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C-reactive protein serum levels as an early predictor of outcome in patients with pandemic H1N1 influenza A virus infection.

Zimmerman O, Rogowski O, Aviram G, Mizrahi M, Zeltser D, Justo D, Dahan E, Arad R, Touvia O, Tau L, Tarabeia J, Berliner S, Paran Y - BMC Infect. Dis. (2010)

Bottom Line: The median admission serum CRP levels were significantly higher among patients who required subsequent ICU care and mechanical ventilation than among patients who did not (123 mg/L and 112 mg/L vs. 40 mg/L, p < .001 and 43 mg/L, p = .017, respectively).At the same time point, 19% of the patients with admission serum CRP level ≥70 mg/L (upper tertile) needed to be admitted to the ICU and 8% of the same upper tertile group required mechanical ventilation.The differences in the rates between the lower vs. upper tertile groups were significant (Log-Rank p < .001 for ICU and p < .024 for mechanical ventilation).

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Internal Medicine D, Tel-Aviv Sourasky Medical Center and the Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv, Israel. oferzim@gmail.com

ABSTRACT

Background: Data for predicting which patients with pandemic influenza A (H1N1) infection are likely to run a complicated course are sparse. We retrospectively studied whether the admission serum C-reactive protein (CRP) levels can serve as a predictor of illness severity.

Methods: Included were all consecutive adult patients who presented to the emergency department (ED) between May-December, 2009 with a flu-like illness, a confirmed diagnosis of pandemic influenza A (H1N1) infection and a serum CRP level measured within 24 hours of presentation. Patients with a proven additional concurrent acute illness (e.g., bacteremia) were excluded. We used the ROC curve analysis, Kaplan-Meier curves and the Cox proportional hazard model to evaluate the predictive ability of CRP as a prognostic factor.

Results: Seventeen (9%) of the 191 enrolled patients were admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU), of whom eight (4%) required mechanical ventilation and three (2%) died. The median admission serum CRP levels were significantly higher among patients who required subsequent ICU care and mechanical ventilation than among patients who did not (123 mg/L and 112 mg/L vs. 40 mg/L, p < .001 and 43 mg/L, p = .017, respectively). A Cox proportional hazard model identified admission serum CRP levels and auscultatory findings over the lungs as independent prognostic factors for ICU admission. Admission serum CRP levels were the only independent prognostic factor for mechanical ventilation. Thirty days after presenting to the ED, none of the patients with admission serum CRP level <28 mg/L (lower tertile) required either ICU admission or mechanical ventilation. At the same time point, 19% of the patients with admission serum CRP level ≥70 mg/L (upper tertile) needed to be admitted to the ICU and 8% of the same upper tertile group required mechanical ventilation. The differences in the rates between the lower vs. upper tertile groups were significant (Log-Rank p < .001 for ICU and p < .024 for mechanical ventilation).

Conclusions: In our study group, serum CRP levels obtained in the early ED admission stage from patients presenting with pandemic H1N1 influenza A infection were found to serve as a useful gauge for predicting disease course and assisting in patient management.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Kaplan Meier analysis displaying the cumulative probability of not reaching the outcome measure of intensive care unit admission for patients according to tertiles of serum CRP levels on admission to the emergency department. The blue line represents <28 mg/L, the red line 28-69 mg/L, and the green line ≥70 mg/L.
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Figure 3: Kaplan Meier analysis displaying the cumulative probability of not reaching the outcome measure of intensive care unit admission for patients according to tertiles of serum CRP levels on admission to the emergency department. The blue line represents <28 mg/L, the red line 28-69 mg/L, and the green line ≥70 mg/L.

Mentions: A Kaplan-Meier estimate of the two main outcome measures, i.e., the need for ICU admission and for mechanical ventilation, was performed using tertiles of serum CRP levels (i.e., <28, 28-69, and ≥70 mg/L). At the 30-day time point since their presentation to the ED, none of the patients with a serum CRP level <28 mg/L (lower tertile) needed to be admitted to the ICU or required mechanical ventilation (Figures 3 and 4). At the same time point, 19% of the patients with a serum CRP level ≥70 mg/L (upper tertile) needed to be admitted to the ICU and 8% required mechanical ventilation. The differences in the rates between the lower vs. upper tertile groups were significant (Log-Rank p < .001 for ICU and p < .024 for mechanical ventilation).


C-reactive protein serum levels as an early predictor of outcome in patients with pandemic H1N1 influenza A virus infection.

Zimmerman O, Rogowski O, Aviram G, Mizrahi M, Zeltser D, Justo D, Dahan E, Arad R, Touvia O, Tau L, Tarabeia J, Berliner S, Paran Y - BMC Infect. Dis. (2010)

Kaplan Meier analysis displaying the cumulative probability of not reaching the outcome measure of intensive care unit admission for patients according to tertiles of serum CRP levels on admission to the emergency department. The blue line represents <28 mg/L, the red line 28-69 mg/L, and the green line ≥70 mg/L.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2959060&req=5

Figure 3: Kaplan Meier analysis displaying the cumulative probability of not reaching the outcome measure of intensive care unit admission for patients according to tertiles of serum CRP levels on admission to the emergency department. The blue line represents <28 mg/L, the red line 28-69 mg/L, and the green line ≥70 mg/L.
Mentions: A Kaplan-Meier estimate of the two main outcome measures, i.e., the need for ICU admission and for mechanical ventilation, was performed using tertiles of serum CRP levels (i.e., <28, 28-69, and ≥70 mg/L). At the 30-day time point since their presentation to the ED, none of the patients with a serum CRP level <28 mg/L (lower tertile) needed to be admitted to the ICU or required mechanical ventilation (Figures 3 and 4). At the same time point, 19% of the patients with a serum CRP level ≥70 mg/L (upper tertile) needed to be admitted to the ICU and 8% required mechanical ventilation. The differences in the rates between the lower vs. upper tertile groups were significant (Log-Rank p < .001 for ICU and p < .024 for mechanical ventilation).

Bottom Line: The median admission serum CRP levels were significantly higher among patients who required subsequent ICU care and mechanical ventilation than among patients who did not (123 mg/L and 112 mg/L vs. 40 mg/L, p < .001 and 43 mg/L, p = .017, respectively).At the same time point, 19% of the patients with admission serum CRP level ≥70 mg/L (upper tertile) needed to be admitted to the ICU and 8% of the same upper tertile group required mechanical ventilation.The differences in the rates between the lower vs. upper tertile groups were significant (Log-Rank p < .001 for ICU and p < .024 for mechanical ventilation).

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Internal Medicine D, Tel-Aviv Sourasky Medical Center and the Sackler Faculty of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Tel-Aviv, Israel. oferzim@gmail.com

ABSTRACT

Background: Data for predicting which patients with pandemic influenza A (H1N1) infection are likely to run a complicated course are sparse. We retrospectively studied whether the admission serum C-reactive protein (CRP) levels can serve as a predictor of illness severity.

Methods: Included were all consecutive adult patients who presented to the emergency department (ED) between May-December, 2009 with a flu-like illness, a confirmed diagnosis of pandemic influenza A (H1N1) infection and a serum CRP level measured within 24 hours of presentation. Patients with a proven additional concurrent acute illness (e.g., bacteremia) were excluded. We used the ROC curve analysis, Kaplan-Meier curves and the Cox proportional hazard model to evaluate the predictive ability of CRP as a prognostic factor.

Results: Seventeen (9%) of the 191 enrolled patients were admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU), of whom eight (4%) required mechanical ventilation and three (2%) died. The median admission serum CRP levels were significantly higher among patients who required subsequent ICU care and mechanical ventilation than among patients who did not (123 mg/L and 112 mg/L vs. 40 mg/L, p < .001 and 43 mg/L, p = .017, respectively). A Cox proportional hazard model identified admission serum CRP levels and auscultatory findings over the lungs as independent prognostic factors for ICU admission. Admission serum CRP levels were the only independent prognostic factor for mechanical ventilation. Thirty days after presenting to the ED, none of the patients with admission serum CRP level <28 mg/L (lower tertile) required either ICU admission or mechanical ventilation. At the same time point, 19% of the patients with admission serum CRP level ≥70 mg/L (upper tertile) needed to be admitted to the ICU and 8% of the same upper tertile group required mechanical ventilation. The differences in the rates between the lower vs. upper tertile groups were significant (Log-Rank p < .001 for ICU and p < .024 for mechanical ventilation).

Conclusions: In our study group, serum CRP levels obtained in the early ED admission stage from patients presenting with pandemic H1N1 influenza A infection were found to serve as a useful gauge for predicting disease course and assisting in patient management.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus