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Pelvic incidentalomas.

Gore RM, Newmark GM, Thakrar KH, Mehta UK, Berlin JW - Cancer Imaging (2010)

Bottom Line: These incidental pelvic lesions have created a management dilemma for both clinicians and radiologists.Depending on the clinical setting, these lesions may require no further evaluation, additional immediate or serial follow-up imaging, or surgical intervention.In this review, guidelines concerning the diagnosis and management of some of the more common pelvic incidentalomas are presented.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, North Shore University Health System, University of Chicago, Pritzker School of Medicine, Evanston, IL 60201, USA. rgore@uchicago.edu

ABSTRACT
Recent advances in multi-detector computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and ultrasound have led to the detection of incidental ovarian, uterine, vascular and pelvic nodal abnormalities in both the oncology and non-oncology patient population that in the past remained undiscovered. These incidental pelvic lesions have created a management dilemma for both clinicians and radiologists. Depending on the clinical setting, these lesions may require no further evaluation, additional immediate or serial follow-up imaging, or surgical intervention. In this review, guidelines concerning the diagnosis and management of some of the more common pelvic incidentalomas are presented.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Incidental ovarian cysts (white arrows) are identified during a staging CT scan obtained on this 67-year-old woman with lung cancer. Note the calcified fibroid (black arrow) within the uterus.
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Figure 1: Incidental ovarian cysts (white arrows) are identified during a staging CT scan obtained on this 67-year-old woman with lung cancer. Note the calcified fibroid (black arrow) within the uterus.

Mentions: In the 1980s and 1990s, a number of studies were published based on ultrasound, CT (Fig. 1) and MRI, and concluded that simple cystic lesions are quite common in both pre- and postmenopausal women and that simple cysts less than 5 cm in diameter are not likely to be malignant[12–16].Figure 1


Pelvic incidentalomas.

Gore RM, Newmark GM, Thakrar KH, Mehta UK, Berlin JW - Cancer Imaging (2010)

Incidental ovarian cysts (white arrows) are identified during a staging CT scan obtained on this 67-year-old woman with lung cancer. Note the calcified fibroid (black arrow) within the uterus.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2967139&req=5

Figure 1: Incidental ovarian cysts (white arrows) are identified during a staging CT scan obtained on this 67-year-old woman with lung cancer. Note the calcified fibroid (black arrow) within the uterus.
Mentions: In the 1980s and 1990s, a number of studies were published based on ultrasound, CT (Fig. 1) and MRI, and concluded that simple cystic lesions are quite common in both pre- and postmenopausal women and that simple cysts less than 5 cm in diameter are not likely to be malignant[12–16].Figure 1

Bottom Line: These incidental pelvic lesions have created a management dilemma for both clinicians and radiologists.Depending on the clinical setting, these lesions may require no further evaluation, additional immediate or serial follow-up imaging, or surgical intervention.In this review, guidelines concerning the diagnosis and management of some of the more common pelvic incidentalomas are presented.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, North Shore University Health System, University of Chicago, Pritzker School of Medicine, Evanston, IL 60201, USA. rgore@uchicago.edu

ABSTRACT
Recent advances in multi-detector computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and ultrasound have led to the detection of incidental ovarian, uterine, vascular and pelvic nodal abnormalities in both the oncology and non-oncology patient population that in the past remained undiscovered. These incidental pelvic lesions have created a management dilemma for both clinicians and radiologists. Depending on the clinical setting, these lesions may require no further evaluation, additional immediate or serial follow-up imaging, or surgical intervention. In this review, guidelines concerning the diagnosis and management of some of the more common pelvic incidentalomas are presented.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus