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Low-energy nanoemulsification to design veterinary controlled drug delivery devices.

Vandamme TF, Anton N - Int J Nanomedicine (2010)

Bottom Line: The unique properties of nanomaterials related to structural stability and quantum-scale reactive properties open up a world of possibilities that could be exploited to design and to target drug delivery or create truly microscale biological sensors for veterinary applications.We developed cost-saving and solvent-free nanoemulsions.Formulated with a low-energy method, these nanoemulsions can find application in the delivery of controlled amounts of drugs into the beverage of breeding animals (such as poultry, cattle, pigs) or be used for the controlled release of injectable poorly water-soluble drugs.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Strasbourg, Faculty of Pharmacy, Illkirch Cedex, France. vandamme@unistra.fr

ABSTRACT
The unique properties of nanomaterials related to structural stability and quantum-scale reactive properties open up a world of possibilities that could be exploited to design and to target drug delivery or create truly microscale biological sensors for veterinary applications. We developed cost-saving and solvent-free nanoemulsions. Formulated with a low-energy method, these nanoemulsions can find application in the delivery of controlled amounts of drugs into the beverage of breeding animals (such as poultry, cattle, pigs) or be used for the controlled release of injectable poorly water-soluble drugs.

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Encapsulation of sulfamethazine in nanoemulsions formulated with low-energy spontaneous emulsification, with ethanol as a cosolvent. Hydrodynamic diameter and polydispersity index (PDI; inset) are plotted against the surfactant/oil weight ratio (SOR). Surfactant = C remophor ELP®, oil = Labrafil M 1944 CS®. Oil/cosolvent weight ratio = 1. The gray part indicates that the criteria of PDI quality are not met, and the suspension cannot be considered as a nanoemulsion.
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f4-ijn-5-867: Encapsulation of sulfamethazine in nanoemulsions formulated with low-energy spontaneous emulsification, with ethanol as a cosolvent. Hydrodynamic diameter and polydispersity index (PDI; inset) are plotted against the surfactant/oil weight ratio (SOR). Surfactant = C remophor ELP®, oil = Labrafil M 1944 CS®. Oil/cosolvent weight ratio = 1. The gray part indicates that the criteria of PDI quality are not met, and the suspension cannot be considered as a nanoemulsion.

Mentions: The second example of drug nanoencapsulation uses sulfamethazine, which is a veterinary antibacterial drug used in breeding animals. This molecule was selected to illustrate the experimental case for which drug solubilization is not simply achieved in the pure oily phase but needs the help of an additional cosolvent. Therefore, two cosolvents were tested: one is ethanol used with the combination Labrafil M 1944 CS®/Cremophor ELP® (Figure 4); the other is tetraglycol, a solvent also compatible with parenteral administration (described in the Meterials and Methods section), used with two examples of oil–surfactants combinations: Labrafac CC®/Cremophor ELP® (Figure 5A), and vitamin E acetate/Cremophor ELP® (Figure 5B).


Low-energy nanoemulsification to design veterinary controlled drug delivery devices.

Vandamme TF, Anton N - Int J Nanomedicine (2010)

Encapsulation of sulfamethazine in nanoemulsions formulated with low-energy spontaneous emulsification, with ethanol as a cosolvent. Hydrodynamic diameter and polydispersity index (PDI; inset) are plotted against the surfactant/oil weight ratio (SOR). Surfactant = C remophor ELP®, oil = Labrafil M 1944 CS®. Oil/cosolvent weight ratio = 1. The gray part indicates that the criteria of PDI quality are not met, and the suspension cannot be considered as a nanoemulsion.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2963933&req=5

f4-ijn-5-867: Encapsulation of sulfamethazine in nanoemulsions formulated with low-energy spontaneous emulsification, with ethanol as a cosolvent. Hydrodynamic diameter and polydispersity index (PDI; inset) are plotted against the surfactant/oil weight ratio (SOR). Surfactant = C remophor ELP®, oil = Labrafil M 1944 CS®. Oil/cosolvent weight ratio = 1. The gray part indicates that the criteria of PDI quality are not met, and the suspension cannot be considered as a nanoemulsion.
Mentions: The second example of drug nanoencapsulation uses sulfamethazine, which is a veterinary antibacterial drug used in breeding animals. This molecule was selected to illustrate the experimental case for which drug solubilization is not simply achieved in the pure oily phase but needs the help of an additional cosolvent. Therefore, two cosolvents were tested: one is ethanol used with the combination Labrafil M 1944 CS®/Cremophor ELP® (Figure 4); the other is tetraglycol, a solvent also compatible with parenteral administration (described in the Meterials and Methods section), used with two examples of oil–surfactants combinations: Labrafac CC®/Cremophor ELP® (Figure 5A), and vitamin E acetate/Cremophor ELP® (Figure 5B).

Bottom Line: The unique properties of nanomaterials related to structural stability and quantum-scale reactive properties open up a world of possibilities that could be exploited to design and to target drug delivery or create truly microscale biological sensors for veterinary applications.We developed cost-saving and solvent-free nanoemulsions.Formulated with a low-energy method, these nanoemulsions can find application in the delivery of controlled amounts of drugs into the beverage of breeding animals (such as poultry, cattle, pigs) or be used for the controlled release of injectable poorly water-soluble drugs.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: University of Strasbourg, Faculty of Pharmacy, Illkirch Cedex, France. vandamme@unistra.fr

ABSTRACT
The unique properties of nanomaterials related to structural stability and quantum-scale reactive properties open up a world of possibilities that could be exploited to design and to target drug delivery or create truly microscale biological sensors for veterinary applications. We developed cost-saving and solvent-free nanoemulsions. Formulated with a low-energy method, these nanoemulsions can find application in the delivery of controlled amounts of drugs into the beverage of breeding animals (such as poultry, cattle, pigs) or be used for the controlled release of injectable poorly water-soluble drugs.

Show MeSH