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Mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition of intercalating cells in Drosophila renal tubules depends on polarity cues from epithelial neighbours.

Campbell K, Casanova J, Skaer H - Mech. Dev. (2010)

Bottom Line: We also show that expression of basolateral proteins in stellate cells is a prerequisite for their ingression between principal cells.We present a model in which the contacts with successive principal cell membrane domains made by stellate cells as they integrate between them act as a cue for the elaboration of stellate cell polarity.We suggest that the formation of zonula adherens junctions between new cell neighbours establishes their apico-basal positions and stabilises them in the epithelium.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institut de Biologia Molecular de Barcelona-CSIC, Parc Cientific de Barcelona, 08028 Barcelona, Spain.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Stellate cells integrate into the renal tubules during stage 13–14 and become spaced out as the tubules elongate. Embryos in which a membrane-bound GFP is driven by G447.2 to visualise the stellate cells, stained for GFP (green) and Ct (red). (A) In early stage 13 embryos only a few stellate cells have integrated into the tubules, and these are clustered on the inner face of the tubule kink. (B) By stage 14 the majority of stellate cells have integrated into the tubules but are not evenly distributed along the tubules, being more spaced out at the distal tip and remaining clustered in the kink and proximal region. (C) In stage 15 the stellate cells are spaced out distally, where the tubule has narrowed (arrowhead), but are still clustered more proximally, where the tubule is thicker in circumference (arrow). (D) By stage 16 the stellate cells are spaced out along the tubules. (k) tubule kink, (p) proximal region, (d) distal region, white lines outline the tubules. Scale bars are 10 μm.
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fig1: Stellate cells integrate into the renal tubules during stage 13–14 and become spaced out as the tubules elongate. Embryos in which a membrane-bound GFP is driven by G447.2 to visualise the stellate cells, stained for GFP (green) and Ct (red). (A) In early stage 13 embryos only a few stellate cells have integrated into the tubules, and these are clustered on the inner face of the tubule kink. (B) By stage 14 the majority of stellate cells have integrated into the tubules but are not evenly distributed along the tubules, being more spaced out at the distal tip and remaining clustered in the kink and proximal region. (C) In stage 15 the stellate cells are spaced out distally, where the tubule has narrowed (arrowhead), but are still clustered more proximally, where the tubule is thicker in circumference (arrow). (D) By stage 16 the stellate cells are spaced out along the tubules. (k) tubule kink, (p) proximal region, (d) distal region, white lines outline the tubules. Scale bars are 10 μm.

Mentions: Previous work has shown that the stellate cells integrate into the tubules during stages 13–15 of embryogenesis (Denholm et al., 2003). In order to assess precisely when the integration of the stellate cells takes place, and to understand the behaviour of stellate cells during renal tubulogenesis, we labelled stellate cells with a membrane-bound GFP using G447.2, a Gal4 line that positively marks stellate cells (Denholm et al., 2003). Stellate cells were first detected in the tubules during stage 13, when the renal tubules are curved structures, with the anterior tubules folding back on themselves roughly 2/3 along their length, forming a ‘kink’. It is on the inner face of the kink region that stellate cells are first found during early stage 13 (Fig. 1A). By mid-late stage 14 the process of stellate cell intercalation into the tubules is complete. While those found in the kink region, and just proximal to the kink remain clustered together, stellate cells found more distally in the tubules tend to be separated by principal cells (Fig. 1B). During stages 15 and 16 the proportion of stellate cells separated by principal cells increases, so that they are found increasingly spaced out along the future secretory domain of the tubules (Fig. 1C and D).


Mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition of intercalating cells in Drosophila renal tubules depends on polarity cues from epithelial neighbours.

Campbell K, Casanova J, Skaer H - Mech. Dev. (2010)

Stellate cells integrate into the renal tubules during stage 13–14 and become spaced out as the tubules elongate. Embryos in which a membrane-bound GFP is driven by G447.2 to visualise the stellate cells, stained for GFP (green) and Ct (red). (A) In early stage 13 embryos only a few stellate cells have integrated into the tubules, and these are clustered on the inner face of the tubule kink. (B) By stage 14 the majority of stellate cells have integrated into the tubules but are not evenly distributed along the tubules, being more spaced out at the distal tip and remaining clustered in the kink and proximal region. (C) In stage 15 the stellate cells are spaced out distally, where the tubule has narrowed (arrowhead), but are still clustered more proximally, where the tubule is thicker in circumference (arrow). (D) By stage 16 the stellate cells are spaced out along the tubules. (k) tubule kink, (p) proximal region, (d) distal region, white lines outline the tubules. Scale bars are 10 μm.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

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Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2963794&req=5

fig1: Stellate cells integrate into the renal tubules during stage 13–14 and become spaced out as the tubules elongate. Embryos in which a membrane-bound GFP is driven by G447.2 to visualise the stellate cells, stained for GFP (green) and Ct (red). (A) In early stage 13 embryos only a few stellate cells have integrated into the tubules, and these are clustered on the inner face of the tubule kink. (B) By stage 14 the majority of stellate cells have integrated into the tubules but are not evenly distributed along the tubules, being more spaced out at the distal tip and remaining clustered in the kink and proximal region. (C) In stage 15 the stellate cells are spaced out distally, where the tubule has narrowed (arrowhead), but are still clustered more proximally, where the tubule is thicker in circumference (arrow). (D) By stage 16 the stellate cells are spaced out along the tubules. (k) tubule kink, (p) proximal region, (d) distal region, white lines outline the tubules. Scale bars are 10 μm.
Mentions: Previous work has shown that the stellate cells integrate into the tubules during stages 13–15 of embryogenesis (Denholm et al., 2003). In order to assess precisely when the integration of the stellate cells takes place, and to understand the behaviour of stellate cells during renal tubulogenesis, we labelled stellate cells with a membrane-bound GFP using G447.2, a Gal4 line that positively marks stellate cells (Denholm et al., 2003). Stellate cells were first detected in the tubules during stage 13, when the renal tubules are curved structures, with the anterior tubules folding back on themselves roughly 2/3 along their length, forming a ‘kink’. It is on the inner face of the kink region that stellate cells are first found during early stage 13 (Fig. 1A). By mid-late stage 14 the process of stellate cell intercalation into the tubules is complete. While those found in the kink region, and just proximal to the kink remain clustered together, stellate cells found more distally in the tubules tend to be separated by principal cells (Fig. 1B). During stages 15 and 16 the proportion of stellate cells separated by principal cells increases, so that they are found increasingly spaced out along the future secretory domain of the tubules (Fig. 1C and D).

Bottom Line: We also show that expression of basolateral proteins in stellate cells is a prerequisite for their ingression between principal cells.We present a model in which the contacts with successive principal cell membrane domains made by stellate cells as they integrate between them act as a cue for the elaboration of stellate cell polarity.We suggest that the formation of zonula adherens junctions between new cell neighbours establishes their apico-basal positions and stabilises them in the epithelium.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Institut de Biologia Molecular de Barcelona-CSIC, Parc Cientific de Barcelona, 08028 Barcelona, Spain.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus