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[(18)F]2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose PET/CT in mediastinal masses.

Rankin S - Cancer Imaging (2010)

Bottom Line: Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are excellent modalities for the localization of mediastinal masses and there are often features that may allow the correct diagnosis to be made.However, CT and MRI cannot usually assess the aggressiveness of masses or identify viable tumour in residual masses after chemotherapy.Metabolic imaging using [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography/CT, although not required in many cases, may be helpful for further characterization of masses and to guide the most appropriate site for biopsy.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Guy's Hospital, St Thomas Street, London, UK. sheila.rankin@gstt.nhs.uk

ABSTRACT
Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are excellent modalities for the localization of mediastinal masses and there are often features that may allow the correct diagnosis to be made. However, CT and MRI cannot usually assess the aggressiveness of masses or identify viable tumour in residual masses after chemotherapy. Metabolic imaging using [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography/CT, although not required in many cases, may be helpful for further characterization of masses and to guide the most appropriate site for biopsy.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

MPNST. Non-homogeneous uptake on PET/CT. Biopsy should be directed to the posterior portion of the tumour.
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Figure 2: MPNST. Non-homogeneous uptake on PET/CT. Biopsy should be directed to the posterior portion of the tumour.

Mentions: FDG-PET has been found to be useful in other sarcomas[12] with the SUV used for risk assessment and as an independent predictor of survival and disease-free progression. In MPNST, FDG-PET is not only sensitive in the detection of malignant transformation (95% sensitivity, 72% specificity)[13] but also provides prognostic information with tumours with an SUV >3 having a shortened survival time compared with those with an SUV <3 (13 months vs 52 months)[14]. Wharby et al.[15] studied 69 patients with FDG-PET/CT with imaging performed at 90 and 240 min after injection. Using an SUVmax of 3.5 on delayed imaging for malignancy, these authors reported a sensitivity of 97% with a specificity of 87%. Lesions with an SUVmax <2.5 should be considered benign and lesions between 2.5 and 3.5 should be kept under review. These authors also found that the SUVmax of MPNSTs increased significantly with time unlike benign lesions, and that there was a correlation between SUVmax and grade of tumour (Fig. 2).Figure 2


[(18)F]2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose PET/CT in mediastinal masses.

Rankin S - Cancer Imaging (2010)

MPNST. Non-homogeneous uptake on PET/CT. Biopsy should be directed to the posterior portion of the tumour.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2967136&req=5

Figure 2: MPNST. Non-homogeneous uptake on PET/CT. Biopsy should be directed to the posterior portion of the tumour.
Mentions: FDG-PET has been found to be useful in other sarcomas[12] with the SUV used for risk assessment and as an independent predictor of survival and disease-free progression. In MPNST, FDG-PET is not only sensitive in the detection of malignant transformation (95% sensitivity, 72% specificity)[13] but also provides prognostic information with tumours with an SUV >3 having a shortened survival time compared with those with an SUV <3 (13 months vs 52 months)[14]. Wharby et al.[15] studied 69 patients with FDG-PET/CT with imaging performed at 90 and 240 min after injection. Using an SUVmax of 3.5 on delayed imaging for malignancy, these authors reported a sensitivity of 97% with a specificity of 87%. Lesions with an SUVmax <2.5 should be considered benign and lesions between 2.5 and 3.5 should be kept under review. These authors also found that the SUVmax of MPNSTs increased significantly with time unlike benign lesions, and that there was a correlation between SUVmax and grade of tumour (Fig. 2).Figure 2

Bottom Line: Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are excellent modalities for the localization of mediastinal masses and there are often features that may allow the correct diagnosis to be made.However, CT and MRI cannot usually assess the aggressiveness of masses or identify viable tumour in residual masses after chemotherapy.Metabolic imaging using [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography/CT, although not required in many cases, may be helpful for further characterization of masses and to guide the most appropriate site for biopsy.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Guy's Hospital, St Thomas Street, London, UK. sheila.rankin@gstt.nhs.uk

ABSTRACT
Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are excellent modalities for the localization of mediastinal masses and there are often features that may allow the correct diagnosis to be made. However, CT and MRI cannot usually assess the aggressiveness of masses or identify viable tumour in residual masses after chemotherapy. Metabolic imaging using [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography/CT, although not required in many cases, may be helpful for further characterization of masses and to guide the most appropriate site for biopsy.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus