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Nonoperative management of a sagittal coracoid fracture with a concomitant acromioclavicular joint separation.

Thomas K, Ng VY, Bishop J - Int J Shoulder Surg (2010)

Bottom Line: Separation of the acromioclavicular joint in conjunction with a coracoid fracture is a rare injury.Treatment decisions are traditionally based on the level of the fracture, the status of the coracoclavicular ligament and the activity level of the patient.We present a novel coracoid fracture pattern treated nonoperatively in a young, active patient and a thorough review of the literature regarding this topic.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Sports Medicine Center, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43221, USA.

ABSTRACT
Separation of the acromioclavicular joint in conjunction with a coracoid fracture is a rare injury. Treatment decisions are traditionally based on the level of the fracture, the status of the coracoclavicular ligament and the activity level of the patient. We present a novel coracoid fracture pattern treated nonoperatively in a young, active patient and a thorough review of the literature regarding this topic.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Axial computed tomography image demonstrates healing of the fracture at 3 months postinjury
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Figure 0003: Axial computed tomography image demonstrates healing of the fracture at 3 months postinjury

Mentions: The patient was placed in a sling and swathe, instructed to ice the shoulder and was given anti-inflammatory medication for pain. She was allowed to start gentle pendulum exercises 2 weeks post injury. After 6 weeks of immobilization, she was gradually progressed in her range of motion in all directions. A gentle rehabilitation program was started and once she was comfortable, a strengthening program progressed over the next 6 weeks. At 3 months, the patient was completely pain free and nontender to palpation. There was no AC instability on exam and she had full range of motion and strength. Repeat radiographs and CT scan demonstrated that the fracture was united [Figure 3 a and b]. The patient was released to return to full activities without restrictions.


Nonoperative management of a sagittal coracoid fracture with a concomitant acromioclavicular joint separation.

Thomas K, Ng VY, Bishop J - Int J Shoulder Surg (2010)

Axial computed tomography image demonstrates healing of the fracture at 3 months postinjury
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2966750&req=5

Figure 0003: Axial computed tomography image demonstrates healing of the fracture at 3 months postinjury
Mentions: The patient was placed in a sling and swathe, instructed to ice the shoulder and was given anti-inflammatory medication for pain. She was allowed to start gentle pendulum exercises 2 weeks post injury. After 6 weeks of immobilization, she was gradually progressed in her range of motion in all directions. A gentle rehabilitation program was started and once she was comfortable, a strengthening program progressed over the next 6 weeks. At 3 months, the patient was completely pain free and nontender to palpation. There was no AC instability on exam and she had full range of motion and strength. Repeat radiographs and CT scan demonstrated that the fracture was united [Figure 3 a and b]. The patient was released to return to full activities without restrictions.

Bottom Line: Separation of the acromioclavicular joint in conjunction with a coracoid fracture is a rare injury.Treatment decisions are traditionally based on the level of the fracture, the status of the coracoclavicular ligament and the activity level of the patient.We present a novel coracoid fracture pattern treated nonoperatively in a young, active patient and a thorough review of the literature regarding this topic.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Sports Medicine Center, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43221, USA.

ABSTRACT
Separation of the acromioclavicular joint in conjunction with a coracoid fracture is a rare injury. Treatment decisions are traditionally based on the level of the fracture, the status of the coracoclavicular ligament and the activity level of the patient. We present a novel coracoid fracture pattern treated nonoperatively in a young, active patient and a thorough review of the literature regarding this topic.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus