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Plasmodium ovale infection in Malaysia: first imported case.

Lim YA, Mahmud R, Chew CH, T T, Chua KH - Malar. J. (2010)

Bottom Line: However further analysis using a patented in-house multiplex PCR followed by sequencing confirmed the presence of P. ovale.Given that Anopheles maculatus and Anopheles dirus, vectors of P. ovale are found in Malaysia, this finding has significant implication on Malaysia's public health sector.P. ovale should be considered in the differential diagnosis of imported malaria cases in Malaysia due to the exponential increase in the number of visitors from P. ovale endemic regions and the long latent period of P. ovale.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Parasitology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. limailian@um.edu.my

ABSTRACT

Background: Plasmodium ovale infection is rarely reported in Malaysia. This is the first imported case of P. ovale infection in Malaysia which was initially misdiagnosed as Plasmodium vivax.

Methods: Peripheral blood sample was first examined by Giemsa-stained microscopy examination and further confirmed using a patented in-house multiplex PCR followed by sequencing.

Results and discussion: Initial results from peripheral blood smear examination diagnosed P. vivax infection. However further analysis using a patented in-house multiplex PCR followed by sequencing confirmed the presence of P. ovale. Given that Anopheles maculatus and Anopheles dirus, vectors of P. ovale are found in Malaysia, this finding has significant implication on Malaysia's public health sector.

Conclusions: The current finding should serve as an alert to epidemiologists, clinicians and laboratory technicians in the possibility of finding P. ovale in Malaysia. P. ovale should be considered in the differential diagnosis of imported malaria cases in Malaysia due to the exponential increase in the number of visitors from P. ovale endemic regions and the long latent period of P. ovale. It is also timely that conventional diagnosis of malaria via microscopy should be coupled with more advanced molecular tools for effective diagnosis.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Phylogenetic analyses of SSU rRNA sequence data representing Plasmodium ovale from a patient (POM1) using Bayesian inference (BI). Sequences from the present study as well as reference sequences representing P. ovale, P. falciparum, P. vivax and P. malariae (acquired from GenBank) are indicated. Posterior probabilities are indicated at all major nodes.
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Figure 2: Phylogenetic analyses of SSU rRNA sequence data representing Plasmodium ovale from a patient (POM1) using Bayesian inference (BI). Sequences from the present study as well as reference sequences representing P. ovale, P. falciparum, P. vivax and P. malariae (acquired from GenBank) are indicated. Posterior probabilities are indicated at all major nodes.

Mentions: Plasmodium falciparum [GenBank accession number M19172] [11], P. vivax [GenBank accession number X13926] [12], P. malariae [GenBank accession number AF487999] [13], P. knowlesi [GenBank accession number L07560] [14], were used as the out groups in the analysis of SSU rRNA sequence data for P. ovale. Upon the completion of the Bayesian analysis, a 50% majority-rule consensus tree for each species was constructed in Treeview × v.0.5. Analysis of SSU rRNA sequence data inferred the patient was indeed infected with P. ovale and not P. vivax as initially diagnosed by microscopy (Figure 2).


Plasmodium ovale infection in Malaysia: first imported case.

Lim YA, Mahmud R, Chew CH, T T, Chua KH - Malar. J. (2010)

Phylogenetic analyses of SSU rRNA sequence data representing Plasmodium ovale from a patient (POM1) using Bayesian inference (BI). Sequences from the present study as well as reference sequences representing P. ovale, P. falciparum, P. vivax and P. malariae (acquired from GenBank) are indicated. Posterior probabilities are indicated at all major nodes.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2959071&req=5

Figure 2: Phylogenetic analyses of SSU rRNA sequence data representing Plasmodium ovale from a patient (POM1) using Bayesian inference (BI). Sequences from the present study as well as reference sequences representing P. ovale, P. falciparum, P. vivax and P. malariae (acquired from GenBank) are indicated. Posterior probabilities are indicated at all major nodes.
Mentions: Plasmodium falciparum [GenBank accession number M19172] [11], P. vivax [GenBank accession number X13926] [12], P. malariae [GenBank accession number AF487999] [13], P. knowlesi [GenBank accession number L07560] [14], were used as the out groups in the analysis of SSU rRNA sequence data for P. ovale. Upon the completion of the Bayesian analysis, a 50% majority-rule consensus tree for each species was constructed in Treeview × v.0.5. Analysis of SSU rRNA sequence data inferred the patient was indeed infected with P. ovale and not P. vivax as initially diagnosed by microscopy (Figure 2).

Bottom Line: However further analysis using a patented in-house multiplex PCR followed by sequencing confirmed the presence of P. ovale.Given that Anopheles maculatus and Anopheles dirus, vectors of P. ovale are found in Malaysia, this finding has significant implication on Malaysia's public health sector.P. ovale should be considered in the differential diagnosis of imported malaria cases in Malaysia due to the exponential increase in the number of visitors from P. ovale endemic regions and the long latent period of P. ovale.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Parasitology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. limailian@um.edu.my

ABSTRACT

Background: Plasmodium ovale infection is rarely reported in Malaysia. This is the first imported case of P. ovale infection in Malaysia which was initially misdiagnosed as Plasmodium vivax.

Methods: Peripheral blood sample was first examined by Giemsa-stained microscopy examination and further confirmed using a patented in-house multiplex PCR followed by sequencing.

Results and discussion: Initial results from peripheral blood smear examination diagnosed P. vivax infection. However further analysis using a patented in-house multiplex PCR followed by sequencing confirmed the presence of P. ovale. Given that Anopheles maculatus and Anopheles dirus, vectors of P. ovale are found in Malaysia, this finding has significant implication on Malaysia's public health sector.

Conclusions: The current finding should serve as an alert to epidemiologists, clinicians and laboratory technicians in the possibility of finding P. ovale in Malaysia. P. ovale should be considered in the differential diagnosis of imported malaria cases in Malaysia due to the exponential increase in the number of visitors from P. ovale endemic regions and the long latent period of P. ovale. It is also timely that conventional diagnosis of malaria via microscopy should be coupled with more advanced molecular tools for effective diagnosis.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus