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Influence of anatomic landmarks in the virtual environment on simulated angled laparoscope navigation.

Buzink SN, Christie LS, Goossens RH, de Ridder H, Jakimowicz JJ - Surg Endosc (2010)

Bottom Line: No significant differences were found between the performances of the experienced participants and the novices on the CN tasks (Mann-Whitney U test, p > 0.05).The task was performed better in an abstract environment than in a virtual environment with anatomic landmarks.More insight is required into the influence and function of different types of intrinsic and extrinsic feedback on the effectiveness of preclinical simulator training.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Industrial Design Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Delft, The Netherlands, s.n.buzink@tudelft.nl

ABSTRACT

Background: The aim of this study is to investigate the influence of the presence of anatomic landmarks on the performance of angled laparoscope navigation on the SimSurgery SEP simulator.

Methods: Twenty-eight experienced laparoscopic surgeons (familiar with 30° angled laparoscope, >100 basic laparoscopic procedures, >5 advanced laparoscopic procedures) and 23 novices (no laparoscopy experience) performed the Camera Navigation task in an abstract virtual environment (CN-box) and in a virtual representation of the lower abdomen (CN-abdomen). They also rated the realism and added value of the virtual environments on seven-point scales.

Results: Within both groups, the CN-box task was accomplished in less time and with shorter tip trajectory than the CN-abdomen task (Wilcoxon test, p < 0.05). No significant differences were found between the performances of the experienced participants and the novices on the CN tasks (Mann-Whitney U test, p > 0.05). In both groups, the CN tasks were perceived as hard work and more challenging than anticipated.

Conclusions: Performance of the angled laparoscope navigation task is influenced by the virtual environment surrounding the exercise. The task was performed better in an abstract environment than in a virtual environment with anatomic landmarks. More insight is required into the influence and function of different types of intrinsic and extrinsic feedback on the effectiveness of preclinical simulator training.

Show MeSH
Average speed per instrument tip during the tasks
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Fig6: Average speed per instrument tip during the tasks

Mentions: In the experienced group, the CN-box task was accomplished in significantly less time (Fig. 3) and with shorter total tip trajectory (Fig. 4) than the CN-abdomen task. The same held for the novice group. No significant differences were found between the CN task in the two different surroundings for the number of targets lost out of view or the average speed per instrument tip (Figs. 5 and 6).Fig. 3


Influence of anatomic landmarks in the virtual environment on simulated angled laparoscope navigation.

Buzink SN, Christie LS, Goossens RH, de Ridder H, Jakimowicz JJ - Surg Endosc (2010)

Average speed per instrument tip during the tasks
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2982952&req=5

Fig6: Average speed per instrument tip during the tasks
Mentions: In the experienced group, the CN-box task was accomplished in significantly less time (Fig. 3) and with shorter total tip trajectory (Fig. 4) than the CN-abdomen task. The same held for the novice group. No significant differences were found between the CN task in the two different surroundings for the number of targets lost out of view or the average speed per instrument tip (Figs. 5 and 6).Fig. 3

Bottom Line: No significant differences were found between the performances of the experienced participants and the novices on the CN tasks (Mann-Whitney U test, p > 0.05).The task was performed better in an abstract environment than in a virtual environment with anatomic landmarks.More insight is required into the influence and function of different types of intrinsic and extrinsic feedback on the effectiveness of preclinical simulator training.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Faculty of Industrial Design Engineering, Delft University of Technology, Delft, The Netherlands, s.n.buzink@tudelft.nl

ABSTRACT

Background: The aim of this study is to investigate the influence of the presence of anatomic landmarks on the performance of angled laparoscope navigation on the SimSurgery SEP simulator.

Methods: Twenty-eight experienced laparoscopic surgeons (familiar with 30° angled laparoscope, >100 basic laparoscopic procedures, >5 advanced laparoscopic procedures) and 23 novices (no laparoscopy experience) performed the Camera Navigation task in an abstract virtual environment (CN-box) and in a virtual representation of the lower abdomen (CN-abdomen). They also rated the realism and added value of the virtual environments on seven-point scales.

Results: Within both groups, the CN-box task was accomplished in less time and with shorter tip trajectory than the CN-abdomen task (Wilcoxon test, p < 0.05). No significant differences were found between the performances of the experienced participants and the novices on the CN tasks (Mann-Whitney U test, p > 0.05). In both groups, the CN tasks were perceived as hard work and more challenging than anticipated.

Conclusions: Performance of the angled laparoscope navigation task is influenced by the virtual environment surrounding the exercise. The task was performed better in an abstract environment than in a virtual environment with anatomic landmarks. More insight is required into the influence and function of different types of intrinsic and extrinsic feedback on the effectiveness of preclinical simulator training.

Show MeSH