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Respiratory virus infection and risk of invasive meningococcal disease in central Ontario, Canada.

Tuite AR, Kinlin LM, Kuster SP, Jamieson F, Kwong JC, McGeer A, Fisman DN - PLoS ONE (2010)

Bottom Line: Increasing weekly RSV activity was associated with increased risk of IMD after adjusting for RSV activity in the previous 3 weeks (per 100 case increase, OR = 4.31, 95% CI: 1.14, 16.32).We have identified an acute effect of influenza A and RSV activity on IMD risk.If confirmed, these finding suggest that influenza vaccination may have the indirect benefit of reducing IMD risk.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada.

ABSTRACT

Background: In temperate climates, invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) incidence tends to coincide with or closely follow peak incidence of influenza virus infection; at a seasonal level, increased influenza activity frequently correlates with increased seasonal risk of IMD.

Methods: We evaluated 240 cases of IMD reported in central Ontario, Canada, from 2000 to 2006. Associations between environmental and virological (influenza A, influenza B and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)) exposures and IMD incidence were evaluated using negative binomial regression models controlling for seasonal oscillation. Acute effects of weekly respiratory virus activity on IMD risk were evaluated using a matched-period case-crossover design with random directionality of control selection. Effects were estimated using conditional logistic regression.

Results: Multivariable negative binomial regression identified elevated IMD risk with increasing influenza A activity (per 100 case increase, incidence rate ratio = 1.18, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.06, 1.31). In case-crossover models, increasing weekly influenza A activity was associated with an acute increase in the risk of IMD (per 100 case increase, odds ratio (OR)  = 2.03, 95% CI: 1.28 to 3.23). Increasing weekly RSV activity was associated with increased risk of IMD after adjusting for RSV activity in the previous 3 weeks (per 100 case increase, OR = 4.31, 95% CI: 1.14, 16.32). No change in disease risk was seen with increasing influenza B activity.

Conclusions: We have identified an acute effect of influenza A and RSV activity on IMD risk. If confirmed, these finding suggest that influenza vaccination may have the indirect benefit of reducing IMD risk.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Annualized rates of invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) (right axis) and influenza A, influenza B, and RSV (left axis) between 2000 and 2006.IMD cases are for reported Central Ontario, while influenza A and B activity is reported for the Greater Toronto Area, and RSV activity is reported for the province of Ontario.
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pone-0015493-g002: Annualized rates of invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) (right axis) and influenza A, influenza B, and RSV (left axis) between 2000 and 2006.IMD cases are for reported Central Ontario, while influenza A and B activity is reported for the Greater Toronto Area, and RSV activity is reported for the province of Ontario.

Mentions: Influenza A, influenza B, and RSV all showed strong winter and spring time seasonality, with annual shifts in the timing and height of peak activity during the study period (Figure 2). Annual periodicity was observed for RSV, with maximum autocorrelation observed at week 52 (autocorrelation coefficient = 0.71). For influenza B, maximum autocorrelation was observed at week 51 (autocorrelation coefficient = 0.43). Periodicity of influenza A was less regular, with maximum autocorrelation observed at week 60 (autocorrelation coefficient = 0.33). Negative binomial models also showed strong statistical evidence for annual oscillation for all three respiratory viruses (P <0.001).


Respiratory virus infection and risk of invasive meningococcal disease in central Ontario, Canada.

Tuite AR, Kinlin LM, Kuster SP, Jamieson F, Kwong JC, McGeer A, Fisman DN - PLoS ONE (2010)

Annualized rates of invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) (right axis) and influenza A, influenza B, and RSV (left axis) between 2000 and 2006.IMD cases are for reported Central Ontario, while influenza A and B activity is reported for the Greater Toronto Area, and RSV activity is reported for the province of Ontario.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2984510&req=5

pone-0015493-g002: Annualized rates of invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) (right axis) and influenza A, influenza B, and RSV (left axis) between 2000 and 2006.IMD cases are for reported Central Ontario, while influenza A and B activity is reported for the Greater Toronto Area, and RSV activity is reported for the province of Ontario.
Mentions: Influenza A, influenza B, and RSV all showed strong winter and spring time seasonality, with annual shifts in the timing and height of peak activity during the study period (Figure 2). Annual periodicity was observed for RSV, with maximum autocorrelation observed at week 52 (autocorrelation coefficient = 0.71). For influenza B, maximum autocorrelation was observed at week 51 (autocorrelation coefficient = 0.43). Periodicity of influenza A was less regular, with maximum autocorrelation observed at week 60 (autocorrelation coefficient = 0.33). Negative binomial models also showed strong statistical evidence for annual oscillation for all three respiratory viruses (P <0.001).

Bottom Line: Increasing weekly RSV activity was associated with increased risk of IMD after adjusting for RSV activity in the previous 3 weeks (per 100 case increase, OR = 4.31, 95% CI: 1.14, 16.32).We have identified an acute effect of influenza A and RSV activity on IMD risk.If confirmed, these finding suggest that influenza vaccination may have the indirect benefit of reducing IMD risk.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Dalla Lana School of Public Health, University of Toronto, Toronto, Canada.

ABSTRACT

Background: In temperate climates, invasive meningococcal disease (IMD) incidence tends to coincide with or closely follow peak incidence of influenza virus infection; at a seasonal level, increased influenza activity frequently correlates with increased seasonal risk of IMD.

Methods: We evaluated 240 cases of IMD reported in central Ontario, Canada, from 2000 to 2006. Associations between environmental and virological (influenza A, influenza B and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)) exposures and IMD incidence were evaluated using negative binomial regression models controlling for seasonal oscillation. Acute effects of weekly respiratory virus activity on IMD risk were evaluated using a matched-period case-crossover design with random directionality of control selection. Effects were estimated using conditional logistic regression.

Results: Multivariable negative binomial regression identified elevated IMD risk with increasing influenza A activity (per 100 case increase, incidence rate ratio = 1.18, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.06, 1.31). In case-crossover models, increasing weekly influenza A activity was associated with an acute increase in the risk of IMD (per 100 case increase, odds ratio (OR)  = 2.03, 95% CI: 1.28 to 3.23). Increasing weekly RSV activity was associated with increased risk of IMD after adjusting for RSV activity in the previous 3 weeks (per 100 case increase, OR = 4.31, 95% CI: 1.14, 16.32). No change in disease risk was seen with increasing influenza B activity.

Conclusions: We have identified an acute effect of influenza A and RSV activity on IMD risk. If confirmed, these finding suggest that influenza vaccination may have the indirect benefit of reducing IMD risk.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus