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Chlorophyll Catabolites - Chemical and Structural Footprints of a Fascinating Biological Phenomenon.

Moser S, Müller T, Oberhuber M, Kräutler B - European J Org Chem (2008)

Bottom Line: It involves colored intermediates only fleetingly and in an (elusive) enzyme-bound form.However, they are effective antioxidants, and may thus also have physiologically beneficial chemical properties.(© Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co.KGaA, 69451 Weinheim, Germany, 2009).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Organic Chemistry and Centre of Molecular Biosciences, University of Innsbruck Innrain 52a, 6020 Innsbruck, Austria, E-mail: bernhard.kraeutler@uibk.ac.at.

ABSTRACT
Twenty years ago, the molecular basis for the seasonal disappearance of chlorophyll was still enigmatic. In the meantime, our knowledge on chlorophyll breakdown has grown considerably. As outlined here, it has been possible to decipher the basic transformations involved in natural chlorophyll breakdown by identification of chlorophyll catabolites in higher plants, and with the help of the synthesis of (putative) catabolic intermediates. In vascular plants, chlorophyll breakdown typically converts the green plant pigments efficiently into colorless and non-fluorescent tetrapyrroles. It involves colored intermediates only fleetingly and in an (elusive) enzyme-bound form. The non-fluorescent chlorophyll catabolites accumulate in the vacuoles of degreened leaves and are considered the products, primarily, of a detoxification process. However, they are effective antioxidants, and may thus also have physiologically beneficial chemical properties.(© Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, 69451 Weinheim, Germany, 2009).

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Yellow bananas are blue luminescent. Yellow ripe and green unripe bananas pictured (top) under white light or (middle) UV light at 366 nm and (bottom) luminescence spectra of intact ripened bananas, when greenish (green line), bright yellow (red line) and brown-yellow (black line), and of Mc-FCC (in methanol, dashed red line), with excitation at 350 nm.48
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fig05: Yellow bananas are blue luminescent. Yellow ripe and green unripe bananas pictured (top) under white light or (middle) UV light at 366 nm and (bottom) luminescence spectra of intact ripened bananas, when greenish (green line), bright yellow (red line) and brown-yellow (black line), and of Mc-FCC (in methanol, dashed red line), with excitation at 350 nm.48

Mentions: Surprisingly, in yellow banana peel (Musa cavendish) the most abundant chlorophyll catabolites turned out to be polar fluorescent chlorophyll catabolites (FCCs), which accumulated during the ripening process in the peels (see Figure 5).48 As described above, FCCs are only fleetingly observed products of chlorophyll breakdown and are believed usually to isomerize to nonfluorescent chlorophyll catabolites in a rapid nonenzymatic process in the acidic vacuoles. Apparently, the situation in the banana is different: in extracts of yellow banana peels, polar FCCs are abundant and occur in great variety. They are easily detectable as some of the most abundant and intensive peaks in an HPLC analysis.


Chlorophyll Catabolites - Chemical and Structural Footprints of a Fascinating Biological Phenomenon.

Moser S, Müller T, Oberhuber M, Kräutler B - European J Org Chem (2008)

Yellow bananas are blue luminescent. Yellow ripe and green unripe bananas pictured (top) under white light or (middle) UV light at 366 nm and (bottom) luminescence spectra of intact ripened bananas, when greenish (green line), bright yellow (red line) and brown-yellow (black line), and of Mc-FCC (in methanol, dashed red line), with excitation at 350 nm.48
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2965369&req=5

fig05: Yellow bananas are blue luminescent. Yellow ripe and green unripe bananas pictured (top) under white light or (middle) UV light at 366 nm and (bottom) luminescence spectra of intact ripened bananas, when greenish (green line), bright yellow (red line) and brown-yellow (black line), and of Mc-FCC (in methanol, dashed red line), with excitation at 350 nm.48
Mentions: Surprisingly, in yellow banana peel (Musa cavendish) the most abundant chlorophyll catabolites turned out to be polar fluorescent chlorophyll catabolites (FCCs), which accumulated during the ripening process in the peels (see Figure 5).48 As described above, FCCs are only fleetingly observed products of chlorophyll breakdown and are believed usually to isomerize to nonfluorescent chlorophyll catabolites in a rapid nonenzymatic process in the acidic vacuoles. Apparently, the situation in the banana is different: in extracts of yellow banana peels, polar FCCs are abundant and occur in great variety. They are easily detectable as some of the most abundant and intensive peaks in an HPLC analysis.

Bottom Line: It involves colored intermediates only fleetingly and in an (elusive) enzyme-bound form.However, they are effective antioxidants, and may thus also have physiologically beneficial chemical properties.(© Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co.KGaA, 69451 Weinheim, Germany, 2009).

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institute of Organic Chemistry and Centre of Molecular Biosciences, University of Innsbruck Innrain 52a, 6020 Innsbruck, Austria, E-mail: bernhard.kraeutler@uibk.ac.at.

ABSTRACT
Twenty years ago, the molecular basis for the seasonal disappearance of chlorophyll was still enigmatic. In the meantime, our knowledge on chlorophyll breakdown has grown considerably. As outlined here, it has been possible to decipher the basic transformations involved in natural chlorophyll breakdown by identification of chlorophyll catabolites in higher plants, and with the help of the synthesis of (putative) catabolic intermediates. In vascular plants, chlorophyll breakdown typically converts the green plant pigments efficiently into colorless and non-fluorescent tetrapyrroles. It involves colored intermediates only fleetingly and in an (elusive) enzyme-bound form. The non-fluorescent chlorophyll catabolites accumulate in the vacuoles of degreened leaves and are considered the products, primarily, of a detoxification process. However, they are effective antioxidants, and may thus also have physiologically beneficial chemical properties.(© Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, 69451 Weinheim, Germany, 2009).

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus