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Causes for hospitalizations at upazila health complexes in Bangladesh.

Ahmed S, Siddique AK, Iqbal A, Rahman FK, Islam MN, Sobhan MA, Islam MR, Sack RB - J Health Popul Nutr (2010)

Bottom Line: During this period, 75,598 hospital admissions in total were recorded, of which 54% were for male, and 46% were for female.A considerable proportion (8.3%) of the hospitalized patients remained undiagnosed.Despite the limitations of hospital-based data, this paper gives a reasonable insight of the important causes for hospitalizations in upazila health complexes that may guide the policy-makers in strengthening and prioritizing the healthcare needs at the upazila level in Bangladesh.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Public Health Sciences Division, ICDDR,B, GPO Box 128, Dhaka 1000, Bangladesh. suahmed@icddrb.org

ABSTRACT
Morbidity and mortality data are important for planning and implementing healthcare strategies of a country. To understand the major causes for hospitalizations in rural Bangladesh, demographic and clinical data were collected from the hospital-records of five government-run rural health facilities (upazila health complexes) situated at different geographical regions of the country from January 1997 to December 2001. During this period, 75,598 hospital admissions in total were recorded, of which 54% were for male, and 46% were for female. Of all the admissions, diarrhoeal disease was the leading cause for hospitalization (25.1%), followed by injuries (17.7%), respiratory tract diseases (12.6%), diseases of the gastrointestinal tract (10.5%), obstetric and gynaecological causes (8.5%), and febrile illnesses (6.7%). A considerable proportion (8.3%) of the hospitalized patients remained undiagnosed. Despite the limitations of hospital-based data, this paper gives a reasonable insight of the important causes for hospitalizations in upazila health complexes that may guide the policy-makers in strengthening and prioritizing the healthcare needs at the upazila level in Bangladesh.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Locations of upazila health complexes
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Figure 1: Locations of upazila health complexes

Mentions: During January 1997–December 2001, while conducting cholera surveillance at five UHCs, surveillance physicians from the Epidemic Control Preparedness Unit of ICDDR,B (International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh) collected data from hospital-registers on all hospitalized patients. The different locations of the upazilas (subdistricts) are shown in Figure 1. Data collected included demographic information and clinical diagnosis made by the attending physician. Data collected were later entered into a microcomputer and validated by double entry and logical checks. The compiled data of categorized causes for hospitalizations presented in this study are essentially similar to those of the disease-reporting system available at the UHC. We followed the age-group classifications that were in use at the UHCs for reporting different illnesses to the district level during the above time period. The differences in the proportion of different causes for hospitalizations between two groups were done by the chi-square test.


Causes for hospitalizations at upazila health complexes in Bangladesh.

Ahmed S, Siddique AK, Iqbal A, Rahman FK, Islam MN, Sobhan MA, Islam MR, Sack RB - J Health Popul Nutr (2010)

Locations of upazila health complexes
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2965332&req=5

Figure 1: Locations of upazila health complexes
Mentions: During January 1997–December 2001, while conducting cholera surveillance at five UHCs, surveillance physicians from the Epidemic Control Preparedness Unit of ICDDR,B (International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh) collected data from hospital-registers on all hospitalized patients. The different locations of the upazilas (subdistricts) are shown in Figure 1. Data collected included demographic information and clinical diagnosis made by the attending physician. Data collected were later entered into a microcomputer and validated by double entry and logical checks. The compiled data of categorized causes for hospitalizations presented in this study are essentially similar to those of the disease-reporting system available at the UHC. We followed the age-group classifications that were in use at the UHCs for reporting different illnesses to the district level during the above time period. The differences in the proportion of different causes for hospitalizations between two groups were done by the chi-square test.

Bottom Line: During this period, 75,598 hospital admissions in total were recorded, of which 54% were for male, and 46% were for female.A considerable proportion (8.3%) of the hospitalized patients remained undiagnosed.Despite the limitations of hospital-based data, this paper gives a reasonable insight of the important causes for hospitalizations in upazila health complexes that may guide the policy-makers in strengthening and prioritizing the healthcare needs at the upazila level in Bangladesh.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Public Health Sciences Division, ICDDR,B, GPO Box 128, Dhaka 1000, Bangladesh. suahmed@icddrb.org

ABSTRACT
Morbidity and mortality data are important for planning and implementing healthcare strategies of a country. To understand the major causes for hospitalizations in rural Bangladesh, demographic and clinical data were collected from the hospital-records of five government-run rural health facilities (upazila health complexes) situated at different geographical regions of the country from January 1997 to December 2001. During this period, 75,598 hospital admissions in total were recorded, of which 54% were for male, and 46% were for female. Of all the admissions, diarrhoeal disease was the leading cause for hospitalization (25.1%), followed by injuries (17.7%), respiratory tract diseases (12.6%), diseases of the gastrointestinal tract (10.5%), obstetric and gynaecological causes (8.5%), and febrile illnesses (6.7%). A considerable proportion (8.3%) of the hospitalized patients remained undiagnosed. Despite the limitations of hospital-based data, this paper gives a reasonable insight of the important causes for hospitalizations in upazila health complexes that may guide the policy-makers in strengthening and prioritizing the healthcare needs at the upazila level in Bangladesh.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus