Limits...
[(18)F]2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose PET/CT in mediastinal masses.

Rankin S - Cancer Imaging (2010)

Bottom Line: Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are excellent modalities for the localization of mediastinal masses and there are often features that may allow the correct diagnosis to be made.However, CT and MRI cannot usually assess the aggressiveness of masses or identify viable tumour in residual masses after chemotherapy.Metabolic imaging using [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography/CT, although not required in many cases, may be helpful for further characterization of masses and to guide the most appropriate site for biopsy.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Guy's Hospital, St Thomas Street, London, UK. sheila.rankin@gstt.nhs.uk

ABSTRACT
Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are excellent modalities for the localization of mediastinal masses and there are often features that may allow the correct diagnosis to be made. However, CT and MRI cannot usually assess the aggressiveness of masses or identify viable tumour in residual masses after chemotherapy. Metabolic imaging using [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography/CT, although not required in many cases, may be helpful for further characterization of masses and to guide the most appropriate site for biopsy.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Thymic hyperplasia. Characteristic uptake on FDG-PET/CT.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection


getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2967136&req=5

Figure 1: Thymic hyperplasia. Characteristic uptake on FDG-PET/CT.

Mentions: Changes in thymic size occur in response to sepsis, congenital heart disease, use of steroids and following chemotherapy and radiotherapy with re-growth occurring after recovery or following the termination of chemotherapy or steroids. The thymic volume may increase by 50% in thymic hyperplasia (Fig. 1) and is thought to be a rebound phenomenon with the thymus infiltrated by lymph follicles with large nuclei and plasma cells. Rebound thymic hyperplasia may last for several years after the completion of chemotherapy. It is important to differentiate thymic hyperplasia from ongoing or recurrent disease, especially in patients with lymphoma. The uptake in the normal thymus is variable with reported standardized uptake values (SUVs) ranging from 1.8 to 3.6; values greater than 4 are of concern. However, in a recent study 44% of patients with thymic hyperplasia following chemotherapy had an SUVmax of greater than 4[1].Figure 1


[(18)F]2-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose PET/CT in mediastinal masses.

Rankin S - Cancer Imaging (2010)

Thymic hyperplasia. Characteristic uptake on FDG-PET/CT.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2967136&req=5

Figure 1: Thymic hyperplasia. Characteristic uptake on FDG-PET/CT.
Mentions: Changes in thymic size occur in response to sepsis, congenital heart disease, use of steroids and following chemotherapy and radiotherapy with re-growth occurring after recovery or following the termination of chemotherapy or steroids. The thymic volume may increase by 50% in thymic hyperplasia (Fig. 1) and is thought to be a rebound phenomenon with the thymus infiltrated by lymph follicles with large nuclei and plasma cells. Rebound thymic hyperplasia may last for several years after the completion of chemotherapy. It is important to differentiate thymic hyperplasia from ongoing or recurrent disease, especially in patients with lymphoma. The uptake in the normal thymus is variable with reported standardized uptake values (SUVs) ranging from 1.8 to 3.6; values greater than 4 are of concern. However, in a recent study 44% of patients with thymic hyperplasia following chemotherapy had an SUVmax of greater than 4[1].Figure 1

Bottom Line: Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are excellent modalities for the localization of mediastinal masses and there are often features that may allow the correct diagnosis to be made.However, CT and MRI cannot usually assess the aggressiveness of masses or identify viable tumour in residual masses after chemotherapy.Metabolic imaging using [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography/CT, although not required in many cases, may be helpful for further characterization of masses and to guide the most appropriate site for biopsy.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Radiology, Guy's Hospital, St Thomas Street, London, UK. sheila.rankin@gstt.nhs.uk

ABSTRACT
Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are excellent modalities for the localization of mediastinal masses and there are often features that may allow the correct diagnosis to be made. However, CT and MRI cannot usually assess the aggressiveness of masses or identify viable tumour in residual masses after chemotherapy. Metabolic imaging using [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography/CT, although not required in many cases, may be helpful for further characterization of masses and to guide the most appropriate site for biopsy.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus