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A comparative analysis shows morphofunctional differences between the rat and mouse melanin-concentrating hormone systems.

Croizier S, Franchi-Bernard G, Colard C, Poncet F, La Roche A, Risold PY - PLoS ONE (2010)

Bottom Line: Sub-populations of neurons producing melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) are characterized by distinct projection patterns, birthdates and CART/NK3 expression in rat.Evidence for such sub-populations has not been reported in other species.Furthermore, divergences in the distribution of MCH axons were observed, in particular in the ventromedial hypothalamus.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculté de Médecine et de Pharmacie, Université de Franche-Comté, Besançon, France.

ABSTRACT
Sub-populations of neurons producing melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) are characterized by distinct projection patterns, birthdates and CART/NK3 expression in rat. Evidence for such sub-populations has not been reported in other species. However, given that genetically engineered mouse lines are now commonly used as experimental models, a better characterization of the anatomy and morphofunctionnal organization of MCH system in this species is then necessary. Combining multiple immunohistochemistry experiments with in situ hybridization, tract tracing or BrdU injections, evidence supporting the hypothesis that rat and mouse MCH systems are not identical was obtained: sub-populations of MCH neurons also exist in mouse, but their relative abundance is different. Furthermore, divergences in the distribution of MCH axons were observed, in particular in the ventromedial hypothalamus. These differences suggest that rat and mouse MCH neurons are differentially involved in anatomical networks that control feeding and the sleep/wake cycle.

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MCH axons in the Globus Pallidus.(A–C) Photomicrographs to illustrate the MCH innervation of the mouse globus pallidus (GP). MCH axons labeled by the NEI-AS (A) or sMCH-AS (C, green labeling) are observed throughout the nucleus. Medial (GPm) and lateral (GPl) parts are innervated. GPm contains few parvalbumine (Parv)-containing cell bodies, while GPl contains many such neurons (B, red labeling in C). MCH axons are seen close to Parv neurons in the GPl: insert in B is a confocal image showing a MCH axon (green) innervating a Parv perikarya (red). (D) Double labeling for MCH/Parv in rat globus pallidus. Only medial regions of the GP were innervated by MCH fibers, while lateral parts of the nucleus do not contain a MCH innervation. (E) Photomicrograph showing intense NEI innervations of the mouse subthalamic nucleus (STN).
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pone-0015471-g007: MCH axons in the Globus Pallidus.(A–C) Photomicrographs to illustrate the MCH innervation of the mouse globus pallidus (GP). MCH axons labeled by the NEI-AS (A) or sMCH-AS (C, green labeling) are observed throughout the nucleus. Medial (GPm) and lateral (GPl) parts are innervated. GPm contains few parvalbumine (Parv)-containing cell bodies, while GPl contains many such neurons (B, red labeling in C). MCH axons are seen close to Parv neurons in the GPl: insert in B is a confocal image showing a MCH axon (green) innervating a Parv perikarya (red). (D) Double labeling for MCH/Parv in rat globus pallidus. Only medial regions of the GP were innervated by MCH fibers, while lateral parts of the nucleus do not contain a MCH innervation. (E) Photomicrograph showing intense NEI innervations of the mouse subthalamic nucleus (STN).

Mentions: In the pallidum, both medial and lateral parts of the globus pallidus contained a dense MCH innervation in the mouse brain (Figure 7). The lateral part is characterized by the presence of parvalbumin-containing cell bodies in contrast to the medial globus pallidus, which is poor in parvalbumin-expressing cells [22]. Using a double immunocytochemical approach, MCH axons were observed in the immediate vicinity of parvalbumin cells, suggesting axosomatic synaptic contacts (Figure 7A–C). On the rat material, although both pallidal compartments exist, only the very medial globus pallidus contained a dense MCH input, while lateral parts of the nucleus contained only sparse passing MCH axons (Figure 7D). The subthalamic nucleus, which is anatomically related to the globus pallidus, was intensely innervated by MCH axons in both rat and mouse (Figure 7E).


A comparative analysis shows morphofunctional differences between the rat and mouse melanin-concentrating hormone systems.

Croizier S, Franchi-Bernard G, Colard C, Poncet F, La Roche A, Risold PY - PLoS ONE (2010)

MCH axons in the Globus Pallidus.(A–C) Photomicrographs to illustrate the MCH innervation of the mouse globus pallidus (GP). MCH axons labeled by the NEI-AS (A) or sMCH-AS (C, green labeling) are observed throughout the nucleus. Medial (GPm) and lateral (GPl) parts are innervated. GPm contains few parvalbumine (Parv)-containing cell bodies, while GPl contains many such neurons (B, red labeling in C). MCH axons are seen close to Parv neurons in the GPl: insert in B is a confocal image showing a MCH axon (green) innervating a Parv perikarya (red). (D) Double labeling for MCH/Parv in rat globus pallidus. Only medial regions of the GP were innervated by MCH fibers, while lateral parts of the nucleus do not contain a MCH innervation. (E) Photomicrograph showing intense NEI innervations of the mouse subthalamic nucleus (STN).
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2984507&req=5

pone-0015471-g007: MCH axons in the Globus Pallidus.(A–C) Photomicrographs to illustrate the MCH innervation of the mouse globus pallidus (GP). MCH axons labeled by the NEI-AS (A) or sMCH-AS (C, green labeling) are observed throughout the nucleus. Medial (GPm) and lateral (GPl) parts are innervated. GPm contains few parvalbumine (Parv)-containing cell bodies, while GPl contains many such neurons (B, red labeling in C). MCH axons are seen close to Parv neurons in the GPl: insert in B is a confocal image showing a MCH axon (green) innervating a Parv perikarya (red). (D) Double labeling for MCH/Parv in rat globus pallidus. Only medial regions of the GP were innervated by MCH fibers, while lateral parts of the nucleus do not contain a MCH innervation. (E) Photomicrograph showing intense NEI innervations of the mouse subthalamic nucleus (STN).
Mentions: In the pallidum, both medial and lateral parts of the globus pallidus contained a dense MCH innervation in the mouse brain (Figure 7). The lateral part is characterized by the presence of parvalbumin-containing cell bodies in contrast to the medial globus pallidus, which is poor in parvalbumin-expressing cells [22]. Using a double immunocytochemical approach, MCH axons were observed in the immediate vicinity of parvalbumin cells, suggesting axosomatic synaptic contacts (Figure 7A–C). On the rat material, although both pallidal compartments exist, only the very medial globus pallidus contained a dense MCH input, while lateral parts of the nucleus contained only sparse passing MCH axons (Figure 7D). The subthalamic nucleus, which is anatomically related to the globus pallidus, was intensely innervated by MCH axons in both rat and mouse (Figure 7E).

Bottom Line: Sub-populations of neurons producing melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) are characterized by distinct projection patterns, birthdates and CART/NK3 expression in rat.Evidence for such sub-populations has not been reported in other species.Furthermore, divergences in the distribution of MCH axons were observed, in particular in the ventromedial hypothalamus.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculté de Médecine et de Pharmacie, Université de Franche-Comté, Besançon, France.

ABSTRACT
Sub-populations of neurons producing melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) are characterized by distinct projection patterns, birthdates and CART/NK3 expression in rat. Evidence for such sub-populations has not been reported in other species. However, given that genetically engineered mouse lines are now commonly used as experimental models, a better characterization of the anatomy and morphofunctionnal organization of MCH system in this species is then necessary. Combining multiple immunohistochemistry experiments with in situ hybridization, tract tracing or BrdU injections, evidence supporting the hypothesis that rat and mouse MCH systems are not identical was obtained: sub-populations of MCH neurons also exist in mouse, but their relative abundance is different. Furthermore, divergences in the distribution of MCH axons were observed, in particular in the ventromedial hypothalamus. These differences suggest that rat and mouse MCH neurons are differentially involved in anatomical networks that control feeding and the sleep/wake cycle.

Show MeSH