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Current surgical training: simultaneous training in open and laparoscopic surgery.

Kano N, Takeshi A, Kusanagi H, Watarai Y, Mike M, Yamada S, Mishima O, Uwafuji S, Kitagawa M, Watanabe H, Kitahama S, Matsuda S, Endo S, Gremillion D - Surg Endosc (2010)

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Consequently, concerns about education for open surgery have appeared, with some educators cautioning that “if so many surgeries are done using laparoscopy, chances for open conventional surgery critically decreases. ” At the early stage of laparoscopic surgery, the prime concern was how to train experienced surgeons to be eligible for laparoscopic surgery... Kimura and Suzuki described training for laparoscopy as follows: The experienced and competent surgeons must learn anatomy specific to laparoscopic surgery for each organ, tactical sensation and hand–eye coordination under a two-dimensional monitor, and knowledge of instruments specific to laparoscopic surgery... The rapid expansion of endoscopic surgery has led to concern about education for conventional open surgery... We conclude that there need be little concern about surgical education in this era of endoscopic surgery... During laparoscopic surgery, they can learn fine anatomy through magnified images on monitors... Some surgeons report that they have started requiring surgical residents to do surgeries as primary surgeons, but not until about the 10th year after graduation... Therefore, the training room in the dry lab at our institution, available anytime to anybody, is working well for educating beginners... The effectiveness of training using bench models has been documented... Recently, more effective training using virtual reality simulators is increasingly reported... In contrast, young surgeons currently learn open and endoscopic surgery in parallel, or they learn laparoscopic surgery first and then learn open surgery (e.g., cholecystectomy)... Funch-Jensen reported that surgery is increasingly reoriented into laparoscopic procedures, and classic open surgery will presumably, with few exceptions, cease to exist in the future... We do not think open surgery will disappear and therefore believe that its skills must be maintained for the future... Simultaneous training of conventional open surgery and endoscopic surgery provides a synergistic effect in the education of surgical residents.

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Hands on training by residents themselves
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Fig1: Hands on training by residents themselves

Mentions: The rapid expansion of endoscopic surgery has led to concern about education for conventional open surgery. We conclude that there need be little concern about surgical education in this era of endoscopic surgery. By experiencing both open and endoscopic surgery, residents currently learn more meticulous anatomy than their senior surgeons learned in their younger days. During laparoscopic surgery, they can learn fine anatomy through magnified images on monitors. The anatomic relationship of the cystic duct and cystic artery seen behind the gallbladder neck can be visualized easily in laparoscopic surgery, a view not provided by open surgery. By experiencing both open and laparoscopic surgery, residents can learn more meticulous operative anatomy and technique, demonstrating a synergistic effect in surgical training (Fig. 1).Fig. 1


Current surgical training: simultaneous training in open and laparoscopic surgery.

Kano N, Takeshi A, Kusanagi H, Watarai Y, Mike M, Yamada S, Mishima O, Uwafuji S, Kitagawa M, Watanabe H, Kitahama S, Matsuda S, Endo S, Gremillion D - Surg Endosc (2010)

Hands on training by residents themselves
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2982949&req=5

Fig1: Hands on training by residents themselves
Mentions: The rapid expansion of endoscopic surgery has led to concern about education for conventional open surgery. We conclude that there need be little concern about surgical education in this era of endoscopic surgery. By experiencing both open and endoscopic surgery, residents currently learn more meticulous anatomy than their senior surgeons learned in their younger days. During laparoscopic surgery, they can learn fine anatomy through magnified images on monitors. The anatomic relationship of the cystic duct and cystic artery seen behind the gallbladder neck can be visualized easily in laparoscopic surgery, a view not provided by open surgery. By experiencing both open and laparoscopic surgery, residents can learn more meticulous operative anatomy and technique, demonstrating a synergistic effect in surgical training (Fig. 1).Fig. 1

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

Consequently, concerns about education for open surgery have appeared, with some educators cautioning that “if so many surgeries are done using laparoscopy, chances for open conventional surgery critically decreases. ” At the early stage of laparoscopic surgery, the prime concern was how to train experienced surgeons to be eligible for laparoscopic surgery... Kimura and Suzuki described training for laparoscopy as follows: The experienced and competent surgeons must learn anatomy specific to laparoscopic surgery for each organ, tactical sensation and hand–eye coordination under a two-dimensional monitor, and knowledge of instruments specific to laparoscopic surgery... The rapid expansion of endoscopic surgery has led to concern about education for conventional open surgery... We conclude that there need be little concern about surgical education in this era of endoscopic surgery... During laparoscopic surgery, they can learn fine anatomy through magnified images on monitors... Some surgeons report that they have started requiring surgical residents to do surgeries as primary surgeons, but not until about the 10th year after graduation... Therefore, the training room in the dry lab at our institution, available anytime to anybody, is working well for educating beginners... The effectiveness of training using bench models has been documented... Recently, more effective training using virtual reality simulators is increasingly reported... In contrast, young surgeons currently learn open and endoscopic surgery in parallel, or they learn laparoscopic surgery first and then learn open surgery (e.g., cholecystectomy)... Funch-Jensen reported that surgery is increasingly reoriented into laparoscopic procedures, and classic open surgery will presumably, with few exceptions, cease to exist in the future... We do not think open surgery will disappear and therefore believe that its skills must be maintained for the future... Simultaneous training of conventional open surgery and endoscopic surgery provides a synergistic effect in the education of surgical residents.

Show MeSH