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Guild structure, diversity and succession of dung beetles associated with Indian elephant dung in South Western Ghats forests.

Sabu TK, Vinod KV, Vineesh PJ - J. Insect Sci. (2006)

Bottom Line: Abundance of dwellers was high compared to rollers deviating from earlier reports on the high abundance of rollers in the afrotropical regions.Species richness and abundance of tunnelers increased with dung age and decreasing moisture up to a threshold level, followed by a decrease.Rollers and dwellers did not show any significant relationship with dung moisture content.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: PG and Research Department of Zoology, St. Joseph's College, Devagiri, Calicut, Kerala, India. sabukthomas1@gmail.com

ABSTRACT
The diversity, guild structure and succession of dung beetles associated with Indian elephant dung is described in a deciduous forest site in Western Ghats, a hot spot of diversity in India. Dung beetles were collected using baited pitfall traps and from exposed dung pats in the forest at intervals of 1, 3, 5, 7, 15 and 21 days. Twenty-one dung beetle species belonging to the 3 major functional guilds were recorded. Abundance of dwellers was high compared to rollers deviating from earlier reports on the high abundance of rollers in the afrotropical regions. Dweller Drepanocerus setosus and tunneler Onthophagus bronzeus were the most abundant species. Dung pats aged 3-5 days attracted the highest abundance of dung beetles. Bray Curtis similarity index indicated low community similarity between different stages of succession. Species richness and abundance of tunnelers increased with dung age and decreasing moisture up to a threshold level, followed by a decrease. Rollers and dwellers did not show any significant relationship with dung moisture content. Further research is needed to estimate the dung beetle community associated with the dung pats of other mega herbivores as well as of elephant dung in other forests of the Western Ghats.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Dendogram based on hierarchical agglomerative clustering (group-average linking) showing the similarities between the dung beetle assemblages present during different stages of succession.
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i1536-2442-6-17-1-f05: Dendogram based on hierarchical agglomerative clustering (group-average linking) showing the similarities between the dung beetle assemblages present during different stages of succession.

Mentions: A distinct pattern of dung resource partitioning within the tunneler guild was present. Onthophagus species dominated the fresh dung of 3–5 days of dung exposure; Copris signatus, Copris davisoni and Onitis siva dominated the old dung from the 7th –14th day, and a third group of C. repertus and O. subopacus was present in both fresh and old dung without any dung age preferences during 3–14 days. The beetle assemblages present during 3–7 days of succession was the most similar, and assemblages present during the final and initial days of succession were least similar (Fig. 5).


Guild structure, diversity and succession of dung beetles associated with Indian elephant dung in South Western Ghats forests.

Sabu TK, Vinod KV, Vineesh PJ - J. Insect Sci. (2006)

Dendogram based on hierarchical agglomerative clustering (group-average linking) showing the similarities between the dung beetle assemblages present during different stages of succession.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2990306&req=5

i1536-2442-6-17-1-f05: Dendogram based on hierarchical agglomerative clustering (group-average linking) showing the similarities between the dung beetle assemblages present during different stages of succession.
Mentions: A distinct pattern of dung resource partitioning within the tunneler guild was present. Onthophagus species dominated the fresh dung of 3–5 days of dung exposure; Copris signatus, Copris davisoni and Onitis siva dominated the old dung from the 7th –14th day, and a third group of C. repertus and O. subopacus was present in both fresh and old dung without any dung age preferences during 3–14 days. The beetle assemblages present during 3–7 days of succession was the most similar, and assemblages present during the final and initial days of succession were least similar (Fig. 5).

Bottom Line: Abundance of dwellers was high compared to rollers deviating from earlier reports on the high abundance of rollers in the afrotropical regions.Species richness and abundance of tunnelers increased with dung age and decreasing moisture up to a threshold level, followed by a decrease.Rollers and dwellers did not show any significant relationship with dung moisture content.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: PG and Research Department of Zoology, St. Joseph's College, Devagiri, Calicut, Kerala, India. sabukthomas1@gmail.com

ABSTRACT
The diversity, guild structure and succession of dung beetles associated with Indian elephant dung is described in a deciduous forest site in Western Ghats, a hot spot of diversity in India. Dung beetles were collected using baited pitfall traps and from exposed dung pats in the forest at intervals of 1, 3, 5, 7, 15 and 21 days. Twenty-one dung beetle species belonging to the 3 major functional guilds were recorded. Abundance of dwellers was high compared to rollers deviating from earlier reports on the high abundance of rollers in the afrotropical regions. Dweller Drepanocerus setosus and tunneler Onthophagus bronzeus were the most abundant species. Dung pats aged 3-5 days attracted the highest abundance of dung beetles. Bray Curtis similarity index indicated low community similarity between different stages of succession. Species richness and abundance of tunnelers increased with dung age and decreasing moisture up to a threshold level, followed by a decrease. Rollers and dwellers did not show any significant relationship with dung moisture content. Further research is needed to estimate the dung beetle community associated with the dung pats of other mega herbivores as well as of elephant dung in other forests of the Western Ghats.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus