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Joint influence of small-effect genetic variants on human longevity.

Yashin AI, Wu D, Arbeev KG, Ukraintseva SV - Aging (Albany NY) (2010)

Bottom Line: Individually such alleles have little predictive values, therefore they were usually excluded from further analyses.The results of our study strongly suggest that the alleles with small individual effects on longevity may jointly influence life span so that the resulting influence can be both substantial and significant.We show that this joint influence can be described by a relatively simple "genetic dose - phenotypic response" relationship.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Population Health and Aging, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708-0408, USA. aiy@duke.edu

ABSTRACT
The results of genome-wide association studies of complex traits, such as life span or age at onset of chronic disease, suggest that such traits are typically affected by a large number of small-effect alleles. Individually such alleles have little predictive values, therefore they were usually excluded from further analyses. The results of our study strongly suggest that the alleles with small individual effects on longevity may jointly influence life span so that the resulting influence can be both substantial and significant. We show that this joint influence can be described by a relatively simple "genetic dose - phenotypic response" relationship.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

The “genetic dose - phenotypic response” relationship between the numbers of selected 39 longevity alleles contained in individuals' genome and mean life span obtained in the analyses of 550K SNP data on participants of the original FHS cohort. Regression analyses were performed using SAS PROC REG (© SAS Institute, Inc.) with correction for heteroscedasticity.
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Figure 2: The “genetic dose - phenotypic response” relationship between the numbers of selected 39 longevity alleles contained in individuals' genome and mean life span obtained in the analyses of 550K SNP data on participants of the original FHS cohort. Regression analyses were performed using SAS PROC REG (© SAS Institute, Inc.) with correction for heteroscedasticity.

Mentions: This set of 39 SNPs was then used in regression analyses where life span was considered as a linear function of the number of longevity SNPs contained in person's genome. The result is shown in Figure 2.


Joint influence of small-effect genetic variants on human longevity.

Yashin AI, Wu D, Arbeev KG, Ukraintseva SV - Aging (Albany NY) (2010)

The “genetic dose - phenotypic response” relationship between the numbers of selected 39 longevity alleles contained in individuals' genome and mean life span obtained in the analyses of 550K SNP data on participants of the original FHS cohort. Regression analyses were performed using SAS PROC REG (© SAS Institute, Inc.) with correction for heteroscedasticity.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2984609&req=5

Figure 2: The “genetic dose - phenotypic response” relationship between the numbers of selected 39 longevity alleles contained in individuals' genome and mean life span obtained in the analyses of 550K SNP data on participants of the original FHS cohort. Regression analyses were performed using SAS PROC REG (© SAS Institute, Inc.) with correction for heteroscedasticity.
Mentions: This set of 39 SNPs was then used in regression analyses where life span was considered as a linear function of the number of longevity SNPs contained in person's genome. The result is shown in Figure 2.

Bottom Line: Individually such alleles have little predictive values, therefore they were usually excluded from further analyses.The results of our study strongly suggest that the alleles with small individual effects on longevity may jointly influence life span so that the resulting influence can be both substantial and significant.We show that this joint influence can be described by a relatively simple "genetic dose - phenotypic response" relationship.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Center for Population Health and Aging, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708-0408, USA. aiy@duke.edu

ABSTRACT
The results of genome-wide association studies of complex traits, such as life span or age at onset of chronic disease, suggest that such traits are typically affected by a large number of small-effect alleles. Individually such alleles have little predictive values, therefore they were usually excluded from further analyses. The results of our study strongly suggest that the alleles with small individual effects on longevity may jointly influence life span so that the resulting influence can be both substantial and significant. We show that this joint influence can be described by a relatively simple "genetic dose - phenotypic response" relationship.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus