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Specified species in gingival crevicular fluid predict bacterial diversity.

Asikainen S, Doğan B, Turgut Z, Paster BJ, Bodur A, Oscarsson J - PLoS ONE (2010)

Bottom Line: PLS regression analysis showed that species of genera including Campylobacter, Selenomonas, Porphyromonas, Catonella, Tannerella, Dialister, Peptostreptococcus, Streptococcus and Eubacterium had significant positive correlations and the number of teeth with low-grade attachment loss a significant negative correlation to species diversity in GCF samples.OPLS/O2PLS discriminant analysis revealed significant positive correlations to GCF sample group membership for species of genera Campylobacter, Leptotrichia, Prevotella, Dialister, Tannerella, Haemophilus, Fusobacterium, Eubacterium, and Actinomyces.Among a variety of detected species those traditionally classified as Gram-negative anaerobes growing in mature subgingival biofilms were the main predictors for species diversity in GCF samples as well as responsible for distinguishing GCF samples from PP samples.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Section of Oral Microbiology, Institute of Odontology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. sirkka.asikainen@odont.umu.se

ABSTRACT

Background: Analysis of gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) samples may give information of unattached (planktonic) subgingival bacteria. Our study represents the first one targeting the identity of bacteria in GCF.

Methodology/principal findings: We determined bacterial species diversity in GCF samples of a group of periodontitis patients and delineated contributing bacterial and host-associated factors. Subgingival paper point (PP) samples from the same sites were taken for comparison. After DNA extraction, 16S rRNA genes were PCR amplified and DNA-DNA hybridization was performed using a microarray for over 300 bacterial species or groups. Altogether 133 species from 41 genera and 8 phyla were detected with 9 to 62 and 18 to 64 species in GCF and PP samples, respectively, per patient. Projection to latent structures by means of partial least squares (PLS) was applied to the multivariate data analysis. PLS regression analysis showed that species of genera including Campylobacter, Selenomonas, Porphyromonas, Catonella, Tannerella, Dialister, Peptostreptococcus, Streptococcus and Eubacterium had significant positive correlations and the number of teeth with low-grade attachment loss a significant negative correlation to species diversity in GCF samples. OPLS/O2PLS discriminant analysis revealed significant positive correlations to GCF sample group membership for species of genera Campylobacter, Leptotrichia, Prevotella, Dialister, Tannerella, Haemophilus, Fusobacterium, Eubacterium, and Actinomyces.

Conclusions/significance: Among a variety of detected species those traditionally classified as Gram-negative anaerobes growing in mature subgingival biofilms were the main predictors for species diversity in GCF samples as well as responsible for distinguishing GCF samples from PP samples. GCF bacteria may provide new prospects for studying dynamic properties of subgingival biofilms.

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Distribution pattern for species/phylotypes in GCF samples and subgingival PP samples.The bars show proportion of GCF and PP samples of all samples testing positive for the depicted species/phylotypes. The numbers in parentheses after species definitions show the number of positive samples in both types of samples (PP;GCF). Yellow bars PP samples, red bars GCF samples. PP: paper point; GCF: gingival crevicular fluid.
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pone-0013589-g003: Distribution pattern for species/phylotypes in GCF samples and subgingival PP samples.The bars show proportion of GCF and PP samples of all samples testing positive for the depicted species/phylotypes. The numbers in parentheses after species definitions show the number of positive samples in both types of samples (PP;GCF). Yellow bars PP samples, red bars GCF samples. PP: paper point; GCF: gingival crevicular fluid.

Mentions: We subsequently asked whether the composition of the bacterial populations identified in GCF samples differed from those identified in PP samples obtained from the same periodontal sites as the GCF samples. The overall species/phylotype diversity in PP samples, ranging from 18 to 64 bacterial species (mean 41.8, SD 12.0) per patient, resembled that in GCF samples (data above). Figure 3 demonstrates the distribution pattern of the 133 species or groups shown as detection frequency and percentage of all samples positive for the depicted species/phylotype in the GCF and PP samples, separately. Except for 15 (11%) species found only in GCF samples and 17 (13%) species found only in PP samples, the majority (N = 101, 76%) of the 133 species/phylotypes were identified in both sample types; 23 (23%) more often in GCF than PP samples and 58 (57%) more often in PP than GCF samples (Figure 3).


Specified species in gingival crevicular fluid predict bacterial diversity.

Asikainen S, Doğan B, Turgut Z, Paster BJ, Bodur A, Oscarsson J - PLoS ONE (2010)

Distribution pattern for species/phylotypes in GCF samples and subgingival PP samples.The bars show proportion of GCF and PP samples of all samples testing positive for the depicted species/phylotypes. The numbers in parentheses after species definitions show the number of positive samples in both types of samples (PP;GCF). Yellow bars PP samples, red bars GCF samples. PP: paper point; GCF: gingival crevicular fluid.
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2963608&req=5

pone-0013589-g003: Distribution pattern for species/phylotypes in GCF samples and subgingival PP samples.The bars show proportion of GCF and PP samples of all samples testing positive for the depicted species/phylotypes. The numbers in parentheses after species definitions show the number of positive samples in both types of samples (PP;GCF). Yellow bars PP samples, red bars GCF samples. PP: paper point; GCF: gingival crevicular fluid.
Mentions: We subsequently asked whether the composition of the bacterial populations identified in GCF samples differed from those identified in PP samples obtained from the same periodontal sites as the GCF samples. The overall species/phylotype diversity in PP samples, ranging from 18 to 64 bacterial species (mean 41.8, SD 12.0) per patient, resembled that in GCF samples (data above). Figure 3 demonstrates the distribution pattern of the 133 species or groups shown as detection frequency and percentage of all samples positive for the depicted species/phylotype in the GCF and PP samples, separately. Except for 15 (11%) species found only in GCF samples and 17 (13%) species found only in PP samples, the majority (N = 101, 76%) of the 133 species/phylotypes were identified in both sample types; 23 (23%) more often in GCF than PP samples and 58 (57%) more often in PP than GCF samples (Figure 3).

Bottom Line: PLS regression analysis showed that species of genera including Campylobacter, Selenomonas, Porphyromonas, Catonella, Tannerella, Dialister, Peptostreptococcus, Streptococcus and Eubacterium had significant positive correlations and the number of teeth with low-grade attachment loss a significant negative correlation to species diversity in GCF samples.OPLS/O2PLS discriminant analysis revealed significant positive correlations to GCF sample group membership for species of genera Campylobacter, Leptotrichia, Prevotella, Dialister, Tannerella, Haemophilus, Fusobacterium, Eubacterium, and Actinomyces.Among a variety of detected species those traditionally classified as Gram-negative anaerobes growing in mature subgingival biofilms were the main predictors for species diversity in GCF samples as well as responsible for distinguishing GCF samples from PP samples.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Section of Oral Microbiology, Institute of Odontology, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden. sirkka.asikainen@odont.umu.se

ABSTRACT

Background: Analysis of gingival crevicular fluid (GCF) samples may give information of unattached (planktonic) subgingival bacteria. Our study represents the first one targeting the identity of bacteria in GCF.

Methodology/principal findings: We determined bacterial species diversity in GCF samples of a group of periodontitis patients and delineated contributing bacterial and host-associated factors. Subgingival paper point (PP) samples from the same sites were taken for comparison. After DNA extraction, 16S rRNA genes were PCR amplified and DNA-DNA hybridization was performed using a microarray for over 300 bacterial species or groups. Altogether 133 species from 41 genera and 8 phyla were detected with 9 to 62 and 18 to 64 species in GCF and PP samples, respectively, per patient. Projection to latent structures by means of partial least squares (PLS) was applied to the multivariate data analysis. PLS regression analysis showed that species of genera including Campylobacter, Selenomonas, Porphyromonas, Catonella, Tannerella, Dialister, Peptostreptococcus, Streptococcus and Eubacterium had significant positive correlations and the number of teeth with low-grade attachment loss a significant negative correlation to species diversity in GCF samples. OPLS/O2PLS discriminant analysis revealed significant positive correlations to GCF sample group membership for species of genera Campylobacter, Leptotrichia, Prevotella, Dialister, Tannerella, Haemophilus, Fusobacterium, Eubacterium, and Actinomyces.

Conclusions/significance: Among a variety of detected species those traditionally classified as Gram-negative anaerobes growing in mature subgingival biofilms were the main predictors for species diversity in GCF samples as well as responsible for distinguishing GCF samples from PP samples. GCF bacteria may provide new prospects for studying dynamic properties of subgingival biofilms.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus