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Types of neural guides and using nanotechnology for peripheral nerve reconstruction.

Biazar E, Khorasani MT, Montazeri N, Pourshamsian K, Daliri M, Rezaei M, Jabarvand M, Khoshzaban A, Heidari S, Jafarpour M, Roviemiab Z - Int J Nanomedicine (2010)

Bottom Line: Utilization of absorbable and nonabsorbable synthetic and natural polymers with unique characteristics can be an appropriate solution to repair damaged nerve tissues.Better cell adhesion and migration, more guiding of axons, and structural features, such as porosity, provide a clearer role for nanofibers in the restoration of neural tissues.In this paper, basic concepts of peripheral nerve injury, types of artificial and natural guides, and methods to improve the performance of tubes, such as orientation, nanotechnology applications for nerve reconstruction, fibers and nanofibers, electrospinning methods, and their application in peripheral nerve reconstruction are reviewed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Chemistry, Islamic Azad University-Tonekabon Branch, Iran. e.biazar@tonekaboniau.ac.ir

ABSTRACT
Peripheral nerve injuries can lead to lifetime loss of function and permanent disfigurement. Different methods, such as conventional allograft procedures and use of biologic tubes present problems when used for damaged peripheral nerve reconstruction. Designed scaffolds comprised of natural and synthetic materials are now widely used in the reconstruction of damaged tissues. Utilization of absorbable and nonabsorbable synthetic and natural polymers with unique characteristics can be an appropriate solution to repair damaged nerve tissues. Polymeric nanofibrous scaffolds with properties similar to neural structures can be more effective in the reconstruction process. Better cell adhesion and migration, more guiding of axons, and structural features, such as porosity, provide a clearer role for nanofibers in the restoration of neural tissues. In this paper, basic concepts of peripheral nerve injury, types of artificial and natural guides, and methods to improve the performance of tubes, such as orientation, nanotechnology applications for nerve reconstruction, fibers and nanofibers, electrospinning methods, and their application in peripheral nerve reconstruction are reviewed.

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Electron micrograph of a poly glycolic acid (PGA)-collagen composite nerve conduit filled with collagen sponge. The PGA-collagen composite conduit is filled with a three-dimensional sponge matrix.
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f6-ijn-5-839: Electron micrograph of a poly glycolic acid (PGA)-collagen composite nerve conduit filled with collagen sponge. The PGA-collagen composite conduit is filled with a three-dimensional sponge matrix.

Mentions: The best materials for designing a scaffold are possibly both synthetic and natural polymers. Natural polymers, such as chitosan, alginate, and especially collagen and fibrin, due to their structural similarity with the neural structure, and properties such as cell attachment have better advantages than synthetic polymers, but design considerations and their propensity to swell is problematic in the widespread use of such materials. However, designs with small nerve gaps have been responsive. Utilizing synthetic polymers because of the design control and the use of natural polymers, either spongy or fibrous, and oriented porous or hydrogel and other forms and/or coated, can show better function for neural reconstruction. Japanese researchers using polymeric PGA mesh and collagen sponge inside the tube could reconstruct a peripheral nerve gap of about 3 cm.32,33 This structure is shown in Figure 6.33


Types of neural guides and using nanotechnology for peripheral nerve reconstruction.

Biazar E, Khorasani MT, Montazeri N, Pourshamsian K, Daliri M, Rezaei M, Jabarvand M, Khoshzaban A, Heidari S, Jafarpour M, Roviemiab Z - Int J Nanomedicine (2010)

Electron micrograph of a poly glycolic acid (PGA)-collagen composite nerve conduit filled with collagen sponge. The PGA-collagen composite conduit is filled with a three-dimensional sponge matrix.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2963930&req=5

f6-ijn-5-839: Electron micrograph of a poly glycolic acid (PGA)-collagen composite nerve conduit filled with collagen sponge. The PGA-collagen composite conduit is filled with a three-dimensional sponge matrix.
Mentions: The best materials for designing a scaffold are possibly both synthetic and natural polymers. Natural polymers, such as chitosan, alginate, and especially collagen and fibrin, due to their structural similarity with the neural structure, and properties such as cell attachment have better advantages than synthetic polymers, but design considerations and their propensity to swell is problematic in the widespread use of such materials. However, designs with small nerve gaps have been responsive. Utilizing synthetic polymers because of the design control and the use of natural polymers, either spongy or fibrous, and oriented porous or hydrogel and other forms and/or coated, can show better function for neural reconstruction. Japanese researchers using polymeric PGA mesh and collagen sponge inside the tube could reconstruct a peripheral nerve gap of about 3 cm.32,33 This structure is shown in Figure 6.33

Bottom Line: Utilization of absorbable and nonabsorbable synthetic and natural polymers with unique characteristics can be an appropriate solution to repair damaged nerve tissues.Better cell adhesion and migration, more guiding of axons, and structural features, such as porosity, provide a clearer role for nanofibers in the restoration of neural tissues.In this paper, basic concepts of peripheral nerve injury, types of artificial and natural guides, and methods to improve the performance of tubes, such as orientation, nanotechnology applications for nerve reconstruction, fibers and nanofibers, electrospinning methods, and their application in peripheral nerve reconstruction are reviewed.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Chemistry, Islamic Azad University-Tonekabon Branch, Iran. e.biazar@tonekaboniau.ac.ir

ABSTRACT
Peripheral nerve injuries can lead to lifetime loss of function and permanent disfigurement. Different methods, such as conventional allograft procedures and use of biologic tubes present problems when used for damaged peripheral nerve reconstruction. Designed scaffolds comprised of natural and synthetic materials are now widely used in the reconstruction of damaged tissues. Utilization of absorbable and nonabsorbable synthetic and natural polymers with unique characteristics can be an appropriate solution to repair damaged nerve tissues. Polymeric nanofibrous scaffolds with properties similar to neural structures can be more effective in the reconstruction process. Better cell adhesion and migration, more guiding of axons, and structural features, such as porosity, provide a clearer role for nanofibers in the restoration of neural tissues. In this paper, basic concepts of peripheral nerve injury, types of artificial and natural guides, and methods to improve the performance of tubes, such as orientation, nanotechnology applications for nerve reconstruction, fibers and nanofibers, electrospinning methods, and their application in peripheral nerve reconstruction are reviewed.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus