south central Florida. Inner and outer canopy leaves, fruits, twigs, trunk scrapings, vines and ground cover plants were sampled monthly between January 1995 and January 1996. Thirty-six species of thrips were identified from 2,979 specimens collected from within citrus tree canopies and 18,266 specimens from vines and ground cover plants within the seven citrus orchards. The thrips species included seven predators [Aleurodothrips fasciapennis (Franklin), Karnyothrips flavipes (Jones), K. melaleucus (Bagnall), Leptothrips cassiae (Watson), L. macroocellatus (Watson), L. pini (Watson), and Scolothrips sexmaculatus (Pergande)] 21 plant feeding species [Anaphothrips n. sp., Arorathrips mexicanus (Crawford), Aurantothrips orchidaceous (Bagnall), Baileyothrips limbatus (Hood), Chaetanaphothrips orchidii (Moulton), Danothrips trifasciatus (Sakimura), Echinothrips americanus (Morgan), Frankliniella bispinosa (Morgan), F. cephalica (Crawford), F. fusca (Hinds), F. gossypiana (Hood), Frankliniella sp. (runneri group), Haplothrips gowdeyi (Franklin), Heliothrips haemorrhoidalis (Bouché), Leucothrips piercei (Morgan), Microcephalothrips abdominalis (Crawford), Neohydatothrips floridanus (Watson), N. portoricensis (Morgan), Pseudothrips inequalis (Beach), Scirtothrips sp., and Thrips hawaiiensis (Morgan)]; and eight fungivorous feeding species [Adraneothrips decorus (Hood), Hoplandrothrips pergandei (Hinds), Idolothripinae sp., Merothrips floridensis (Watson), M. morgani (Hood), Neurothrips magnafemoralis (Hinds), Stephanothrips occidentalis Hood and Williams, and Symphyothrips sp.]. Only F. bispinosa, C. orchidii, D. trifasciatus, and H. haemorrhoidalis have been considered economic pests on Florida citrus. Scirtothrips sp. and T. hawaiiensis were recovered in low numbers within Florida citrus orchards. Both are potential pest species to citrus and possibly other crops in Florida. The five most abundant thrips species collected within citrus tree canopies were: A. fasciapennis, F. bispinosa, C. orchidii, K. flavipes, and D. trifasciatus. In comparison, the following five thrips species were most abundant on vines or ground cover plants: F. bispinosa, H. gowdeyi, F. cephalica, M. abdominalis, and F. gossypiana. Fifty-eight species of vines or ground cover plants in 26 families were infested with one or more of 27 species of thrips.

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Seasonal frequency distributions of three phytophagous pest thrips species on Florida citrus in seven citrus orchard sites in central and south-central Florida during 1995–1996.
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f02: Seasonal frequency distributions of three phytophagous pest thrips species on Florida citrus in seven citrus orchard sites in central and south-central Florida during 1995–1996.

Mentions: Thompson (1939) first reported C. orchidii as a pest on grapefruit in Florida. The orchid thrips is one of three species in Florida that feed where clustered fruit begin to touch, beginning in early May. Mostly red grapefruit varieties, and to a lesser extent white grapefruit, and occasionally round orange varieties such as ‘Valencia’ or ‘Hamlin’, are affected by C. orchidii, D. trifasciatus, and the greenhouse thrips, H. haemorrhoidalis. Damage resulting from their feeding can occur from onset of grapefruit beginning to touch until the fruit are harvested (Childers and Frantz 1994). This survey found 448 C. orchidii (65%), 159 D. trifasciatus (23%), and 85 H. haemorrhoidalis (12 %). C. orchidii was present throughout the season in the citrus orchards and most abundant during the fall months of October and November (Figure 2). Re-infestation of maturing clustered citrus fruits can occur with movement of this thrips pest from alternate hosts including many weed species occurring within citrus orchards to maturing clustered fruits throughout the season.


Thysanoptera (thrips) within citrus orchards in Florida: species distribution, relative and seasonal abundance within trees, and species on vines and ground cover plants.

Childers CC, Nakahara S - J. Insect Sci. (2006)

Seasonal frequency distributions of three phytophagous pest thrips species on Florida citrus in seven citrus orchard sites in central and south-central Florida during 1995–1996.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2990331&req=5

f02: Seasonal frequency distributions of three phytophagous pest thrips species on Florida citrus in seven citrus orchard sites in central and south-central Florida during 1995–1996.
Mentions: Thompson (1939) first reported C. orchidii as a pest on grapefruit in Florida. The orchid thrips is one of three species in Florida that feed where clustered fruit begin to touch, beginning in early May. Mostly red grapefruit varieties, and to a lesser extent white grapefruit, and occasionally round orange varieties such as ‘Valencia’ or ‘Hamlin’, are affected by C. orchidii, D. trifasciatus, and the greenhouse thrips, H. haemorrhoidalis. Damage resulting from their feeding can occur from onset of grapefruit beginning to touch until the fruit are harvested (Childers and Frantz 1994). This survey found 448 C. orchidii (65%), 159 D. trifasciatus (23%), and 85 H. haemorrhoidalis (12 %). C. orchidii was present throughout the season in the citrus orchards and most abundant during the fall months of October and November (Figure 2). Re-infestation of maturing clustered citrus fruits can occur with movement of this thrips pest from alternate hosts including many weed species occurring within citrus orchards to maturing clustered fruits throughout the season.

Bottom Line: Seven citrus orchards on reduced to no pesticide spray programs were sampled for Thysanoptera in central and south central Florida.In comparison, the following five thrips species were most abundant on vines or ground cover plants: F. bispinosa, H. gowdeyi, F. cephalica, M. abdominalis, and F. gossypiana.Fifty-eight species of vines or ground cover plants in 26 families were infested with one or more of 27 species of thrips.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Entomology and Nematology, University of Florida, Citrus Research and Education Center, 700 Experiment Station Road, Lake Alfred, FL 33850, USA. ccc@crec.ifas.ufl.edu

ABSTRACT
Seven citrus orchards on reduced to no pesticide spray programs were sampled for Thysanoptera in central and south central Florida. Inner and outer canopy leaves, fruits, twigs, trunk scrapings, vines and ground cover plants were sampled monthly between January 1995 and January 1996. Thirty-six species of thrips were identified from 2,979 specimens collected from within citrus tree canopies and 18,266 specimens from vines and ground cover plants within the seven citrus orchards. The thrips species included seven predators [Aleurodothrips fasciapennis (Franklin), Karnyothrips flavipes (Jones), K. melaleucus (Bagnall), Leptothrips cassiae (Watson), L. macroocellatus (Watson), L. pini (Watson), and Scolothrips sexmaculatus (Pergande)] 21 plant feeding species [Anaphothrips n. sp., Arorathrips mexicanus (Crawford), Aurantothrips orchidaceous (Bagnall), Baileyothrips limbatus (Hood), Chaetanaphothrips orchidii (Moulton), Danothrips trifasciatus (Sakimura), Echinothrips americanus (Morgan), Frankliniella bispinosa (Morgan), F. cephalica (Crawford), F. fusca (Hinds), F. gossypiana (Hood), Frankliniella sp. (runneri group), Haplothrips gowdeyi (Franklin), Heliothrips haemorrhoidalis (Bouché), Leucothrips piercei (Morgan), Microcephalothrips abdominalis (Crawford), Neohydatothrips floridanus (Watson), N. portoricensis (Morgan), Pseudothrips inequalis (Beach), Scirtothrips sp., and Thrips hawaiiensis (Morgan)]; and eight fungivorous feeding species [Adraneothrips decorus (Hood), Hoplandrothrips pergandei (Hinds), Idolothripinae sp., Merothrips floridensis (Watson), M. morgani (Hood), Neurothrips magnafemoralis (Hinds), Stephanothrips occidentalis Hood and Williams, and Symphyothrips sp.]. Only F. bispinosa, C. orchidii, D. trifasciatus, and H. haemorrhoidalis have been considered economic pests on Florida citrus. Scirtothrips sp. and T. hawaiiensis were recovered in low numbers within Florida citrus orchards. Both are potential pest species to citrus and possibly other crops in Florida. The five most abundant thrips species collected within citrus tree canopies were: A. fasciapennis, F. bispinosa, C. orchidii, K. flavipes, and D. trifasciatus. In comparison, the following five thrips species were most abundant on vines or ground cover plants: F. bispinosa, H. gowdeyi, F. cephalica, M. abdominalis, and F. gossypiana. Fifty-eight species of vines or ground cover plants in 26 families were infested with one or more of 27 species of thrips.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus