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Proforma-based reporting in rectal cancer.

Taylor F, Mangat N, Swift IR, Brown G - Cancer Imaging (2010)

Bottom Line: The improvements in outcomes associate with the use of preoperative therapy rather than postoperative treatment means that clinical teams are increasingly reliant on imaging to identify high-risk features of disease to determine treatment plans.In the MERCURY study, a standardised scanning technique and the use of reporting proformas enabled consistently accurate assessment and documentation of the prognostic factors.This is now an essential tool to enable our clinical colleagues to make treatment decisions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Mayday University Hospital, Croydon, Surrey, UK.

ABSTRACT
The improvements in outcomes associate with the use of preoperative therapy rather than postoperative treatment means that clinical teams are increasingly reliant on imaging to identify high-risk features of disease to determine treatment plans. For many solid tumours, including rectal cancer, validated techniques have emerged in identifying prognostic factors pre-operatively. In the MERCURY study, a standardised scanning technique and the use of reporting proformas enabled consistently accurate assessment and documentation of the prognostic factors. This is now an essential tool to enable our clinical colleagues to make treatment decisions. In this review, we describe the proforma-based reporting tool that enables a systematic approach to the interpretation of the magnetic resonance images, thereby enabling all the clinically relevant features to be adequately assessed.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Post chemoradiotherapy assessment of tumour regression. For those patients who received preoperative chemoradiotherapy we used a tumour regression grade analysis, grade 1–5, modified from Dworak et al.[9] This is known to be a better predictor for outcome after treatment compared with T stage.
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Figure 10: Post chemoradiotherapy assessment of tumour regression. For those patients who received preoperative chemoradiotherapy we used a tumour regression grade analysis, grade 1–5, modified from Dworak et al.[9] This is known to be a better predictor for outcome after treatment compared with T stage.

Mentions: For those patients who received preoperative chemoradiotherapy we used a tumour regression grade analysis, grade 1–5, modified from Dworak et al.[52]. This is known to be a better predictor for outcome after treatment compared with T stage (Fig. 10)[53].Figure 10


Proforma-based reporting in rectal cancer.

Taylor F, Mangat N, Swift IR, Brown G - Cancer Imaging (2010)

Post chemoradiotherapy assessment of tumour regression. For those patients who received preoperative chemoradiotherapy we used a tumour regression grade analysis, grade 1–5, modified from Dworak et al.[9] This is known to be a better predictor for outcome after treatment compared with T stage.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2967144&req=5

Figure 10: Post chemoradiotherapy assessment of tumour regression. For those patients who received preoperative chemoradiotherapy we used a tumour regression grade analysis, grade 1–5, modified from Dworak et al.[9] This is known to be a better predictor for outcome after treatment compared with T stage.
Mentions: For those patients who received preoperative chemoradiotherapy we used a tumour regression grade analysis, grade 1–5, modified from Dworak et al.[52]. This is known to be a better predictor for outcome after treatment compared with T stage (Fig. 10)[53].Figure 10

Bottom Line: The improvements in outcomes associate with the use of preoperative therapy rather than postoperative treatment means that clinical teams are increasingly reliant on imaging to identify high-risk features of disease to determine treatment plans.In the MERCURY study, a standardised scanning technique and the use of reporting proformas enabled consistently accurate assessment and documentation of the prognostic factors.This is now an essential tool to enable our clinical colleagues to make treatment decisions.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Mayday University Hospital, Croydon, Surrey, UK.

ABSTRACT
The improvements in outcomes associate with the use of preoperative therapy rather than postoperative treatment means that clinical teams are increasingly reliant on imaging to identify high-risk features of disease to determine treatment plans. For many solid tumours, including rectal cancer, validated techniques have emerged in identifying prognostic factors pre-operatively. In the MERCURY study, a standardised scanning technique and the use of reporting proformas enabled consistently accurate assessment and documentation of the prognostic factors. This is now an essential tool to enable our clinical colleagues to make treatment decisions. In this review, we describe the proforma-based reporting tool that enables a systematic approach to the interpretation of the magnetic resonance images, thereby enabling all the clinically relevant features to be adequately assessed.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus