Limits...
Multiple host-plant use may arise from gender-specific fitness effects.

Gibbs M, Lace LA, Jones MJ, Moore AJ - J. Insect Sci. (2006)

Bottom Line: If host-species can directly affect development rates and body size, and if there are gender differences in resource allocation during development, there can be different sex-specific selection pressures associated with different hosts.These results would suggest that oviposition behavior is a complex process, and use of multiple hosts may have evolved to balance the conflicting needs of male and female larvae.Co-evolution of host selection and oviposition behaviors may help to balance the differing performance needs of offspring.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Biological Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK. melanie.gibbs@man.ac.uk

ABSTRACT
Ovipositing females are predicted to select host-plants that will maximise offspring survival and fitness. Yet hosts often differ in the component of larval fitness affected so host-selection often involves a trade-off between short development times and large size and high fecundity of offspring. If host-species can directly affect development rates and body size, and if there are gender differences in resource allocation during development, there can be different sex-specific selection pressures associated with different hosts. Using a Madeiran population of the speckled wood butterfly Pararge aegeria (L.) as the model species gender differences in larval development and size were examined in response to the hosts Brachypodium sylvaticum, Holcus lanatus and Poa annua. It was observed that male and female P. aegeria larvae differed, with their responses dependent on the host species. These results would suggest that oviposition behavior is a complex process, and use of multiple hosts may have evolved to balance the conflicting needs of male and female larvae. Co-evolution of host selection and oviposition behaviors may help to balance the differing performance needs of offspring.

Show MeSH
The effects of host-plant and gender on growth rates (mg/day) in male and female P. aegeria larvae where plant species 1 = 5. sylvaticum, 2 = H. lanatus and 3 = P. annua
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2990290&req=5

i1536-2442-6-4-1-f01: The effects of host-plant and gender on growth rates (mg/day) in male and female P. aegeria larvae where plant species 1 = 5. sylvaticum, 2 = H. lanatus and 3 = P. annua

Mentions: Growth rate was significantly affected by host plant species, and there was a significant gender x host-plant interaction, but no affect of gender alone (Table 1). Males had faster growth rates than females on B. sylvaticum and P. annua, but on H. lanatus females had faster growth rates than males (Figure 1).


Multiple host-plant use may arise from gender-specific fitness effects.

Gibbs M, Lace LA, Jones MJ, Moore AJ - J. Insect Sci. (2006)

The effects of host-plant and gender on growth rates (mg/day) in male and female P. aegeria larvae where plant species 1 = 5. sylvaticum, 2 = H. lanatus and 3 = P. annua
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2990290&req=5

i1536-2442-6-4-1-f01: The effects of host-plant and gender on growth rates (mg/day) in male and female P. aegeria larvae where plant species 1 = 5. sylvaticum, 2 = H. lanatus and 3 = P. annua
Mentions: Growth rate was significantly affected by host plant species, and there was a significant gender x host-plant interaction, but no affect of gender alone (Table 1). Males had faster growth rates than females on B. sylvaticum and P. annua, but on H. lanatus females had faster growth rates than males (Figure 1).

Bottom Line: If host-species can directly affect development rates and body size, and if there are gender differences in resource allocation during development, there can be different sex-specific selection pressures associated with different hosts.These results would suggest that oviposition behavior is a complex process, and use of multiple hosts may have evolved to balance the conflicting needs of male and female larvae.Co-evolution of host selection and oviposition behaviors may help to balance the differing performance needs of offspring.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: School of Biological Sciences, University of Manchester, Manchester, UK. melanie.gibbs@man.ac.uk

ABSTRACT
Ovipositing females are predicted to select host-plants that will maximise offspring survival and fitness. Yet hosts often differ in the component of larval fitness affected so host-selection often involves a trade-off between short development times and large size and high fecundity of offspring. If host-species can directly affect development rates and body size, and if there are gender differences in resource allocation during development, there can be different sex-specific selection pressures associated with different hosts. Using a Madeiran population of the speckled wood butterfly Pararge aegeria (L.) as the model species gender differences in larval development and size were examined in response to the hosts Brachypodium sylvaticum, Holcus lanatus and Poa annua. It was observed that male and female P. aegeria larvae differed, with their responses dependent on the host species. These results would suggest that oviposition behavior is a complex process, and use of multiple hosts may have evolved to balance the conflicting needs of male and female larvae. Co-evolution of host selection and oviposition behaviors may help to balance the differing performance needs of offspring.

Show MeSH