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Manufacture of IRDye800CW-coupled Fe3O4 nanoparticles and their applications in cell labeling and in vivo imaging.

Hou Y, Liu Y, Chen Z, Gu N, Wang J - J Nanobiotechnology (2010)

Bottom Line: The results revealed that the cells were efficiently labeled by the nanoparticles, without any significant effect on cell viability.The results demonstrated that the nanoparticles gradually accumulated in liver and kidney regions following injection, reaching maximum concentrations at 6 h post-injection, following which they were gradually removed from these regions.Real-time live-body imaging effectively reported the dynamic process of the biodistribution and clearance of the nanoparticles in vivo.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: State key Laboratory of Bioelectronics, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096, China. wangjinke@seu.edu.cn.

ABSTRACT

Background: In recent years, near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF)-labeled iron nanoparticles have been synthesized and applied in a number of applications, including the labeling of human cells for monitoring the engraftment process, imaging tumors, sensoring the in vivo molecular environment surrounding nanoparticles and tracing their in vivo biodistribution. These studies demonstrate that NIRF-labeled iron nanoparticles provide an efficient probe for cell labeling. Furthermore, the in vivo imaging studies show excellent performance of the NIR fluorophores. However, there is a limited selection of NIRF-labeled iron nanoparticles with an optimal wavelength for imaging around 800 nm, where tissue autofluorescence is minimal. Therefore, it is necessary to develop additional alternative NIRF-labeled iron nanoparticles for application in this area.

Results: This study manufactured 12-nm DMSA-coated Fe3O4 nanoparticles labeled with a near-infrared fluorophore, IRDye800CW (excitation/emission, 774/789 nm), to investigate their applicability in cell labeling and in vivo imaging. The mouse macrophage RAW264.7 was labeled with IRDye800CW-labeled Fe3O4 nanoparticles at concentrations of 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 80 and 100 μg/ml for 24 h. The results revealed that the cells were efficiently labeled by the nanoparticles, without any significant effect on cell viability. The nanoparticles were injected into the mouse via the tail vein, at dosages of 2 or 5 mg/kg body weight, and the mouse was discontinuously imaged for 24 h. The results demonstrated that the nanoparticles gradually accumulated in liver and kidney regions following injection, reaching maximum concentrations at 6 h post-injection, following which they were gradually removed from these regions. After tracing the nanoparticles throughout the body it was revealed that they mainly distributed in three organs, the liver, spleen and kidney. Real-time live-body imaging effectively reported the dynamic process of the biodistribution and clearance of the nanoparticles in vivo.

Conclusion: IRDye800CW-labeled Fe3O4 nanoparticles provide an effective probe for cell-labeling and in vivo imaging.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

NIRF imaging of organs of a IRDy800CW-MNPs-injected mouse. (A) Light images of heart, lung, liver, spleen and kidney of the mouse administered the IRDye800CW-MNPs. (B) NIRF images of the same organs.
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Figure 8: NIRF imaging of organs of a IRDy800CW-MNPs-injected mouse. (A) Light images of heart, lung, liver, spleen and kidney of the mouse administered the IRDye800CW-MNPs. (B) NIRF images of the same organs.

Mentions: To clarify the exact biodistribution of nanoparticles in different organs, the mouse was sacrificed after imaging for 5 days, and the organs, including the heart, lungs, liver, spleen and kidneys were isolated and their NIRF signal was measured. The results revealed that the IRDy800CW-MNPs mainly distributed in the liver, spleen and kidneys (Figure 8), with minimal distribution in the heart and lungs. This agrees with the results of whole body imaging. It can be found that the intense NIRF signal in the liver region, as measured by live-body imaging, actually comes from two organs, the liver and spleen. The liver is the largest organ in the body of a mouse and the spleen is far smaller, but the spleen is closely attached to the liver; therefore, it cannot be discerned from the liver in the live-body imaging. However, the organ imaging clearly revealed its importance in evaluating the biodistribution of the nanoparticles. Taken together, the individual NIRF imaging of organs is an important supplement to live-body imaging, as it revealed that the in vivo biodistribution and clearance of the MNPs mainly related to these three organs.


Manufacture of IRDye800CW-coupled Fe3O4 nanoparticles and their applications in cell labeling and in vivo imaging.

Hou Y, Liu Y, Chen Z, Gu N, Wang J - J Nanobiotechnology (2010)

NIRF imaging of organs of a IRDy800CW-MNPs-injected mouse. (A) Light images of heart, lung, liver, spleen and kidney of the mouse administered the IRDye800CW-MNPs. (B) NIRF images of the same organs.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2984479&req=5

Figure 8: NIRF imaging of organs of a IRDy800CW-MNPs-injected mouse. (A) Light images of heart, lung, liver, spleen and kidney of the mouse administered the IRDye800CW-MNPs. (B) NIRF images of the same organs.
Mentions: To clarify the exact biodistribution of nanoparticles in different organs, the mouse was sacrificed after imaging for 5 days, and the organs, including the heart, lungs, liver, spleen and kidneys were isolated and their NIRF signal was measured. The results revealed that the IRDy800CW-MNPs mainly distributed in the liver, spleen and kidneys (Figure 8), with minimal distribution in the heart and lungs. This agrees with the results of whole body imaging. It can be found that the intense NIRF signal in the liver region, as measured by live-body imaging, actually comes from two organs, the liver and spleen. The liver is the largest organ in the body of a mouse and the spleen is far smaller, but the spleen is closely attached to the liver; therefore, it cannot be discerned from the liver in the live-body imaging. However, the organ imaging clearly revealed its importance in evaluating the biodistribution of the nanoparticles. Taken together, the individual NIRF imaging of organs is an important supplement to live-body imaging, as it revealed that the in vivo biodistribution and clearance of the MNPs mainly related to these three organs.

Bottom Line: The results revealed that the cells were efficiently labeled by the nanoparticles, without any significant effect on cell viability.The results demonstrated that the nanoparticles gradually accumulated in liver and kidney regions following injection, reaching maximum concentrations at 6 h post-injection, following which they were gradually removed from these regions.Real-time live-body imaging effectively reported the dynamic process of the biodistribution and clearance of the nanoparticles in vivo.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: State key Laboratory of Bioelectronics, Southeast University, Nanjing 210096, China. wangjinke@seu.edu.cn.

ABSTRACT

Background: In recent years, near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF)-labeled iron nanoparticles have been synthesized and applied in a number of applications, including the labeling of human cells for monitoring the engraftment process, imaging tumors, sensoring the in vivo molecular environment surrounding nanoparticles and tracing their in vivo biodistribution. These studies demonstrate that NIRF-labeled iron nanoparticles provide an efficient probe for cell labeling. Furthermore, the in vivo imaging studies show excellent performance of the NIR fluorophores. However, there is a limited selection of NIRF-labeled iron nanoparticles with an optimal wavelength for imaging around 800 nm, where tissue autofluorescence is minimal. Therefore, it is necessary to develop additional alternative NIRF-labeled iron nanoparticles for application in this area.

Results: This study manufactured 12-nm DMSA-coated Fe3O4 nanoparticles labeled with a near-infrared fluorophore, IRDye800CW (excitation/emission, 774/789 nm), to investigate their applicability in cell labeling and in vivo imaging. The mouse macrophage RAW264.7 was labeled with IRDye800CW-labeled Fe3O4 nanoparticles at concentrations of 20, 30, 40, 50, 60, 80 and 100 μg/ml for 24 h. The results revealed that the cells were efficiently labeled by the nanoparticles, without any significant effect on cell viability. The nanoparticles were injected into the mouse via the tail vein, at dosages of 2 or 5 mg/kg body weight, and the mouse was discontinuously imaged for 24 h. The results demonstrated that the nanoparticles gradually accumulated in liver and kidney regions following injection, reaching maximum concentrations at 6 h post-injection, following which they were gradually removed from these regions. After tracing the nanoparticles throughout the body it was revealed that they mainly distributed in three organs, the liver, spleen and kidney. Real-time live-body imaging effectively reported the dynamic process of the biodistribution and clearance of the nanoparticles in vivo.

Conclusion: IRDye800CW-labeled Fe3O4 nanoparticles provide an effective probe for cell-labeling and in vivo imaging.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus