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Multidisciplinary approach to thoracic tissue sampling.

Quint LE - Cancer Imaging (2010)

Bottom Line: When choosing the best method to undertake a biopsy of a lesion in the lung or mediastinum, it is important to consider the entire range of possible options, such as surgical, bronchoscopic/endoscopic, and radiologic techniques.Features to be considered include the anatomic location of the lesion, the amount of tissue needed, cost, availability of specific techniques, safety and risks, and expected diagnostic yield/accuracy.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA.

ABSTRACT
When choosing the best method to undertake a biopsy of a lesion in the lung or mediastinum, it is important to consider the entire range of possible options, such as surgical, bronchoscopic/endoscopic, and radiologic techniques. Features to be considered include the anatomic location of the lesion, the amount of tissue needed, cost, availability of specific techniques, safety and risks, and expected diagnostic yield/accuracy.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

An 82-year-old woman with a spiculated right upper lobe nodule (arrow, a) and an enlarged anterior mediastinal lymph node (arrow, b) at CT. CT-guided biopsy of the lymph node (c) revealed non-small cell lung cancer.
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Figure 3: An 82-year-old woman with a spiculated right upper lobe nodule (arrow, a) and an enlarged anterior mediastinal lymph node (arrow, b) at CT. CT-guided biopsy of the lymph node (c) revealed non-small cell lung cancer.

Mentions: CT-guided mediastinal biopsy[9] is not routine at most institutions; it can be technically difficult due to the proximity of the lesion to vital structures and is generally reserved for large lesions. Possible approaches include parasternal, trans-sternal, paravertebral, subxiphoid, and suprasternal notch routes (Fig. 3). The technique is minimally invasive, yields cytologic or histologic samples, generally requires no sedation and is relatively inexpensive (approximately $2600 USD).Figure 3


Multidisciplinary approach to thoracic tissue sampling.

Quint LE - Cancer Imaging (2010)

An 82-year-old woman with a spiculated right upper lobe nodule (arrow, a) and an enlarged anterior mediastinal lymph node (arrow, b) at CT. CT-guided biopsy of the lymph node (c) revealed non-small cell lung cancer.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2967143&req=5

Figure 3: An 82-year-old woman with a spiculated right upper lobe nodule (arrow, a) and an enlarged anterior mediastinal lymph node (arrow, b) at CT. CT-guided biopsy of the lymph node (c) revealed non-small cell lung cancer.
Mentions: CT-guided mediastinal biopsy[9] is not routine at most institutions; it can be technically difficult due to the proximity of the lesion to vital structures and is generally reserved for large lesions. Possible approaches include parasternal, trans-sternal, paravertebral, subxiphoid, and suprasternal notch routes (Fig. 3). The technique is minimally invasive, yields cytologic or histologic samples, generally requires no sedation and is relatively inexpensive (approximately $2600 USD).Figure 3

Bottom Line: When choosing the best method to undertake a biopsy of a lesion in the lung or mediastinum, it is important to consider the entire range of possible options, such as surgical, bronchoscopic/endoscopic, and radiologic techniques.Features to be considered include the anatomic location of the lesion, the amount of tissue needed, cost, availability of specific techniques, safety and risks, and expected diagnostic yield/accuracy.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA.

ABSTRACT
When choosing the best method to undertake a biopsy of a lesion in the lung or mediastinum, it is important to consider the entire range of possible options, such as surgical, bronchoscopic/endoscopic, and radiologic techniques. Features to be considered include the anatomic location of the lesion, the amount of tissue needed, cost, availability of specific techniques, safety and risks, and expected diagnostic yield/accuracy.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus