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Persistent pods of the tree Acacia caven: a natural refuge for diverse insects including Bruchid beetles and the parasitoids Trichogrammatidae, Pteromalidae and Eulophidae.

Rojas-Rousse D - J. Insect Sci. (2006)

Bottom Line: The persistent pods of the tree, Acacia caven that do not fall from the tree provide opportunities for the appearance of a diverse group of insects the following season.These persistent pods are a natural refuge for insect species, namely two bruchid beetles (Pseudopachymeria spinipes, Stator furcatus), one scolytidae (Dendroctonus sp), lepidopterous larvae, ant colonies (Camponotus sp), one species of oophagous parasitoid (Uscana espinae group senex), the gregarious larval-pupae parasitoid Monoksa dorsiplana (Pteromalidae) and two species of Horismenus spp. (Eulophidae).The patriline of M. dorsiplana is frequently formed by 1 son + 7 daughters.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institut de Recherche sur la Biologie de l'Insecte, UMR CNRS 6035, Faculté des Sciences, F-37200 Tours, France. rousse@univ-tours.fr

ABSTRACT
The persistent pods of the tree, Acacia caven that do not fall from the tree provide opportunities for the appearance of a diverse group of insects the following season. Such pods collected during the spring of 1999 in Chile were indehiscent with highly sclerified pod walls. In contrast, persistent pods collected in Uruguay after a wet winter and spring (2002) were partially dehiscent, inducing the deterioration of the woody pods, and consequently exposing the seeds. These persistent pods are a natural refuge for insect species, namely two bruchid beetles (Pseudopachymeria spinipes, Stator furcatus), one scolytidae (Dendroctonus sp), lepidopterous larvae, ant colonies (Camponotus sp), one species of oophagous parasitoid (Uscana espinae group senex), the gregarious larval-pupae parasitoid Monoksa dorsiplana (Pteromalidae) and two species of Horismenus spp. (Eulophidae). The patriline of M. dorsiplana is frequently formed by 1 son + 7 daughters.

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Change in seed quality per pod of Acacia caven. Fifty A. caven pods were opened, seeds attacked by Bruchid beetles were separated out and the ability of seeds to grow was evaluated. Total seeds (red line), seeds attacked by Bruchid beetles (blue line), live seeds (purple line).
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i1536-2442-6-8-1-f05: Change in seed quality per pod of Acacia caven. Fifty A. caven pods were opened, seeds attacked by Bruchid beetles were separated out and the ability of seeds to grow was evaluated. Total seeds (red line), seeds attacked by Bruchid beetles (blue line), live seeds (purple line).

Mentions: Study of the change in seed quality indicated that the number of contaminated seeds was close to the total number of seeds (Figure 5), with 82% of the total seeds (587/717) attacked by the bruchid beetles. On average, there were 14.35 ± 1.45 seeds in a pod (mean ± SE), with 11.75 ± 1.40 contaminated by bruchid beetles (the difference observed was significant: Student test, t = 6.10; α = 0.05). The difference between the total number of seeds and the number of attacked seeds per pod corresponded to the seeds able to start growth (10.5%), and those that could not (7.5%).


Persistent pods of the tree Acacia caven: a natural refuge for diverse insects including Bruchid beetles and the parasitoids Trichogrammatidae, Pteromalidae and Eulophidae.

Rojas-Rousse D - J. Insect Sci. (2006)

Change in seed quality per pod of Acacia caven. Fifty A. caven pods were opened, seeds attacked by Bruchid beetles were separated out and the ability of seeds to grow was evaluated. Total seeds (red line), seeds attacked by Bruchid beetles (blue line), live seeds (purple line).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2990294&req=5

i1536-2442-6-8-1-f05: Change in seed quality per pod of Acacia caven. Fifty A. caven pods were opened, seeds attacked by Bruchid beetles were separated out and the ability of seeds to grow was evaluated. Total seeds (red line), seeds attacked by Bruchid beetles (blue line), live seeds (purple line).
Mentions: Study of the change in seed quality indicated that the number of contaminated seeds was close to the total number of seeds (Figure 5), with 82% of the total seeds (587/717) attacked by the bruchid beetles. On average, there were 14.35 ± 1.45 seeds in a pod (mean ± SE), with 11.75 ± 1.40 contaminated by bruchid beetles (the difference observed was significant: Student test, t = 6.10; α = 0.05). The difference between the total number of seeds and the number of attacked seeds per pod corresponded to the seeds able to start growth (10.5%), and those that could not (7.5%).

Bottom Line: The persistent pods of the tree, Acacia caven that do not fall from the tree provide opportunities for the appearance of a diverse group of insects the following season.These persistent pods are a natural refuge for insect species, namely two bruchid beetles (Pseudopachymeria spinipes, Stator furcatus), one scolytidae (Dendroctonus sp), lepidopterous larvae, ant colonies (Camponotus sp), one species of oophagous parasitoid (Uscana espinae group senex), the gregarious larval-pupae parasitoid Monoksa dorsiplana (Pteromalidae) and two species of Horismenus spp. (Eulophidae).The patriline of M. dorsiplana is frequently formed by 1 son + 7 daughters.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institut de Recherche sur la Biologie de l'Insecte, UMR CNRS 6035, Faculté des Sciences, F-37200 Tours, France. rousse@univ-tours.fr

ABSTRACT
The persistent pods of the tree, Acacia caven that do not fall from the tree provide opportunities for the appearance of a diverse group of insects the following season. Such pods collected during the spring of 1999 in Chile were indehiscent with highly sclerified pod walls. In contrast, persistent pods collected in Uruguay after a wet winter and spring (2002) were partially dehiscent, inducing the deterioration of the woody pods, and consequently exposing the seeds. These persistent pods are a natural refuge for insect species, namely two bruchid beetles (Pseudopachymeria spinipes, Stator furcatus), one scolytidae (Dendroctonus sp), lepidopterous larvae, ant colonies (Camponotus sp), one species of oophagous parasitoid (Uscana espinae group senex), the gregarious larval-pupae parasitoid Monoksa dorsiplana (Pteromalidae) and two species of Horismenus spp. (Eulophidae). The patriline of M. dorsiplana is frequently formed by 1 son + 7 daughters.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus