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[(18)F]2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose PET/CT in mediastinal masses.

Rankin S - Cancer Imaging (2010)

Bottom Line: Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are excellent modalities for the localization of mediastinal masses and there are often features that may allow the correct diagnosis to be made.However, CT and MRI cannot usually assess the aggressiveness of masses or identify viable tumour in residual masses after chemotherapy.Metabolic imaging using [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography/CT, although not required in many cases, may be helpful for further characterization of masses and to guide the most appropriate site for biopsy.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Guy's Hospital, St Thomas Street, London, UK. sheila.rankin@gstt.nhs.uk

ABSTRACT
Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are excellent modalities for the localization of mediastinal masses and there are often features that may allow the correct diagnosis to be made. However, CT and MRI cannot usually assess the aggressiveness of masses or identify viable tumour in residual masses after chemotherapy. Metabolic imaging using [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography/CT, although not required in many cases, may be helpful for further characterization of masses and to guide the most appropriate site for biopsy.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

NSGCT. Uptake on PET/CT identifies viable residual tumour in the posterior mediastinal mass.
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Figure 3: NSGCT. Uptake on PET/CT identifies viable residual tumour in the posterior mediastinal mass.

Mentions: These comprise a heterogeneous group of tumours and have a poorer prognosis than mediastinal seminomas (5-year survival 48% compared with 88%). They are usually diagnosed and staged with CT with markers helpful in diagnosis. Again these tumours show high uptake on FDG-PET, but it is not usually required for staging (Fig. 3). Following first-line treatment, residual masses remain in approximately 40% of patients consisting of necrosis in 40%, mature teratoma in 40% and viable tumour in 20%. Mature teratoma is chemotherapy resistant and surgical resection is required. In a large study of NSGCTs with residual masses and histological confirmation[19] the sensitivity and specificity of FDG-PET for viable tumour was 70% and 48% with a PPV of 59%, which was not dissimilar to CT, and FDG-PET/CT appears to offer no advantage over conventional imaging or markers.Figure 3


[(18)F]2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose PET/CT in mediastinal masses.

Rankin S - Cancer Imaging (2010)

NSGCT. Uptake on PET/CT identifies viable residual tumour in the posterior mediastinal mass.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2967136&req=5

Figure 3: NSGCT. Uptake on PET/CT identifies viable residual tumour in the posterior mediastinal mass.
Mentions: These comprise a heterogeneous group of tumours and have a poorer prognosis than mediastinal seminomas (5-year survival 48% compared with 88%). They are usually diagnosed and staged with CT with markers helpful in diagnosis. Again these tumours show high uptake on FDG-PET, but it is not usually required for staging (Fig. 3). Following first-line treatment, residual masses remain in approximately 40% of patients consisting of necrosis in 40%, mature teratoma in 40% and viable tumour in 20%. Mature teratoma is chemotherapy resistant and surgical resection is required. In a large study of NSGCTs with residual masses and histological confirmation[19] the sensitivity and specificity of FDG-PET for viable tumour was 70% and 48% with a PPV of 59%, which was not dissimilar to CT, and FDG-PET/CT appears to offer no advantage over conventional imaging or markers.Figure 3

Bottom Line: Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are excellent modalities for the localization of mediastinal masses and there are often features that may allow the correct diagnosis to be made.However, CT and MRI cannot usually assess the aggressiveness of masses or identify viable tumour in residual masses after chemotherapy.Metabolic imaging using [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography/CT, although not required in many cases, may be helpful for further characterization of masses and to guide the most appropriate site for biopsy.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Guy's Hospital, St Thomas Street, London, UK. sheila.rankin@gstt.nhs.uk

ABSTRACT
Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are excellent modalities for the localization of mediastinal masses and there are often features that may allow the correct diagnosis to be made. However, CT and MRI cannot usually assess the aggressiveness of masses or identify viable tumour in residual masses after chemotherapy. Metabolic imaging using [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography/CT, although not required in many cases, may be helpful for further characterization of masses and to guide the most appropriate site for biopsy.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus