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Malignant pulmonary and mediastinal tumors in children: differential diagnoses.

McCarville MB - Cancer Imaging (2010)

Bottom Line: Conventional chest radiography is the most common imaging procedure in children.Knowledge of the differential diagnostic possibilities for chest tumors in children is important for both the pediatric and general radiologist because they differ from adults.The more common pediatric, malignant, mediastinal and pulmonary tumors and the characteristic imaging and clinical features that are useful in distinguishing between them are discussed in this review.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiological Sciences, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN 38105, USA.

ABSTRACT
Conventional chest radiography is the most common imaging procedure in children. When a chest mass is discovered, cross-sectional imaging is often required to accurately localize and characterize the lesion in order to narrow the differential diagnosis. Knowledge of the differential diagnostic possibilities for chest tumors in children is important for both the pediatric and general radiologist because they differ from adults. The more common pediatric, malignant, mediastinal and pulmonary tumors and the characteristic imaging and clinical features that are useful in distinguishing between them are discussed in this review.

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A 2-year-old girl with pleuropulmonary blastoma (PPB). (A) Posterior-anterior chest radiograph shows complete opacification of the right hemithorax. (B) Axial CT, lung window, shows a small right pneumothorax. (C) Axial CT, mediastinal window, shows the large, heterogeneous, predominantly low density, right PPB. These imaging features are typical of PPB.
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Figure 5: A 2-year-old girl with pleuropulmonary blastoma (PPB). (A) Posterior-anterior chest radiograph shows complete opacification of the right hemithorax. (B) Axial CT, lung window, shows a small right pneumothorax. (C) Axial CT, mediastinal window, shows the large, heterogeneous, predominantly low density, right PPB. These imaging features are typical of PPB.

Mentions: Because the diagnosis is often delayed patients tend to present with large masses causing near complete opacification of the hemithorax (Fig. 5). Other imaging features that suggest PPB are right-sided location, peripherally located mass without chest wall invasion, heterogeneously low attenuation on CT, lack of calcification and associated pleural effusion and pneumothorax[16,17]. Pleuropulmonary blastoma may be solitary or multiple with additional lesions occurring synchronously or metachronously[13]. The presence of multiple lesions should suggest the diagnosis of PPB.Figure 5


Malignant pulmonary and mediastinal tumors in children: differential diagnoses.

McCarville MB - Cancer Imaging (2010)

A 2-year-old girl with pleuropulmonary blastoma (PPB). (A) Posterior-anterior chest radiograph shows complete opacification of the right hemithorax. (B) Axial CT, lung window, shows a small right pneumothorax. (C) Axial CT, mediastinal window, shows the large, heterogeneous, predominantly low density, right PPB. These imaging features are typical of PPB.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2967153&req=5

Figure 5: A 2-year-old girl with pleuropulmonary blastoma (PPB). (A) Posterior-anterior chest radiograph shows complete opacification of the right hemithorax. (B) Axial CT, lung window, shows a small right pneumothorax. (C) Axial CT, mediastinal window, shows the large, heterogeneous, predominantly low density, right PPB. These imaging features are typical of PPB.
Mentions: Because the diagnosis is often delayed patients tend to present with large masses causing near complete opacification of the hemithorax (Fig. 5). Other imaging features that suggest PPB are right-sided location, peripherally located mass without chest wall invasion, heterogeneously low attenuation on CT, lack of calcification and associated pleural effusion and pneumothorax[16,17]. Pleuropulmonary blastoma may be solitary or multiple with additional lesions occurring synchronously or metachronously[13]. The presence of multiple lesions should suggest the diagnosis of PPB.Figure 5

Bottom Line: Conventional chest radiography is the most common imaging procedure in children.Knowledge of the differential diagnostic possibilities for chest tumors in children is important for both the pediatric and general radiologist because they differ from adults.The more common pediatric, malignant, mediastinal and pulmonary tumors and the characteristic imaging and clinical features that are useful in distinguishing between them are discussed in this review.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiological Sciences, St. Jude Children's Research Hospital, Memphis, TN 38105, USA.

ABSTRACT
Conventional chest radiography is the most common imaging procedure in children. When a chest mass is discovered, cross-sectional imaging is often required to accurately localize and characterize the lesion in order to narrow the differential diagnosis. Knowledge of the differential diagnostic possibilities for chest tumors in children is important for both the pediatric and general radiologist because they differ from adults. The more common pediatric, malignant, mediastinal and pulmonary tumors and the characteristic imaging and clinical features that are useful in distinguishing between them are discussed in this review.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus