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Prey preference and host suitability of the predatory and parasitoid carabid beetle, Lebia grandis, for several species of Leptinotarsa beetles.

Weber DC, Rowley DL, Greenstone MH, Athanas MM - J. Insect Sci. (2006)

Bottom Line: Our laboratory comparisons suggest that L. juncta, the presumptive original host, best supports the development of the parasitoid larval L. grandis, based on 43.6% successful emergence of the adult carabid parasitoid, compared to 11.5% from the two other Leptinotarsa species.Naive, newly-emerged adults show no preference when presented the 3 species of third-instar larvae, which they consume at a mean rate of 3.3 per day, a rate which does not differ significantly by sex, larval host, or weight at emergence.When presented with equal amounts by weight of the 3 species of Leptinotarsa eggs, such adults consume the equivalent of 23.0 L. decemlineata eggs per day, with consumption of L. juncta eggs 67% higher by weight than L. decemlineata consumption.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Insect Biocontrol Laboratory, USDA ARS PSI, BARC-West, Beltsville, MD 20705, USA. weberd@ba.ars.usda.gov

ABSTRACT
Lebia grandis (Coleoptera: Carabidae), recorded as a parasitoid only on Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), is capable of parasitizing the false potato beetle, L. juncta, and also L. haldemani. Historical records show that L. decemlineata, while the only recorded host, was not present in much of the original range of L. grandis, and may not have been its host prior to its expansion into eastern North America, where L. juncta is endemic. Our laboratory comparisons suggest that L. juncta, the presumptive original host, best supports the development of the parasitoid larval L. grandis, based on 43.6% successful emergence of the adult carabid parasitoid, compared to 11.5% from the two other Leptinotarsa species. L. grandis adults accept eggs and larvae of all 3 Leptinotarsa species as adult food. Naive, newly-emerged adults show no preference when presented the 3 species of third-instar larvae, which they consume at a mean rate of 3.3 per day, a rate which does not differ significantly by sex, larval host, or weight at emergence. When presented with equal amounts by weight of the 3 species of Leptinotarsa eggs, such adults consume the equivalent of 23.0 L. decemlineata eggs per day, with consumption of L. juncta eggs 67% higher by weight than L. decemlineata consumption. Insight into the biotic and abiotic limitations on L. grandis should aid in determining its potential for suppression of Colorado potato beetle by biological control in diverse agroecosystems.

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Relationship of Lebia grandis mass (newly-emerged carabid adult) versus host mass (Leptinotarsa prepupa). Slope of regression line is significantly different from zero only for Leptinotarsa decemlineata (solid yellow line: y = 6.51 + 0.172X (n = 13, p= 0.008, R2adj = 0.44)); however, slopes for the three hosts do not differ; the significant effect of host is attributable to a reduced mean Lebia mass for those parasitizing Leptinotarsa haldemani, compared to the other two species. Means and standard errors are shown for each host.
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i1536-2442-6-9-1-f09: Relationship of Lebia grandis mass (newly-emerged carabid adult) versus host mass (Leptinotarsa prepupa). Slope of regression line is significantly different from zero only for Leptinotarsa decemlineata (solid yellow line: y = 6.51 + 0.172X (n = 13, p= 0.008, R2adj = 0.44)); however, slopes for the three hosts do not differ; the significant effect of host is attributable to a reduced mean Lebia mass for those parasitizing Leptinotarsa haldemani, compared to the other two species. Means and standard errors are shown for each host.

Mentions: The mean adult mass of newly emerged L. grandis was positively related to the prepupal mass of the host, an effect significant only for L. decemlineata (Figure 9 and caption). There was a significant host effect attributable to whether the host was L. haldemani, which depressed adult parasitoid mass by 6.2 mg independent of host mass (Figure 9). There was no interaction of host type and prepupal mass effects, therefore, the regression lines shown are not significantly non-parallel. Means for adult mass of L. grandis based on host were 31.0 mg for L. decemlineata host, 30.6 mg for L. juncta, and 24.6 mg for L. haldemani. Newly emerged male and female adult L. grandis did not differ by fresh mass. Initial mass of the first-instar carabids was not measured, so this parameter could not be examined for influence on the adult emergence mass.


Prey preference and host suitability of the predatory and parasitoid carabid beetle, Lebia grandis, for several species of Leptinotarsa beetles.

Weber DC, Rowley DL, Greenstone MH, Athanas MM - J. Insect Sci. (2006)

Relationship of Lebia grandis mass (newly-emerged carabid adult) versus host mass (Leptinotarsa prepupa). Slope of regression line is significantly different from zero only for Leptinotarsa decemlineata (solid yellow line: y = 6.51 + 0.172X (n = 13, p= 0.008, R2adj = 0.44)); however, slopes for the three hosts do not differ; the significant effect of host is attributable to a reduced mean Lebia mass for those parasitizing Leptinotarsa haldemani, compared to the other two species. Means and standard errors are shown for each host.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2990295&req=5

i1536-2442-6-9-1-f09: Relationship of Lebia grandis mass (newly-emerged carabid adult) versus host mass (Leptinotarsa prepupa). Slope of regression line is significantly different from zero only for Leptinotarsa decemlineata (solid yellow line: y = 6.51 + 0.172X (n = 13, p= 0.008, R2adj = 0.44)); however, slopes for the three hosts do not differ; the significant effect of host is attributable to a reduced mean Lebia mass for those parasitizing Leptinotarsa haldemani, compared to the other two species. Means and standard errors are shown for each host.
Mentions: The mean adult mass of newly emerged L. grandis was positively related to the prepupal mass of the host, an effect significant only for L. decemlineata (Figure 9 and caption). There was a significant host effect attributable to whether the host was L. haldemani, which depressed adult parasitoid mass by 6.2 mg independent of host mass (Figure 9). There was no interaction of host type and prepupal mass effects, therefore, the regression lines shown are not significantly non-parallel. Means for adult mass of L. grandis based on host were 31.0 mg for L. decemlineata host, 30.6 mg for L. juncta, and 24.6 mg for L. haldemani. Newly emerged male and female adult L. grandis did not differ by fresh mass. Initial mass of the first-instar carabids was not measured, so this parameter could not be examined for influence on the adult emergence mass.

Bottom Line: Our laboratory comparisons suggest that L. juncta, the presumptive original host, best supports the development of the parasitoid larval L. grandis, based on 43.6% successful emergence of the adult carabid parasitoid, compared to 11.5% from the two other Leptinotarsa species.Naive, newly-emerged adults show no preference when presented the 3 species of third-instar larvae, which they consume at a mean rate of 3.3 per day, a rate which does not differ significantly by sex, larval host, or weight at emergence.When presented with equal amounts by weight of the 3 species of Leptinotarsa eggs, such adults consume the equivalent of 23.0 L. decemlineata eggs per day, with consumption of L. juncta eggs 67% higher by weight than L. decemlineata consumption.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Insect Biocontrol Laboratory, USDA ARS PSI, BARC-West, Beltsville, MD 20705, USA. weberd@ba.ars.usda.gov

ABSTRACT
Lebia grandis (Coleoptera: Carabidae), recorded as a parasitoid only on Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae), is capable of parasitizing the false potato beetle, L. juncta, and also L. haldemani. Historical records show that L. decemlineata, while the only recorded host, was not present in much of the original range of L. grandis, and may not have been its host prior to its expansion into eastern North America, where L. juncta is endemic. Our laboratory comparisons suggest that L. juncta, the presumptive original host, best supports the development of the parasitoid larval L. grandis, based on 43.6% successful emergence of the adult carabid parasitoid, compared to 11.5% from the two other Leptinotarsa species. L. grandis adults accept eggs and larvae of all 3 Leptinotarsa species as adult food. Naive, newly-emerged adults show no preference when presented the 3 species of third-instar larvae, which they consume at a mean rate of 3.3 per day, a rate which does not differ significantly by sex, larval host, or weight at emergence. When presented with equal amounts by weight of the 3 species of Leptinotarsa eggs, such adults consume the equivalent of 23.0 L. decemlineata eggs per day, with consumption of L. juncta eggs 67% higher by weight than L. decemlineata consumption. Insight into the biotic and abiotic limitations on L. grandis should aid in determining its potential for suppression of Colorado potato beetle by biological control in diverse agroecosystems.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus