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Analysis of trigeminal nerve disorders after oral and maxillofacial intervention.

Yekta SS, Koch F, Grosjean MB, Esteves-Oliveira M, Stein JM, Ghassemi A, Riediger D, Lampert F, Smeets R - Head Face Med (2010)

Bottom Line: QST monitored somatosensory deficits and recovery of trigeminal nerve functions in all patients.Additionally, QST monitored recovery of nerve functions in all patients.QST can be applied for non-invasive assessment of sensory nerve function (Aβ-, Aδ- and C-fiber) in the orofacial region and is useful in the diagnosis of trigeminal nerve disorders in patients.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Conservative Dentistry, Periodontology and Preventive Dentistry, Aachen University, Germany. ssaidyekta@izkf.rwth-aachen.de

ABSTRACT

Background: Quantitative sensory testing (QST) is applied to evaluate somatosensory nerve fiber function in the spinal system. This study uses QST in patients with sensory dysfunctions after oral and maxillofacial surgery.

Methods: Orofacial sensory functions were investigated by psychophysical means in 60 volunteers (30 patients with sensory disturbances and 30 control subjects) in innervation areas of the infraorbital, mental and lingual nerves. The patients were tested 1 week, 4 weeks, 7 weeks and 10 weeks following oral and maxillofacial surgery.

Results: QST monitored somatosensory deficits and recovery of trigeminal nerve functions in all patients. Significant differences (p < 0.05) between control group and patients were shown for cold, warm and mechanical detection thresholds and for cold, heat and mechanical pain thresholds. Additionally, QST monitored recovery of nerve functions in all patients.

Conclusion: QST can be applied for non-invasive assessment of sensory nerve function (Aβ-, Aδ- and C-fiber) in the orofacial region and is useful in the diagnosis of trigeminal nerve disorders in patients.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Monitoring of sensory thresholds in 30 patients and 30 volunteers after oral and maxillofacial surgery. Thermal sensory limen (TSL) and cold pain threshold (CPT) were determined from 120 QST experiments in 30 patients and 30 QST experiments in 30 control subjects. TSL shows mean differences between temperatures causing warm and cold perceptions. CPT is defined as absolute temperatures (°C). White bars show data of the control group and grey bars (1 w: one week, 4 w: 4 weeks, 7 w: 7 weeks, 10 w: 10 weeks after surgery) present data of test areas. Data on control group and test areas are presented as box plots. Solid lines indicate median, dashed lines the arithmetic mean. Significant differences compared to the control group are indicated by asterisks over the bars (*: p < 0.05; Friedman Repeated Measures ANOVA and subsequent Student-Newman-Keuls test).
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Figure 2: Monitoring of sensory thresholds in 30 patients and 30 volunteers after oral and maxillofacial surgery. Thermal sensory limen (TSL) and cold pain threshold (CPT) were determined from 120 QST experiments in 30 patients and 30 QST experiments in 30 control subjects. TSL shows mean differences between temperatures causing warm and cold perceptions. CPT is defined as absolute temperatures (°C). White bars show data of the control group and grey bars (1 w: one week, 4 w: 4 weeks, 7 w: 7 weeks, 10 w: 10 weeks after surgery) present data of test areas. Data on control group and test areas are presented as box plots. Solid lines indicate median, dashed lines the arithmetic mean. Significant differences compared to the control group are indicated by asterisks over the bars (*: p < 0.05; Friedman Repeated Measures ANOVA and subsequent Student-Newman-Keuls test).

Mentions: Significant differences (p < 0.05) between control group and test side 1 week after surgery were shown for CDT (χ2 = 48.530, p < 0.001), WDT (χ2 = 89.310, p < 0.001) (Figure 1), TSL (χ2 = 67.097, p < 0.001), CPT (χ2 = 24.144, p < 0.001) (Figure 2), HPT (χ2 = 36.808, p < 0.001), MDT (χ2 = 76.096, p < 0.001) (Figure 3) and MPT (χ2 = 21.222, p < 0.001) (Figure 4). No significant differences between the median values of the measurements were shown for PHS, MPS, ALL, WUR and VDT (Table 1).


Analysis of trigeminal nerve disorders after oral and maxillofacial intervention.

Yekta SS, Koch F, Grosjean MB, Esteves-Oliveira M, Stein JM, Ghassemi A, Riediger D, Lampert F, Smeets R - Head Face Med (2010)

Monitoring of sensory thresholds in 30 patients and 30 volunteers after oral and maxillofacial surgery. Thermal sensory limen (TSL) and cold pain threshold (CPT) were determined from 120 QST experiments in 30 patients and 30 QST experiments in 30 control subjects. TSL shows mean differences between temperatures causing warm and cold perceptions. CPT is defined as absolute temperatures (°C). White bars show data of the control group and grey bars (1 w: one week, 4 w: 4 weeks, 7 w: 7 weeks, 10 w: 10 weeks after surgery) present data of test areas. Data on control group and test areas are presented as box plots. Solid lines indicate median, dashed lines the arithmetic mean. Significant differences compared to the control group are indicated by asterisks over the bars (*: p < 0.05; Friedman Repeated Measures ANOVA and subsequent Student-Newman-Keuls test).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2984556&req=5

Figure 2: Monitoring of sensory thresholds in 30 patients and 30 volunteers after oral and maxillofacial surgery. Thermal sensory limen (TSL) and cold pain threshold (CPT) were determined from 120 QST experiments in 30 patients and 30 QST experiments in 30 control subjects. TSL shows mean differences between temperatures causing warm and cold perceptions. CPT is defined as absolute temperatures (°C). White bars show data of the control group and grey bars (1 w: one week, 4 w: 4 weeks, 7 w: 7 weeks, 10 w: 10 weeks after surgery) present data of test areas. Data on control group and test areas are presented as box plots. Solid lines indicate median, dashed lines the arithmetic mean. Significant differences compared to the control group are indicated by asterisks over the bars (*: p < 0.05; Friedman Repeated Measures ANOVA and subsequent Student-Newman-Keuls test).
Mentions: Significant differences (p < 0.05) between control group and test side 1 week after surgery were shown for CDT (χ2 = 48.530, p < 0.001), WDT (χ2 = 89.310, p < 0.001) (Figure 1), TSL (χ2 = 67.097, p < 0.001), CPT (χ2 = 24.144, p < 0.001) (Figure 2), HPT (χ2 = 36.808, p < 0.001), MDT (χ2 = 76.096, p < 0.001) (Figure 3) and MPT (χ2 = 21.222, p < 0.001) (Figure 4). No significant differences between the median values of the measurements were shown for PHS, MPS, ALL, WUR and VDT (Table 1).

Bottom Line: QST monitored somatosensory deficits and recovery of trigeminal nerve functions in all patients.Additionally, QST monitored recovery of nerve functions in all patients.QST can be applied for non-invasive assessment of sensory nerve function (Aβ-, Aδ- and C-fiber) in the orofacial region and is useful in the diagnosis of trigeminal nerve disorders in patients.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Conservative Dentistry, Periodontology and Preventive Dentistry, Aachen University, Germany. ssaidyekta@izkf.rwth-aachen.de

ABSTRACT

Background: Quantitative sensory testing (QST) is applied to evaluate somatosensory nerve fiber function in the spinal system. This study uses QST in patients with sensory dysfunctions after oral and maxillofacial surgery.

Methods: Orofacial sensory functions were investigated by psychophysical means in 60 volunteers (30 patients with sensory disturbances and 30 control subjects) in innervation areas of the infraorbital, mental and lingual nerves. The patients were tested 1 week, 4 weeks, 7 weeks and 10 weeks following oral and maxillofacial surgery.

Results: QST monitored somatosensory deficits and recovery of trigeminal nerve functions in all patients. Significant differences (p < 0.05) between control group and patients were shown for cold, warm and mechanical detection thresholds and for cold, heat and mechanical pain thresholds. Additionally, QST monitored recovery of nerve functions in all patients.

Conclusion: QST can be applied for non-invasive assessment of sensory nerve function (Aβ-, Aδ- and C-fiber) in the orofacial region and is useful in the diagnosis of trigeminal nerve disorders in patients.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus