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Exploring recruitment, willingness to participate, and retention of low-SES women in stress and depression prevention.

van der Waerden JE, Hoefnagels C, Jansen MW, Hosman CM - BMC Public Health (2010)

Bottom Line: Recruitment, willingness to participate, and retention in interventions are indispensable for successful prevention.The most successful referral strategy was the use of patient databases from GPs working in disadvantaged neighborhoods.Older age and more severe complaints were particularly associated with greater willingness to participate and with retention.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Health Promotion, Maastricht University, Maastricht, the Netherlands. j.vanderwaerden@maastrichtuniversity.nl

ABSTRACT

Background: Recruitment, willingness to participate, and retention in interventions are indispensable for successful prevention. This study investigated the effectiveness of different strategies for recruiting and retaining low-SES women in depression prevention, and explored which sociodemographic characteristics and risk status factors within this specific target group are associated with successful recruitment and retention.

Methods: The process of recruitment, willingness to participate, and retention was structurally mapped and explored. Differences between women who dropped out and those who adhered to the subsequent stages of the recruitment and retention process were investigated. The potential of several referral strategies was also studied, with specific attention paid to the use of GP databases.

Results: As part of the recruitment process, 12.1% of the target population completed a telephone screening. The most successful referral strategy was the use of patient databases from GPs working in disadvantaged neighborhoods. Older age and more severe complaints were particularly associated with greater willingness to participate and with retention.

Conclusions: Low-SES women can be recruited and retained in public health interventions through tailored strategies. The integration of mental health screening within primary care might help to embed preventive interventions in low-SES communities.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Reach of intended target population (N = 2295) per recruitment phase.
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Figure 2: Reach of intended target population (N = 2295) per recruitment phase.

Mentions: The data reported above concern the total recruited sample originating from all neighborhoods. To determine our overall success rate in reaching our target population, we compared a subsample of women living in nine disadvantaged neighborhoods to the theoretical maximum of 2295 low-SES women with depressive complaints living in these neighborhoods. From this selected population we were able to contact 277 women (12.1%) for the screening interview. As table 2 shows, 189 women were eligible for participation in the course. Of the 121 women who consented to an intake, 90 (74.4%) completed the intake and 84 were willing to participate in the course. This means that 3.7% of the 2295 women were reached and that 2.7% attended the course (figure 2).


Exploring recruitment, willingness to participate, and retention of low-SES women in stress and depression prevention.

van der Waerden JE, Hoefnagels C, Jansen MW, Hosman CM - BMC Public Health (2010)

Reach of intended target population (N = 2295) per recruitment phase.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2965718&req=5

Figure 2: Reach of intended target population (N = 2295) per recruitment phase.
Mentions: The data reported above concern the total recruited sample originating from all neighborhoods. To determine our overall success rate in reaching our target population, we compared a subsample of women living in nine disadvantaged neighborhoods to the theoretical maximum of 2295 low-SES women with depressive complaints living in these neighborhoods. From this selected population we were able to contact 277 women (12.1%) for the screening interview. As table 2 shows, 189 women were eligible for participation in the course. Of the 121 women who consented to an intake, 90 (74.4%) completed the intake and 84 were willing to participate in the course. This means that 3.7% of the 2295 women were reached and that 2.7% attended the course (figure 2).

Bottom Line: Recruitment, willingness to participate, and retention in interventions are indispensable for successful prevention.The most successful referral strategy was the use of patient databases from GPs working in disadvantaged neighborhoods.Older age and more severe complaints were particularly associated with greater willingness to participate and with retention.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Health Promotion, Maastricht University, Maastricht, the Netherlands. j.vanderwaerden@maastrichtuniversity.nl

ABSTRACT

Background: Recruitment, willingness to participate, and retention in interventions are indispensable for successful prevention. This study investigated the effectiveness of different strategies for recruiting and retaining low-SES women in depression prevention, and explored which sociodemographic characteristics and risk status factors within this specific target group are associated with successful recruitment and retention.

Methods: The process of recruitment, willingness to participate, and retention was structurally mapped and explored. Differences between women who dropped out and those who adhered to the subsequent stages of the recruitment and retention process were investigated. The potential of several referral strategies was also studied, with specific attention paid to the use of GP databases.

Results: As part of the recruitment process, 12.1% of the target population completed a telephone screening. The most successful referral strategy was the use of patient databases from GPs working in disadvantaged neighborhoods. Older age and more severe complaints were particularly associated with greater willingness to participate and with retention.

Conclusions: Low-SES women can be recruited and retained in public health interventions through tailored strategies. The integration of mental health screening within primary care might help to embed preventive interventions in low-SES communities.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus