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Ultra-porous titanium oxide scaffold with high compressive strength.

Tiainen H, Lyngstadaas SP, Ellingsen JE, Haugen HJ - J Mater Sci Mater Med (2010)

Bottom Line: Strong correlation was found between compressive strength and both replication times and solid content in the ceramic slurry.Increase in the solid content resulted in more favourable sponge loading, which was achieved due to the more suitable rheological properties of the ceramic slurry.Repeated replication process induced only negligible changes in the pore architectural parameters indicating a reduced flaw size in the scaffold struts.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biomaterials, Institute for Clinical Dentistry, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.

ABSTRACT
Highly porous and well interconnected titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) scaffolds with compressive strength above 2.5 MPa were fabricated without compromising the desired pore architectural characteristics, such as high porosity, appropriate pore size, surface-to-volume ratio, and interconnectivity. Processing parameters and pore architectural characteristics were investigated in order to identify the key processing steps and morphological properties that contributed to the enhanced strength of the scaffolds. Cleaning of the TiO(2) raw powder removed phosphates but introduced sodium into the powder, which was suggested to decrease the slurry stability. Strong correlation was found between compressive strength and both replication times and solid content in the ceramic slurry. Increase in the solid content resulted in more favourable sponge loading, which was achieved due to the more suitable rheological properties of the ceramic slurry. Repeated replication process induced only negligible changes in the pore architectural parameters indicating a reduced flaw size in the scaffold struts. The fabricated TiO(2) scaffolds show great promise as load-bearing bone scaffolds for applications where moderate mechanical support is required.

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Pore diameter (a) and strut thickness (b) distributions for scaffolds fabricated using different processing parameters
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Fig4: Pore diameter (a) and strut thickness (b) distributions for scaffolds fabricated using different processing parameters

Mentions: Figure 4 presents the pore diameter and strut thickness distributions for three randomly selected scaffolds that were fabricated using different processing parameters. These three scaffolds were also found representative for the three different groups. A statistically significant difference in the mean pore diameters of the scaffolds was detected between scaffolds manufactured using different powder content in the slurry. Increased solid content in the ceramic slurry caused a slight shift in the mean pore diameter towards smaller diameters. Similar effect was also noted in the pore size distribution (Fig. 4a). However, the solid content in the ceramic slurry had no significant effect on the mean strut thickness of the scaffolds. Neither was a statistical difference detected between the mean strut thicknesses of single- and double-coated scaffolds. Nevertheless, the strut thickness distribution was considerably narrower for the scaffolds that were fabricated using slurries with higher solid content (single-coated and double-coated). Furthermore, it was noted that the second replication did not have a significant effect on the strut thickness distribution (Fig. 4b). However, some changes were observed in the fractal dimension of the scaffold struts due to the difference in the processing parameters. Increase in the solid content was found to result in scaffolds with higher fractal dimensions, whereas the repeated replication led to slightly decreased fractal dimensions (Table 2). Accordingly, statistically significant difference was detected between both different solid contents and different replication times.Fig. 4


Ultra-porous titanium oxide scaffold with high compressive strength.

Tiainen H, Lyngstadaas SP, Ellingsen JE, Haugen HJ - J Mater Sci Mater Med (2010)

Pore diameter (a) and strut thickness (b) distributions for scaffolds fabricated using different processing parameters
© Copyright Policy
Related In: Results  -  Collection

Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2962783&req=5

Fig4: Pore diameter (a) and strut thickness (b) distributions for scaffolds fabricated using different processing parameters
Mentions: Figure 4 presents the pore diameter and strut thickness distributions for three randomly selected scaffolds that were fabricated using different processing parameters. These three scaffolds were also found representative for the three different groups. A statistically significant difference in the mean pore diameters of the scaffolds was detected between scaffolds manufactured using different powder content in the slurry. Increased solid content in the ceramic slurry caused a slight shift in the mean pore diameter towards smaller diameters. Similar effect was also noted in the pore size distribution (Fig. 4a). However, the solid content in the ceramic slurry had no significant effect on the mean strut thickness of the scaffolds. Neither was a statistical difference detected between the mean strut thicknesses of single- and double-coated scaffolds. Nevertheless, the strut thickness distribution was considerably narrower for the scaffolds that were fabricated using slurries with higher solid content (single-coated and double-coated). Furthermore, it was noted that the second replication did not have a significant effect on the strut thickness distribution (Fig. 4b). However, some changes were observed in the fractal dimension of the scaffold struts due to the difference in the processing parameters. Increase in the solid content was found to result in scaffolds with higher fractal dimensions, whereas the repeated replication led to slightly decreased fractal dimensions (Table 2). Accordingly, statistically significant difference was detected between both different solid contents and different replication times.Fig. 4

Bottom Line: Strong correlation was found between compressive strength and both replication times and solid content in the ceramic slurry.Increase in the solid content resulted in more favourable sponge loading, which was achieved due to the more suitable rheological properties of the ceramic slurry.Repeated replication process induced only negligible changes in the pore architectural parameters indicating a reduced flaw size in the scaffold struts.

View Article: PubMed Central - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Biomaterials, Institute for Clinical Dentistry, University of Oslo, Oslo, Norway.

ABSTRACT
Highly porous and well interconnected titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) scaffolds with compressive strength above 2.5 MPa were fabricated without compromising the desired pore architectural characteristics, such as high porosity, appropriate pore size, surface-to-volume ratio, and interconnectivity. Processing parameters and pore architectural characteristics were investigated in order to identify the key processing steps and morphological properties that contributed to the enhanced strength of the scaffolds. Cleaning of the TiO(2) raw powder removed phosphates but introduced sodium into the powder, which was suggested to decrease the slurry stability. Strong correlation was found between compressive strength and both replication times and solid content in the ceramic slurry. Increase in the solid content resulted in more favourable sponge loading, which was achieved due to the more suitable rheological properties of the ceramic slurry. Repeated replication process induced only negligible changes in the pore architectural parameters indicating a reduced flaw size in the scaffold struts. The fabricated TiO(2) scaffolds show great promise as load-bearing bone scaffolds for applications where moderate mechanical support is required.

Show MeSH