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Incorporation of rhodamine B into male tobacco budworm moths Heliothis virescens to use as a marker for mating studies.

Blanco CA, Perera O, Ray JD, Taliercio E, Williams L - J. Insect Sci. (2006)

Bottom Line: The intake of this dye did not affect the life span, the production of eggs or the capacity of moths to copulate when compared with moths fed only a sucrose solution or water.The dye accumulation in internal abdominal organs was a better indicator of the presence of the pigment than external contamination of the moth.The use of the method described in this report can be a tool for the rapid incorporation of a low cost dye in the tobacco budworm for biological, behavioral and genetic studies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: USDA-ARS, Southern Insect Management Research Unit, Stoneville, MS 38776, USA. cblanco@ars.usda.gov

ABSTRACT
Rhodamine B, a dye commonly used in a variety of biological studies was incorporated into the bodies of male tobacco budworm moths, Heliothis virescens (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), by allowing them to feed freely on 0.1% rhodamine dissolved in a 10% sucrose solution. After exposing males for one to three days to this pigment, rhodamine was clearly detectable in >82% of spermatophores extracted from untreated females. The intake of this dye did not affect the life span, the production of eggs or the capacity of moths to copulate when compared with moths fed only a sucrose solution or water. Rhodamine B was easily identifiable externally but was more apparent internally in males after only one day of exposure to the pigment. Even at this short feeding duration, rhodamine was detectable in >50% of males 5 days after feeding stopped. Longer exposure to the dye significantly increased the percentage stained. Detection of rhodamine was slightly enhanced by the use of ultraviolet light. The dye accumulation in internal abdominal organs was a better indicator of the presence of the pigment than external contamination of the moth. The use of the method described in this report can be a tool for the rapid incorporation of a low cost dye in the tobacco budworm for biological, behavioral and genetic studies.

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Cumulative Heliothis virescens male mortality after feeding on water, 10% sucrose solution or 0.1% rhodamine B solution for 1–4 days. (N = 48).
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i1536-2442-6-5-1-f06: Cumulative Heliothis virescens male mortality after feeding on water, 10% sucrose solution or 0.1% rhodamine B solution for 1–4 days. (N = 48).

Mentions: A set of six carton containers per treatment (water, sucrose or 0.1% rhodamine solution) with 20 same-sex moths each per replication were set-up to feed for one, two, three or four consecutive days. Sponges that supplied treatments were rewetted daily and removed after the fixed number of days (1 - 4). One randomly chosen container per treatment was rated each day for six consecutive evaluation days to assess moth mortality (0 - 5 days shown in Figures 6 and 7). Surviving moths in containers at each evaluation date were frozen for detection analysis. A sub-sample of ≤12 frozen moths was taken at random from each treatment / evaluation date sample. This experiment was repeated four times on different dates.


Incorporation of rhodamine B into male tobacco budworm moths Heliothis virescens to use as a marker for mating studies.

Blanco CA, Perera O, Ray JD, Taliercio E, Williams L - J. Insect Sci. (2006)

Cumulative Heliothis virescens male mortality after feeding on water, 10% sucrose solution or 0.1% rhodamine B solution for 1–4 days. (N = 48).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2990291&req=5

i1536-2442-6-5-1-f06: Cumulative Heliothis virescens male mortality after feeding on water, 10% sucrose solution or 0.1% rhodamine B solution for 1–4 days. (N = 48).
Mentions: A set of six carton containers per treatment (water, sucrose or 0.1% rhodamine solution) with 20 same-sex moths each per replication were set-up to feed for one, two, three or four consecutive days. Sponges that supplied treatments were rewetted daily and removed after the fixed number of days (1 - 4). One randomly chosen container per treatment was rated each day for six consecutive evaluation days to assess moth mortality (0 - 5 days shown in Figures 6 and 7). Surviving moths in containers at each evaluation date were frozen for detection analysis. A sub-sample of ≤12 frozen moths was taken at random from each treatment / evaluation date sample. This experiment was repeated four times on different dates.

Bottom Line: The intake of this dye did not affect the life span, the production of eggs or the capacity of moths to copulate when compared with moths fed only a sucrose solution or water.The dye accumulation in internal abdominal organs was a better indicator of the presence of the pigment than external contamination of the moth.The use of the method described in this report can be a tool for the rapid incorporation of a low cost dye in the tobacco budworm for biological, behavioral and genetic studies.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: USDA-ARS, Southern Insect Management Research Unit, Stoneville, MS 38776, USA. cblanco@ars.usda.gov

ABSTRACT
Rhodamine B, a dye commonly used in a variety of biological studies was incorporated into the bodies of male tobacco budworm moths, Heliothis virescens (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), by allowing them to feed freely on 0.1% rhodamine dissolved in a 10% sucrose solution. After exposing males for one to three days to this pigment, rhodamine was clearly detectable in >82% of spermatophores extracted from untreated females. The intake of this dye did not affect the life span, the production of eggs or the capacity of moths to copulate when compared with moths fed only a sucrose solution or water. Rhodamine B was easily identifiable externally but was more apparent internally in males after only one day of exposure to the pigment. Even at this short feeding duration, rhodamine was detectable in >50% of males 5 days after feeding stopped. Longer exposure to the dye significantly increased the percentage stained. Detection of rhodamine was slightly enhanced by the use of ultraviolet light. The dye accumulation in internal abdominal organs was a better indicator of the presence of the pigment than external contamination of the moth. The use of the method described in this report can be a tool for the rapid incorporation of a low cost dye in the tobacco budworm for biological, behavioral and genetic studies.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus