Limits...
Effect of oral sebacic Acid on postprandial glycemia, insulinemia, and glucose rate of appearance in type 2 diabetes.

Iaconelli A, Gastaldelli A, Chiellini C, Gniuli D, Favuzzi A, Binnert C, Macé K, Mingrone G - Diabetes Care (2010)

Bottom Line: When fats were substituted with 23 g C10, AUC of Ra was significantly reduced on the order of 18% (P<0.05) in both healthy and diabetic subjects.This increase was associated with a 1.7-fold raise of GLUT4.This beneficial effect was associated with a reduction in glucose Ra, probably due to lowered hepatic glucose output and increased peripheral glucose disposal.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Internal Medicine, Catholic University of Rome, Rome, Italy.

ABSTRACT

Objective: Dicarboxylic acids are natural products with the potential of being an alternate dietary source of energy. We aimed to evaluate the effect of sebacic acid (a 10-carbon dicarboxylic acid; C10) ingestion on postprandial glycemia and glucose rate of appearance (Ra) in healthy and type 2 diabetic subjects. Furthermore, the effect of C10 on insulin-mediated glucose uptake and on GLUT4 expression was assessed in L6 muscle cells in vitro.

Research design and methods: Subjects ingested a mixed meal (50% carbohydrates, 15% proteins, and 35% lipids) containing 0 g (control) or 10 g C10 in addition to the meal or 23 g C10 as a substitute of fats.

Results: In type 2 diabetic subjects, the incremental glucose area under the curve (AUC) decreased by 42% (P<0.05) and 70% (P<0.05) in the 10 g C10 and 23 g C10 groups, respectively. At the largest amounts used, C10 reduced the glucose AUC in healthy volunteers also. When fats were substituted with 23 g C10, AUC of Ra was significantly reduced on the order of 18% (P<0.05) in both healthy and diabetic subjects. The insulin-dependent glucose uptake by L6 cells was increased in the presence of C10 (38.7±10.3 vs. 11.4±5.4%; P=0.026). This increase was associated with a 1.7-fold raise of GLUT4.

Conclusions: Sebacic acid significantly reduced hyperglycemia after a meal in type 2 diabetic subjects. This beneficial effect was associated with a reduction in glucose Ra, probably due to lowered hepatic glucose output and increased peripheral glucose disposal.

Show MeSH

Related in: MedlinePlus

Time course of plasma glucose (millimoles per liter), insulin (picomoles per liter), and sebacic acid concentrations (micrograms per milliliter) in healthy volunteers (left panels) and in type 2 diabetic subjects (right panels). ■, control study (0 g C10); ○, 10 g C10 study; , 23 g C10 study. Data are means ± SE. As indicated by an arrow, the meal was ingested after 120 min of 6,6-d2-glucose-primed constant infusion to assess basal glucose Ra.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2963488&req=5

Figure 1: Time course of plasma glucose (millimoles per liter), insulin (picomoles per liter), and sebacic acid concentrations (micrograms per milliliter) in healthy volunteers (left panels) and in type 2 diabetic subjects (right panels). ■, control study (0 g C10); ○, 10 g C10 study; , 23 g C10 study. Data are means ± SE. As indicated by an arrow, the meal was ingested after 120 min of 6,6-d2-glucose-primed constant infusion to assess basal glucose Ra.

Mentions: All subjects ingested a mixed meal (see research design and methods) containing either 0 g (control) and an additional 10 g C10 or 23 g C10 as a substitute of dietary fats. The time courses of plasma glucose and insulin in healthy control subjects are shown in Fig. 1. The ingestion of C10 together with the meal reduced to some extent the glycemic peak, but the glucose incremental AUC was significantly reduced only after 23 g C10 (Fig. 2). The insulin peak level was clearly reduced in both C10 groups, attaining a value of −39% in the 10 g C10 group and −71% in the 23 g C10 group (both P < 0.01) (Fig. 2).


Effect of oral sebacic Acid on postprandial glycemia, insulinemia, and glucose rate of appearance in type 2 diabetes.

Iaconelli A, Gastaldelli A, Chiellini C, Gniuli D, Favuzzi A, Binnert C, Macé K, Mingrone G - Diabetes Care (2010)

Time course of plasma glucose (millimoles per liter), insulin (picomoles per liter), and sebacic acid concentrations (micrograms per milliliter) in healthy volunteers (left panels) and in type 2 diabetic subjects (right panels). ■, control study (0 g C10); ○, 10 g C10 study; , 23 g C10 study. Data are means ± SE. As indicated by an arrow, the meal was ingested after 120 min of 6,6-d2-glucose-primed constant infusion to assess basal glucose Ra.
© Copyright Policy - creative-commons
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2963488&req=5

Figure 1: Time course of plasma glucose (millimoles per liter), insulin (picomoles per liter), and sebacic acid concentrations (micrograms per milliliter) in healthy volunteers (left panels) and in type 2 diabetic subjects (right panels). ■, control study (0 g C10); ○, 10 g C10 study; , 23 g C10 study. Data are means ± SE. As indicated by an arrow, the meal was ingested after 120 min of 6,6-d2-glucose-primed constant infusion to assess basal glucose Ra.
Mentions: All subjects ingested a mixed meal (see research design and methods) containing either 0 g (control) and an additional 10 g C10 or 23 g C10 as a substitute of dietary fats. The time courses of plasma glucose and insulin in healthy control subjects are shown in Fig. 1. The ingestion of C10 together with the meal reduced to some extent the glycemic peak, but the glucose incremental AUC was significantly reduced only after 23 g C10 (Fig. 2). The insulin peak level was clearly reduced in both C10 groups, attaining a value of −39% in the 10 g C10 group and −71% in the 23 g C10 group (both P < 0.01) (Fig. 2).

Bottom Line: When fats were substituted with 23 g C10, AUC of Ra was significantly reduced on the order of 18% (P<0.05) in both healthy and diabetic subjects.This increase was associated with a 1.7-fold raise of GLUT4.This beneficial effect was associated with a reduction in glucose Ra, probably due to lowered hepatic glucose output and increased peripheral glucose disposal.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Internal Medicine, Catholic University of Rome, Rome, Italy.

ABSTRACT

Objective: Dicarboxylic acids are natural products with the potential of being an alternate dietary source of energy. We aimed to evaluate the effect of sebacic acid (a 10-carbon dicarboxylic acid; C10) ingestion on postprandial glycemia and glucose rate of appearance (Ra) in healthy and type 2 diabetic subjects. Furthermore, the effect of C10 on insulin-mediated glucose uptake and on GLUT4 expression was assessed in L6 muscle cells in vitro.

Research design and methods: Subjects ingested a mixed meal (50% carbohydrates, 15% proteins, and 35% lipids) containing 0 g (control) or 10 g C10 in addition to the meal or 23 g C10 as a substitute of fats.

Results: In type 2 diabetic subjects, the incremental glucose area under the curve (AUC) decreased by 42% (P<0.05) and 70% (P<0.05) in the 10 g C10 and 23 g C10 groups, respectively. At the largest amounts used, C10 reduced the glucose AUC in healthy volunteers also. When fats were substituted with 23 g C10, AUC of Ra was significantly reduced on the order of 18% (P<0.05) in both healthy and diabetic subjects. The insulin-dependent glucose uptake by L6 cells was increased in the presence of C10 (38.7±10.3 vs. 11.4±5.4%; P=0.026). This increase was associated with a 1.7-fold raise of GLUT4.

Conclusions: Sebacic acid significantly reduced hyperglycemia after a meal in type 2 diabetic subjects. This beneficial effect was associated with a reduction in glucose Ra, probably due to lowered hepatic glucose output and increased peripheral glucose disposal.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus