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A case of giant squamous cell carcinoma of the buttock possibly arose from syringocystadenoma and invaded to the rectum.

Nishioka M, Tanemura A, Yamanaka T, Umegaki N, Tani M, Katayama I, Takemasa I, Sekimoto M, Tomita K, Tamai N - J Skin Cancer (2010)

Bottom Line: We report a rare case of giant squamous cell carcinoma of the buttock infiltrated to the rectum.The tumor may have arisen from syringocystadenoma papilliferum.Afterwards, the patient has been alive free from disease for 15 months with no lymph node and distant organ metastasis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Dermatology, Course of Integrated Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita-shi, Osaka 565-0871, Japan.

ABSTRACT
We report a rare case of giant squamous cell carcinoma of the buttock infiltrated to the rectum. The tumor may have arisen from syringocystadenoma papilliferum. Since there was no sign of metastasis, radical operation including rectal amputation was performed after successful neoadjuvant therapies. Afterwards, the patient has been alive free from disease for 15 months with no lymph node and distant organ metastasis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

According to the first extent of tumor, buttock skin was excised together with sacrococcyx, and rectum. Reconstructive surgery by musclocutaneous flap of abdominal rectus muscle and colostomy was performed.
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fig5: According to the first extent of tumor, buttock skin was excised together with sacrococcyx, and rectum. Reconstructive surgery by musclocutaneous flap of abdominal rectus muscle and colostomy was performed.

Mentions: Since there is no evidence of metastasis during the above treatments, we decided to perform a radical operative procedure to achieve complete control of the tumor. According to the first extent of tumor, it was excised together with sacrococcyx and rectum. The perineum was reconstructed with a pedicled musclocutaneous flap using the right abdominal rectus muscle, and sigmoid colostoma was created (Figures 5 and 6).


A case of giant squamous cell carcinoma of the buttock possibly arose from syringocystadenoma and invaded to the rectum.

Nishioka M, Tanemura A, Yamanaka T, Umegaki N, Tani M, Katayama I, Takemasa I, Sekimoto M, Tomita K, Tamai N - J Skin Cancer (2010)

According to the first extent of tumor, buttock skin was excised together with sacrococcyx, and rectum. Reconstructive surgery by musclocutaneous flap of abdominal rectus muscle and colostomy was performed.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2990122&req=5

fig5: According to the first extent of tumor, buttock skin was excised together with sacrococcyx, and rectum. Reconstructive surgery by musclocutaneous flap of abdominal rectus muscle and colostomy was performed.
Mentions: Since there is no evidence of metastasis during the above treatments, we decided to perform a radical operative procedure to achieve complete control of the tumor. According to the first extent of tumor, it was excised together with sacrococcyx and rectum. The perineum was reconstructed with a pedicled musclocutaneous flap using the right abdominal rectus muscle, and sigmoid colostoma was created (Figures 5 and 6).

Bottom Line: We report a rare case of giant squamous cell carcinoma of the buttock infiltrated to the rectum.The tumor may have arisen from syringocystadenoma papilliferum.Afterwards, the patient has been alive free from disease for 15 months with no lymph node and distant organ metastasis.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Dermatology, Course of Integrated Medicine, Graduate School of Medicine, Osaka University, 2-2 Yamadaoka, Suita-shi, Osaka 565-0871, Japan.

ABSTRACT
We report a rare case of giant squamous cell carcinoma of the buttock infiltrated to the rectum. The tumor may have arisen from syringocystadenoma papilliferum. Since there was no sign of metastasis, radical operation including rectal amputation was performed after successful neoadjuvant therapies. Afterwards, the patient has been alive free from disease for 15 months with no lymph node and distant organ metastasis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus