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Pictorial Essay: Infants of diabetic mothers.

Alorainy IA, Barlas NB, Al-Boukai AA - Indian J Radiol Imaging (2010)

Bottom Line: Maternal diabetes results in significantly greater risk for antenatal, perinatal, and neonatal morbidity and mortality, as well as congenital malformations.Timely, accurate, and proper radiological evaluation can reduce morbidity and mortality in these infants.The purpose of this essay is to illustrate the imaging findings in the various pathological conditions involving the major body systems in the offspring of women with diabetes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Diagnostic Radiology, King Saud University, College of Medicine and King Khalid University Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

ABSTRACT
About 3 to 10% of pregnancies are complicated by glycemic control abnormalities. Maternal diabetes results in significantly greater risk for antenatal, perinatal, and neonatal morbidity and mortality, as well as congenital malformations. The number of diabetic mothers is expected to rise, as more and more of the obese pediatric female population in developed and some developing countries progresses to childbearing age. Radiologists, being part of the teams managing such pregnancies, should be well aware of the findings that may be encountered in infants of diabetic mothers. Timely, accurate, and proper radiological evaluation can reduce morbidity and mortality in these infants. The purpose of this essay is to illustrate the imaging findings in the various pathological conditions involving the major body systems in the offspring of women with diabetes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Small left colon syndrome: Frontal radiograph of the abdomen as part of a contrast enema examination using iodinated contrast (gastrografin) shows a narrow caliber of the left colon, with an abrupt transition at the splenic flexure. Multiple filling defects in the left colon are due to meconium plugs (arrow). Also note the rectum is quite distensible
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Figure 0013: Small left colon syndrome: Frontal radiograph of the abdomen as part of a contrast enema examination using iodinated contrast (gastrografin) shows a narrow caliber of the left colon, with an abrupt transition at the splenic flexure. Multiple filling defects in the left colon are due to meconium plugs (arrow). Also note the rectum is quite distensible

Mentions: Meconium plug syndrome and small left colon are two overlapping entities in the spectrum of functional neonatal intestinal obstruction.[21] Radiologists use the two term synonymously, or simply the term ‘functional immaturity of colon’ which is a common cause of neonatal distal bowel obstruction in IDMs.[22] In meconium plug syndrome, there is distension of the cecum up to the transverse portion of the colon, with the transition near the splenic flexure; the left-sided colon is narrow and the rectum is quite distensible. Inspissated meconium causes multiple filling defects in the distended portion which may include the distal ileum [Figure 13]. Half of these cases are associated with maternal diabetes. It is important to differentiate meconium plug syndrome from Hirschsprung disease [Table 3].


Pictorial Essay: Infants of diabetic mothers.

Alorainy IA, Barlas NB, Al-Boukai AA - Indian J Radiol Imaging (2010)

Small left colon syndrome: Frontal radiograph of the abdomen as part of a contrast enema examination using iodinated contrast (gastrografin) shows a narrow caliber of the left colon, with an abrupt transition at the splenic flexure. Multiple filling defects in the left colon are due to meconium plugs (arrow). Also note the rectum is quite distensible
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2963757&req=5

Figure 0013: Small left colon syndrome: Frontal radiograph of the abdomen as part of a contrast enema examination using iodinated contrast (gastrografin) shows a narrow caliber of the left colon, with an abrupt transition at the splenic flexure. Multiple filling defects in the left colon are due to meconium plugs (arrow). Also note the rectum is quite distensible
Mentions: Meconium plug syndrome and small left colon are two overlapping entities in the spectrum of functional neonatal intestinal obstruction.[21] Radiologists use the two term synonymously, or simply the term ‘functional immaturity of colon’ which is a common cause of neonatal distal bowel obstruction in IDMs.[22] In meconium plug syndrome, there is distension of the cecum up to the transverse portion of the colon, with the transition near the splenic flexure; the left-sided colon is narrow and the rectum is quite distensible. Inspissated meconium causes multiple filling defects in the distended portion which may include the distal ileum [Figure 13]. Half of these cases are associated with maternal diabetes. It is important to differentiate meconium plug syndrome from Hirschsprung disease [Table 3].

Bottom Line: Maternal diabetes results in significantly greater risk for antenatal, perinatal, and neonatal morbidity and mortality, as well as congenital malformations.Timely, accurate, and proper radiological evaluation can reduce morbidity and mortality in these infants.The purpose of this essay is to illustrate the imaging findings in the various pathological conditions involving the major body systems in the offspring of women with diabetes.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Diagnostic Radiology, King Saud University, College of Medicine and King Khalid University Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia.

ABSTRACT
About 3 to 10% of pregnancies are complicated by glycemic control abnormalities. Maternal diabetes results in significantly greater risk for antenatal, perinatal, and neonatal morbidity and mortality, as well as congenital malformations. The number of diabetic mothers is expected to rise, as more and more of the obese pediatric female population in developed and some developing countries progresses to childbearing age. Radiologists, being part of the teams managing such pregnancies, should be well aware of the findings that may be encountered in infants of diabetic mothers. Timely, accurate, and proper radiological evaluation can reduce morbidity and mortality in these infants. The purpose of this essay is to illustrate the imaging findings in the various pathological conditions involving the major body systems in the offspring of women with diabetes.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus