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In Memoriam: Rolf K ö tter (1961 – 2010)

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For example, after reading D'Arcy Thompson's On Growth and Form, Rolf amused himself by playing with different geometric transformations of parcellation schemes of the cerebral cortex of the cat... The resulting plots not only served as beautiful, if slightly enigmatic, decorations of his office walls, but also featured in the first and still unique paper on “evolutionary neuro-cartography”... It was only a few months later, in the ascent of his scientific career, that he was diagnosed with a disease that, after a long and courageous battle, eventually proved to be fatal... Out of Rolf's many achievements, two deserve particular mentioning: the development of the CoCoMac connectivity database and the founding of the Brain Connectivity Workshop series... The origins of the CoCoMac database (Collation of Connectivity data on the Macaque brain) date back to 1996, to a PhD project that was supervised by Rolf and which (initially) dealt with large-scale biophysical models of the macaque cortex... Despite the slow and arduous process to build such a database, Rolf's courage and dedication to the vision of CoCoMac did pay off: over the years, CoCoMac, and associated tools, were central to many of his fundamental papers on brain connectivity, ranging from statistical and graph-theoretical analyses of structural connectivity patterns to large-scale models of brain function (e.g., –)... These developments facilitated the use of CoCoMac by research groups all over the world, resulting in numerous seminal publications on organisational principles of brain connectivity and reinforcing the importance of this public database for the neuroscientific community... Rolf was convinced that neurobiological details and formal computational methods were equally important for tackling fundamental questions about brain function... He was continuously searching for mechanisms by which neurobiological and computational scientists could be brought together so that their respective skills and perspectives would enable projects that neither of them could do alone... Inspired by the experience and in partnership with Karl Friston, Rolf organised a workshop on “Functional Brain Connectivity” at Düsseldorf in 2002... This workshop was a tremendous success and resulted in the birth of a community of neuroscientists from different backgrounds working with different methods and at different temporal and spatial scales, but with a shared interest in formal characterisations of neural systems, particularly in terms of connectivity... At the time of ever increasing specialisation in modern science, he was one of the few remaining Renaissance men, with an impressively broad range of knowledge and skills, genuine idealism, and a far-reaching vision... He will be missed dearly, but his impact on systems neuroscience will continue to be felt.

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Rolf Kötter.
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pcbi-1000965-g001: Rolf Kötter.

Mentions: Rolf Kötter was PLoS Computational Biology's Reviews Editor for Neuroscience, 2005–2010.


In Memoriam: Rolf K ö tter (1961 – 2010)
Rolf Kötter.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2965742&req=5

pcbi-1000965-g001: Rolf Kötter.
Mentions: Rolf Kötter was PLoS Computational Biology's Reviews Editor for Neuroscience, 2005–2010.

View Article: PubMed Central

AUTOMATICALLY GENERATED EXCERPT
Please rate it.

For example, after reading D'Arcy Thompson's On Growth and Form, Rolf amused himself by playing with different geometric transformations of parcellation schemes of the cerebral cortex of the cat... The resulting plots not only served as beautiful, if slightly enigmatic, decorations of his office walls, but also featured in the first and still unique paper on “evolutionary neuro-cartography”... It was only a few months later, in the ascent of his scientific career, that he was diagnosed with a disease that, after a long and courageous battle, eventually proved to be fatal... Out of Rolf's many achievements, two deserve particular mentioning: the development of the CoCoMac connectivity database and the founding of the Brain Connectivity Workshop series... The origins of the CoCoMac database (Collation of Connectivity data on the Macaque brain) date back to 1996, to a PhD project that was supervised by Rolf and which (initially) dealt with large-scale biophysical models of the macaque cortex... Despite the slow and arduous process to build such a database, Rolf's courage and dedication to the vision of CoCoMac did pay off: over the years, CoCoMac, and associated tools, were central to many of his fundamental papers on brain connectivity, ranging from statistical and graph-theoretical analyses of structural connectivity patterns to large-scale models of brain function (e.g., –)... These developments facilitated the use of CoCoMac by research groups all over the world, resulting in numerous seminal publications on organisational principles of brain connectivity and reinforcing the importance of this public database for the neuroscientific community... Rolf was convinced that neurobiological details and formal computational methods were equally important for tackling fundamental questions about brain function... He was continuously searching for mechanisms by which neurobiological and computational scientists could be brought together so that their respective skills and perspectives would enable projects that neither of them could do alone... Inspired by the experience and in partnership with Karl Friston, Rolf organised a workshop on “Functional Brain Connectivity” at Düsseldorf in 2002... This workshop was a tremendous success and resulted in the birth of a community of neuroscientists from different backgrounds working with different methods and at different temporal and spatial scales, but with a shared interest in formal characterisations of neural systems, particularly in terms of connectivity... At the time of ever increasing specialisation in modern science, he was one of the few remaining Renaissance men, with an impressively broad range of knowledge and skills, genuine idealism, and a far-reaching vision... He will be missed dearly, but his impact on systems neuroscience will continue to be felt.

No MeSH data available.