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High-Temperature Stable Operation of Nanoribbon Field-Effect Transistors.

Choi CY, Lee JH, Koh JH, Ha JG, Koo SM, Kim S - Nanoscale Res Lett (2010)

Bottom Line: We experimentally demonstrated that nanoribbon field-effect transistors can be used for stable high-temperature applications.The on-current level of the nanoribbon FETs decreases at elevated temperatures due to the degradation of the electron mobility.These two methods were compared by two-dimensional numerical simulations.

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ABSTRACT
We experimentally demonstrated that nanoribbon field-effect transistors can be used for stable high-temperature applications. The on-current level of the nanoribbon FETs decreases at elevated temperatures due to the degradation of the electron mobility. We propose two methods of compensating for the variation of the current level with the temperature in the range of 25-150°C, involving the application of a suitable (1) positive or (2) negative substrate bias. These two methods were compared by two-dimensional numerical simulations. Although both approaches show constant on-state current saturation characteristics over the proposed temperature range, the latter shows an improvement in the off-state control of up to five orders of magnitude (-5.2 × 10(-6)).

No MeSH data available.


a Compensated IDS—VDS curves with positive substrate bias (VSUB) of the device. The inset shows the substrate bias (VSUB) applied for the purpose of keeping the operation of the device constant for temperatures from 25 to 150°C. (The dashed lines show the corresponding results obtained from the 2D numerical simulations.) b and c show the channel cross-sections of the simulated device, indicating the conduction current density contours for the compensated b’on state’ and c’off state’ with VSUB = 15.1 V at T = 150°C
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Figure 4: a Compensated IDS—VDS curves with positive substrate bias (VSUB) of the device. The inset shows the substrate bias (VSUB) applied for the purpose of keeping the operation of the device constant for temperatures from 25 to 150°C. (The dashed lines show the corresponding results obtained from the 2D numerical simulations.) b and c show the channel cross-sections of the simulated device, indicating the conduction current density contours for the compensated b’on state’ and c’off state’ with VSUB = 15.1 V at T = 150°C

Mentions: Figure 4a shows the compensated IDS—VDS curves derived from the measurements (solid lines) and simulations (dashed lines) with a positive substrate bias VSUB, according to ‘method (1)’. The inset shows the VSUB values applied for the purpose of keeping the operation of the device constant for temperatures in the range from 25 to 150°C. An approximately constant level on-state was maintained in spite of the temperature variation. However, the maximum leakage current in the off state is as much as ~9% of the on-state current level. This is due to the additional inversion currents on the bottom of the channel surface formed by the positive substrate bias, VSUB. As can be seen in Fig. 4c, an increase in the current density, J, is clearly observed on the bottom of the channel surface.


High-Temperature Stable Operation of Nanoribbon Field-Effect Transistors.

Choi CY, Lee JH, Koh JH, Ha JG, Koo SM, Kim S - Nanoscale Res Lett (2010)

a Compensated IDS—VDS curves with positive substrate bias (VSUB) of the device. The inset shows the substrate bias (VSUB) applied for the purpose of keeping the operation of the device constant for temperatures from 25 to 150°C. (The dashed lines show the corresponding results obtained from the 2D numerical simulations.) b and c show the channel cross-sections of the simulated device, indicating the conduction current density contours for the compensated b’on state’ and c’off state’ with VSUB = 15.1 V at T = 150°C
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2964476&req=5

Figure 4: a Compensated IDS—VDS curves with positive substrate bias (VSUB) of the device. The inset shows the substrate bias (VSUB) applied for the purpose of keeping the operation of the device constant for temperatures from 25 to 150°C. (The dashed lines show the corresponding results obtained from the 2D numerical simulations.) b and c show the channel cross-sections of the simulated device, indicating the conduction current density contours for the compensated b’on state’ and c’off state’ with VSUB = 15.1 V at T = 150°C
Mentions: Figure 4a shows the compensated IDS—VDS curves derived from the measurements (solid lines) and simulations (dashed lines) with a positive substrate bias VSUB, according to ‘method (1)’. The inset shows the VSUB values applied for the purpose of keeping the operation of the device constant for temperatures in the range from 25 to 150°C. An approximately constant level on-state was maintained in spite of the temperature variation. However, the maximum leakage current in the off state is as much as ~9% of the on-state current level. This is due to the additional inversion currents on the bottom of the channel surface formed by the positive substrate bias, VSUB. As can be seen in Fig. 4c, an increase in the current density, J, is clearly observed on the bottom of the channel surface.

Bottom Line: We experimentally demonstrated that nanoribbon field-effect transistors can be used for stable high-temperature applications.The on-current level of the nanoribbon FETs decreases at elevated temperatures due to the degradation of the electron mobility.These two methods were compared by two-dimensional numerical simulations.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

ABSTRACT
We experimentally demonstrated that nanoribbon field-effect transistors can be used for stable high-temperature applications. The on-current level of the nanoribbon FETs decreases at elevated temperatures due to the degradation of the electron mobility. We propose two methods of compensating for the variation of the current level with the temperature in the range of 25-150°C, involving the application of a suitable (1) positive or (2) negative substrate bias. These two methods were compared by two-dimensional numerical simulations. Although both approaches show constant on-state current saturation characteristics over the proposed temperature range, the latter shows an improvement in the off-state control of up to five orders of magnitude (-5.2 × 10(-6)).

No MeSH data available.