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The roles of dopamine and related compounds in reward-seeking behavior across animal phyla.

Barron AB, Søvik E, Cornish JL - Front Behav Neurosci (2010)

Bottom Line: The neurobiology of reward-seeking behavioral systems is less well understood in invertebrates, but in many diverse invertebrate groups, reward learning and responses to food rewards also involve dopamine.The obvious exceptions are the arthropods in which the chemically related biogenic amine octopamine has a greater effect on reward learning and reinforcement than dopamine.Here we review the functions of these biogenic amines in behavioral responses to rewards in different animal groups, and discuss these findings in an evolutionary context.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biology, Macquarie University Sydney, NSW, Australia.

ABSTRACT
Motile animals actively seek out and gather resources they find rewarding, and this is an extremely powerful organizer and motivator of animal behavior. Mammalian studies have revealed interconnected neurobiological systems for reward learning, reward assessment, reinforcement and reward-seeking; all involving the biogenic amine dopamine. The neurobiology of reward-seeking behavioral systems is less well understood in invertebrates, but in many diverse invertebrate groups, reward learning and responses to food rewards also involve dopamine. The obvious exceptions are the arthropods in which the chemically related biogenic amine octopamine has a greater effect on reward learning and reinforcement than dopamine. Here we review the functions of these biogenic amines in behavioral responses to rewards in different animal groups, and discuss these findings in an evolutionary context.

No MeSH data available.


Phylogeny of groups discussed in this paper, based on nearly complete ribosomal RNA gene analyses (Mallatt et al., 2010). Discussed phyla represent examples of protostome, deuterostome, and diploblastic groups, yet dopamine is a modulator in the motor systems of all these diverse phyla, and affects responses to rewarding or punishing stimuli in mollusks, platyhelminths, arthropods, nematodes, and chordates.
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Figure 2: Phylogeny of groups discussed in this paper, based on nearly complete ribosomal RNA gene analyses (Mallatt et al., 2010). Discussed phyla represent examples of protostome, deuterostome, and diploblastic groups, yet dopamine is a modulator in the motor systems of all these diverse phyla, and affects responses to rewarding or punishing stimuli in mollusks, platyhelminths, arthropods, nematodes, and chordates.

Mentions: The Nematoda, Platyhelminthes and Mollusca are representatives of three different superphyla within the protostomes (Figure 2). The Chordata are deuterostomes, and a separate lineage from the protostome groups (Figure 2). Despite all this taxonomic diversity dopamine affects behavioral responses to reward and reinforcement in a similar manner. The affects of dopamine on mammalian reward responses have been well reviewed recently (Schultz, 2007), and hence here we consider only the main findings as relevant to this comparative review.


The roles of dopamine and related compounds in reward-seeking behavior across animal phyla.

Barron AB, Søvik E, Cornish JL - Front Behav Neurosci (2010)

Phylogeny of groups discussed in this paper, based on nearly complete ribosomal RNA gene analyses (Mallatt et al., 2010). Discussed phyla represent examples of protostome, deuterostome, and diploblastic groups, yet dopamine is a modulator in the motor systems of all these diverse phyla, and affects responses to rewarding or punishing stimuli in mollusks, platyhelminths, arthropods, nematodes, and chordates.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2967375&req=5

Figure 2: Phylogeny of groups discussed in this paper, based on nearly complete ribosomal RNA gene analyses (Mallatt et al., 2010). Discussed phyla represent examples of protostome, deuterostome, and diploblastic groups, yet dopamine is a modulator in the motor systems of all these diverse phyla, and affects responses to rewarding or punishing stimuli in mollusks, platyhelminths, arthropods, nematodes, and chordates.
Mentions: The Nematoda, Platyhelminthes and Mollusca are representatives of three different superphyla within the protostomes (Figure 2). The Chordata are deuterostomes, and a separate lineage from the protostome groups (Figure 2). Despite all this taxonomic diversity dopamine affects behavioral responses to reward and reinforcement in a similar manner. The affects of dopamine on mammalian reward responses have been well reviewed recently (Schultz, 2007), and hence here we consider only the main findings as relevant to this comparative review.

Bottom Line: The neurobiology of reward-seeking behavioral systems is less well understood in invertebrates, but in many diverse invertebrate groups, reward learning and responses to food rewards also involve dopamine.The obvious exceptions are the arthropods in which the chemically related biogenic amine octopamine has a greater effect on reward learning and reinforcement than dopamine.Here we review the functions of these biogenic amines in behavioral responses to rewards in different animal groups, and discuss these findings in an evolutionary context.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biology, Macquarie University Sydney, NSW, Australia.

ABSTRACT
Motile animals actively seek out and gather resources they find rewarding, and this is an extremely powerful organizer and motivator of animal behavior. Mammalian studies have revealed interconnected neurobiological systems for reward learning, reward assessment, reinforcement and reward-seeking; all involving the biogenic amine dopamine. The neurobiology of reward-seeking behavioral systems is less well understood in invertebrates, but in many diverse invertebrate groups, reward learning and responses to food rewards also involve dopamine. The obvious exceptions are the arthropods in which the chemically related biogenic amine octopamine has a greater effect on reward learning and reinforcement than dopamine. Here we review the functions of these biogenic amines in behavioral responses to rewards in different animal groups, and discuss these findings in an evolutionary context.

No MeSH data available.