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Temporal consistency is currency in shifts of transient visual attention.

Kristjánsson A, Eyjólfsdóttir KÓ, Jónsdóttir A, Arnkelsson G - PLoS ONE (2010)

Bottom Line: We investigated whether such attentional benefits also apply to temporal consistencies.Further experiments show that this form of learning is not under voluntary control.The results add to a growing literature showing how consistency in visual presentation improves visual performance, in this case temporal consistency.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, University of Iceland, Reykjavík, Iceland. ak@hi.is

ABSTRACT

Background: Observers respond more accurately to targets in visual search tasks that share properties with previously presented items, and transient attention can learn featural consistencies on a precue, irrespective of its absolute location.

Methodology/principal findings: We investigated whether such attentional benefits also apply to temporal consistencies. Would performance on a precued Vernier acuity discrimination task, followed by a mask, improve if the cue-lead times (CLTs; 50, 100, 150 or 200 ms) remained constant between trials compared to when they changed? The results showed that if CLTs remained constant for a few trials in a row, Vernier acuity performance gradually improved while changes in CLT from one trial to the next led to worse than average discrimination performance. The results show that transient attention can quickly adjust to temporal regularities, similarly to spatial and featural regularities. Further experiments show that this form of learning is not under voluntary control.

Conclusions/significance: The results add to a growing literature showing how consistency in visual presentation improves visual performance, in this case temporal consistency.

Show MeSH
The sequence of events on a single experimental trial in experiment 1.A fixation point was presented for 1200 to 1700 ms (determined randomly for each trial) followed by the cue presented for 50, 100, 150 or 200 ms (see methods section for details upon the probability of a given CLT). Following the presentation of the cue, the Vernier acuity stimuli were presented for 70 ms followed by the local random dot masks, which were present on the screen until response.
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pone-0013660-g001: The sequence of events on a single experimental trial in experiment 1.A fixation point was presented for 1200 to 1700 ms (determined randomly for each trial) followed by the cue presented for 50, 100, 150 or 200 ms (see methods section for details upon the probability of a given CLT). Following the presentation of the cue, the Vernier acuity stimuli were presented for 70 ms followed by the local random dot masks, which were present on the screen until response.

Mentions: A central white (46.5 cdm−2) fixation cross was present throughout, and observers were instructed to maintain fixation on it during the whole experiment (see figure 1). The observers performed a Vernier acuity discrimination task, judging whether the upper line of a pair was shifted to the left or right relative to the lower one (among distractor Vernier acuity stimuli). The upper line of the pair of lines was displaced to the left or right by 6, 12, 18, 30 or 42 arc min. The vertical distance between the two was 0). The Vernier acuity stimuli were presented in white (same brightness as the fixation cross), the length of each line of a pair was 1.3 arc deg and the line thickness was 36 arc min. The local random-dot masks were 2.5° by 2.5° (dot size  = 12 arc min) and the dots were either black (5.67 cdm−2), or white. The cue was a black circle (line thickness 36 arc min) surrounding the location of the target. The radius of the cue was 1.7 arc deg. The stimuli were presented on a mid-grey background (21.7 cdm−2). The distance of the Vernier acuity stimuli from the fixation point was 13 arc deg.


Temporal consistency is currency in shifts of transient visual attention.

Kristjánsson A, Eyjólfsdóttir KÓ, Jónsdóttir A, Arnkelsson G - PLoS ONE (2010)

The sequence of events on a single experimental trial in experiment 1.A fixation point was presented for 1200 to 1700 ms (determined randomly for each trial) followed by the cue presented for 50, 100, 150 or 200 ms (see methods section for details upon the probability of a given CLT). Following the presentation of the cue, the Vernier acuity stimuli were presented for 70 ms followed by the local random dot masks, which were present on the screen until response.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2965655&req=5

pone-0013660-g001: The sequence of events on a single experimental trial in experiment 1.A fixation point was presented for 1200 to 1700 ms (determined randomly for each trial) followed by the cue presented for 50, 100, 150 or 200 ms (see methods section for details upon the probability of a given CLT). Following the presentation of the cue, the Vernier acuity stimuli were presented for 70 ms followed by the local random dot masks, which were present on the screen until response.
Mentions: A central white (46.5 cdm−2) fixation cross was present throughout, and observers were instructed to maintain fixation on it during the whole experiment (see figure 1). The observers performed a Vernier acuity discrimination task, judging whether the upper line of a pair was shifted to the left or right relative to the lower one (among distractor Vernier acuity stimuli). The upper line of the pair of lines was displaced to the left or right by 6, 12, 18, 30 or 42 arc min. The vertical distance between the two was 0). The Vernier acuity stimuli were presented in white (same brightness as the fixation cross), the length of each line of a pair was 1.3 arc deg and the line thickness was 36 arc min. The local random-dot masks were 2.5° by 2.5° (dot size  = 12 arc min) and the dots were either black (5.67 cdm−2), or white. The cue was a black circle (line thickness 36 arc min) surrounding the location of the target. The radius of the cue was 1.7 arc deg. The stimuli were presented on a mid-grey background (21.7 cdm−2). The distance of the Vernier acuity stimuli from the fixation point was 13 arc deg.

Bottom Line: We investigated whether such attentional benefits also apply to temporal consistencies.Further experiments show that this form of learning is not under voluntary control.The results add to a growing literature showing how consistency in visual presentation improves visual performance, in this case temporal consistency.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychology, University of Iceland, Reykjavík, Iceland. ak@hi.is

ABSTRACT

Background: Observers respond more accurately to targets in visual search tasks that share properties with previously presented items, and transient attention can learn featural consistencies on a precue, irrespective of its absolute location.

Methodology/principal findings: We investigated whether such attentional benefits also apply to temporal consistencies. Would performance on a precued Vernier acuity discrimination task, followed by a mask, improve if the cue-lead times (CLTs; 50, 100, 150 or 200 ms) remained constant between trials compared to when they changed? The results showed that if CLTs remained constant for a few trials in a row, Vernier acuity performance gradually improved while changes in CLT from one trial to the next led to worse than average discrimination performance. The results show that transient attention can quickly adjust to temporal regularities, similarly to spatial and featural regularities. Further experiments show that this form of learning is not under voluntary control.

Conclusions/significance: The results add to a growing literature showing how consistency in visual presentation improves visual performance, in this case temporal consistency.

Show MeSH