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Clinical results and motion analysis following arthroscopic anterior stabilization of the shoulder using bioknotless anchors.

Cooke S, Ennis O, Majeed H, Rahmatalla A, Kathuria V, Wade R - Int J Shoulder Surg (2010)

Bottom Line: Those who were dissatisfied or suffered recurrent symptoms had statistically significant lower constant scores at the final follow up.Our success rate was comparable to similar arthroscopic techniques and results published in the literature.There was very little reduction in range of movement following surgery and the rhythm of shoulder motion, particularly external rotation in abduction was improved.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University Hospital North Staffordshire, Princes Road, Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire, ST4 7LN, UK.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: Traumatic anterior dislocation of the shoulder is a common occurrence increasingly being treated arthroscopically. This study aims to determine the outcome of arthroscopic anterior stabilization using bioknotless anchors and analyze the motion in a subset of these patients.

Materials and methods: The outcome of 20 patients who underwent arthroscopic anterior stabilization using the bioknotless system was studied (average follow-up 26 months). Four of these patients underwent motion analysis of their shoulder pre- and post-operatively.

Results: 15% were dissatisfied following surgery and the recurrence of instability was also 15%. Those who were dissatisfied or suffered recurrent symptoms had statistically significant lower constant scores at the final follow up. Pre-operative motion analysis showed a disordered rhythm of shoulder rotation which was corrected following surgery with minimal loss of range of motion.

Conclusions: Our success rate was comparable to similar arthroscopic techniques and results published in the literature. Patient satisfaction depended more on return to usual activities than recurrence of symptoms. There was very little reduction in range of movement following surgery and the rhythm of shoulder motion, particularly external rotation in abduction was improved.

Level of evidence: Four retrospective series.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Fastrack analysis of shoulder rotation in 90° abduction in one patient (a) pre and (b) post operatively. The patient was asked to rotate from neutral to full external rotation (positive degrees) to full internal rotation (negative degrees). Point A1 shows the start of apprehension and B1 the limit of external rotation pre-operatively. The corresponding points post-operatively are indicated (A2 and B2)
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Figure 0003: Fastrack analysis of shoulder rotation in 90° abduction in one patient (a) pre and (b) post operatively. The patient was asked to rotate from neutral to full external rotation (positive degrees) to full internal rotation (negative degrees). Point A1 shows the start of apprehension and B1 the limit of external rotation pre-operatively. The corresponding points post-operatively are indicated (A2 and B2)

Mentions: Of the 16 sportsmen and women, 10 returned to their pre-injury level of participation and 7 of 10 patients returned to heavy physical occupations. Overall, 13 patients returned to their previous activities and 7 did not (35%). We did not encounter any other surgical complications. Fastrack analysis revealed a very slight reduction in range of motion post-operatively. External rotation in abduction measured in the four patients was reduced by 4° ± 4°. The range of motion correlated with that measured clinically. Dynamically, it was noted that the velocity of motion, represented by the gradient of the curve, was much more constant following surgery [Figure 3]. The reasons for this are postulated in the discussion.


Clinical results and motion analysis following arthroscopic anterior stabilization of the shoulder using bioknotless anchors.

Cooke S, Ennis O, Majeed H, Rahmatalla A, Kathuria V, Wade R - Int J Shoulder Surg (2010)

Fastrack analysis of shoulder rotation in 90° abduction in one patient (a) pre and (b) post operatively. The patient was asked to rotate from neutral to full external rotation (positive degrees) to full internal rotation (negative degrees). Point A1 shows the start of apprehension and B1 the limit of external rotation pre-operatively. The corresponding points post-operatively are indicated (A2 and B2)
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2966748&req=5

Figure 0003: Fastrack analysis of shoulder rotation in 90° abduction in one patient (a) pre and (b) post operatively. The patient was asked to rotate from neutral to full external rotation (positive degrees) to full internal rotation (negative degrees). Point A1 shows the start of apprehension and B1 the limit of external rotation pre-operatively. The corresponding points post-operatively are indicated (A2 and B2)
Mentions: Of the 16 sportsmen and women, 10 returned to their pre-injury level of participation and 7 of 10 patients returned to heavy physical occupations. Overall, 13 patients returned to their previous activities and 7 did not (35%). We did not encounter any other surgical complications. Fastrack analysis revealed a very slight reduction in range of motion post-operatively. External rotation in abduction measured in the four patients was reduced by 4° ± 4°. The range of motion correlated with that measured clinically. Dynamically, it was noted that the velocity of motion, represented by the gradient of the curve, was much more constant following surgery [Figure 3]. The reasons for this are postulated in the discussion.

Bottom Line: Those who were dissatisfied or suffered recurrent symptoms had statistically significant lower constant scores at the final follow up.Our success rate was comparable to similar arthroscopic techniques and results published in the literature.There was very little reduction in range of movement following surgery and the rhythm of shoulder motion, particularly external rotation in abduction was improved.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University Hospital North Staffordshire, Princes Road, Stoke-on-Trent, Staffordshire, ST4 7LN, UK.

ABSTRACT

Purpose: Traumatic anterior dislocation of the shoulder is a common occurrence increasingly being treated arthroscopically. This study aims to determine the outcome of arthroscopic anterior stabilization using bioknotless anchors and analyze the motion in a subset of these patients.

Materials and methods: The outcome of 20 patients who underwent arthroscopic anterior stabilization using the bioknotless system was studied (average follow-up 26 months). Four of these patients underwent motion analysis of their shoulder pre- and post-operatively.

Results: 15% were dissatisfied following surgery and the recurrence of instability was also 15%. Those who were dissatisfied or suffered recurrent symptoms had statistically significant lower constant scores at the final follow up. Pre-operative motion analysis showed a disordered rhythm of shoulder rotation which was corrected following surgery with minimal loss of range of motion.

Conclusions: Our success rate was comparable to similar arthroscopic techniques and results published in the literature. Patient satisfaction depended more on return to usual activities than recurrence of symptoms. There was very little reduction in range of movement following surgery and the rhythm of shoulder motion, particularly external rotation in abduction was improved.

Level of evidence: Four retrospective series.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus