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Nonoperative management of a sagittal coracoid fracture with a concomitant acromioclavicular joint separation.

Thomas K, Ng VY, Bishop J - Int J Shoulder Surg (2010)

Bottom Line: Separation of the acromioclavicular joint in conjunction with a coracoid fracture is a rare injury.Treatment decisions are traditionally based on the level of the fracture, the status of the coracoclavicular ligament and the activity level of the patient.We present a novel coracoid fracture pattern treated nonoperatively in a young, active patient and a thorough review of the literature regarding this topic.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Sports Medicine Center, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43221, USA.

ABSTRACT
Separation of the acromioclavicular joint in conjunction with a coracoid fracture is a rare injury. Treatment decisions are traditionally based on the level of the fracture, the status of the coracoclavicular ligament and the activity level of the patient. We present a novel coracoid fracture pattern treated nonoperatively in a young, active patient and a thorough review of the literature regarding this topic.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Anteroposterior radiograph (a) of the right shoulder demonstrates a coracoid fracture and type III acromioclavicular (AC) separation. It appears that the fracture is through the base of the coracoid process. The scapular lateral radiograph (b) redemonstrates the injury to the AC joint and visualization of the coracoid fracture
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Figure 0001: Anteroposterior radiograph (a) of the right shoulder demonstrates a coracoid fracture and type III acromioclavicular (AC) separation. It appears that the fracture is through the base of the coracoid process. The scapular lateral radiograph (b) redemonstrates the injury to the AC joint and visualization of the coracoid fracture

Mentions: A 22-year-old right hand-dominant female collegiate athlete fell off a horse and landed directly on her right shoulder. She presented to the senior author’s clinic 1 week later, complaining of anterior shoulder pain. She denied any neurovascular complaints or prior history of injury to the shoulder. On an examination, she had ecchymosis and swelling around the AC joint, which was tender to palpation at the AC joint and coracoid process. Range of motion was limited due to pain. The neurovascular and cervical spine exams were normal. Radiographs demonstrated a Type III AC separation with a corresponding coracoid fracture. On x-ray, the fracture appeared to be located at the base of the coracoid [Figure 1]. However, the computed tomography (CT) scan showed that the fracture was not at the base but was in the sagittal plane through half of the coracoid [Figure 2 a and b].


Nonoperative management of a sagittal coracoid fracture with a concomitant acromioclavicular joint separation.

Thomas K, Ng VY, Bishop J - Int J Shoulder Surg (2010)

Anteroposterior radiograph (a) of the right shoulder demonstrates a coracoid fracture and type III acromioclavicular (AC) separation. It appears that the fracture is through the base of the coracoid process. The scapular lateral radiograph (b) redemonstrates the injury to the AC joint and visualization of the coracoid fracture
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2966750&req=5

Figure 0001: Anteroposterior radiograph (a) of the right shoulder demonstrates a coracoid fracture and type III acromioclavicular (AC) separation. It appears that the fracture is through the base of the coracoid process. The scapular lateral radiograph (b) redemonstrates the injury to the AC joint and visualization of the coracoid fracture
Mentions: A 22-year-old right hand-dominant female collegiate athlete fell off a horse and landed directly on her right shoulder. She presented to the senior author’s clinic 1 week later, complaining of anterior shoulder pain. She denied any neurovascular complaints or prior history of injury to the shoulder. On an examination, she had ecchymosis and swelling around the AC joint, which was tender to palpation at the AC joint and coracoid process. Range of motion was limited due to pain. The neurovascular and cervical spine exams were normal. Radiographs demonstrated a Type III AC separation with a corresponding coracoid fracture. On x-ray, the fracture appeared to be located at the base of the coracoid [Figure 1]. However, the computed tomography (CT) scan showed that the fracture was not at the base but was in the sagittal plane through half of the coracoid [Figure 2 a and b].

Bottom Line: Separation of the acromioclavicular joint in conjunction with a coracoid fracture is a rare injury.Treatment decisions are traditionally based on the level of the fracture, the status of the coracoclavicular ligament and the activity level of the patient.We present a novel coracoid fracture pattern treated nonoperatively in a young, active patient and a thorough review of the literature regarding this topic.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Sports Medicine Center, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH 43221, USA.

ABSTRACT
Separation of the acromioclavicular joint in conjunction with a coracoid fracture is a rare injury. Treatment decisions are traditionally based on the level of the fracture, the status of the coracoclavicular ligament and the activity level of the patient. We present a novel coracoid fracture pattern treated nonoperatively in a young, active patient and a thorough review of the literature regarding this topic.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus