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Longitudinal monitoring of CA125 levels provides additional information about survival in ovarian cancer.

Gupta D, Lammersfeld CA, Vashi PG, Braun DP - J Ovarian Res (2010)

Bottom Line: Patients with a reduced CA125 at 3 months had a significantly better survival than those with increased CA125 at 3 months.Patients with normal values of CA125 at both baseline and 3 months had the best overall survival.Patients without a significant decline in CA125 after 3 months of therapy have a particularly poor prognosis.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Cancer Treatment Centers of America® at Midwestern Regional Medical Center, Zion, IL, 60099, USA. gupta_digant@yahoo.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: We investigated the prognostic impact of changes in serum CA125 levels during the first 3 months of therapy in ovarian cancer.

Methods: A case series of 170 ovarian cancer patients treated at Cancer Treatment Centers of America. Based on CA125 levels at baseline and 3 months, patients were classified into 4 groups: 1) Normal (0-35 U/ml) at baseline and three months; 2) High (>35 U/ml) at baseline, normal at three months; 3) Normal at baseline, high at 3 months; 4) High at baseline and three months. Kaplan Meier method was used to calculate survival across the 4 categories.

Results: Of 170 patients, 36 were newly diagnosed while 134 had received prior treatment. 25 had stage I disease at diagnosis, 15 stage II, 106 stage III and 14 stage IV. The median age at presentation was 54.2 years (range 23.1 - 82.5 years). At baseline, 31 patients had normal (0-35 U/ml) serum CA125 levels while 139 had high (>35 U/ml) levels. At 3 months, 59 had normal while 111 had high levels. Patients with a reduced CA125 at 3 months had a significantly better survival than those with increased CA125 at 3 months. Patients with normal values of CA125 at both baseline and 3 months had the best overall survival.

Conclusions: These data show that reduction in CA125 after 3 months of therapy is associated with better overall survival in ovarian cancer. Patients without a significant decline in CA125 after 3 months of therapy have a particularly poor prognosis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

Survival Curves for 2 Categories of CA125 at Baseline.
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Figure 1: Survival Curves for 2 Categories of CA125 at Baseline.

Mentions: Figure 1 displays the Kaplan-Meier survival curves for the 2 categories of serum CA125 at baseline. The median survival for patients with normal CA125 (N = 31) was 59.2 months while for those with high CA125 (N = 139) was 18.8 months (log rank = 20.1, p < 0.0001). Figure 2 displays the Kaplan-Meier survival curves for the 2 categories of serum CA125 at 3 months. The median survival for patients with normal CA125 (N = 59) was 56.2 months while for those with high CA125 (N = 111) was 10.7 months (log rank = 44.6, p < 0.0001).


Longitudinal monitoring of CA125 levels provides additional information about survival in ovarian cancer.

Gupta D, Lammersfeld CA, Vashi PG, Braun DP - J Ovarian Res (2010)

Survival Curves for 2 Categories of CA125 at Baseline.
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2959041&req=5

Figure 1: Survival Curves for 2 Categories of CA125 at Baseline.
Mentions: Figure 1 displays the Kaplan-Meier survival curves for the 2 categories of serum CA125 at baseline. The median survival for patients with normal CA125 (N = 31) was 59.2 months while for those with high CA125 (N = 139) was 18.8 months (log rank = 20.1, p < 0.0001). Figure 2 displays the Kaplan-Meier survival curves for the 2 categories of serum CA125 at 3 months. The median survival for patients with normal CA125 (N = 59) was 56.2 months while for those with high CA125 (N = 111) was 10.7 months (log rank = 44.6, p < 0.0001).

Bottom Line: Patients with a reduced CA125 at 3 months had a significantly better survival than those with increased CA125 at 3 months.Patients with normal values of CA125 at both baseline and 3 months had the best overall survival.Patients without a significant decline in CA125 after 3 months of therapy have a particularly poor prognosis.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Cancer Treatment Centers of America® at Midwestern Regional Medical Center, Zion, IL, 60099, USA. gupta_digant@yahoo.com.

ABSTRACT

Background: We investigated the prognostic impact of changes in serum CA125 levels during the first 3 months of therapy in ovarian cancer.

Methods: A case series of 170 ovarian cancer patients treated at Cancer Treatment Centers of America. Based on CA125 levels at baseline and 3 months, patients were classified into 4 groups: 1) Normal (0-35 U/ml) at baseline and three months; 2) High (>35 U/ml) at baseline, normal at three months; 3) Normal at baseline, high at 3 months; 4) High at baseline and three months. Kaplan Meier method was used to calculate survival across the 4 categories.

Results: Of 170 patients, 36 were newly diagnosed while 134 had received prior treatment. 25 had stage I disease at diagnosis, 15 stage II, 106 stage III and 14 stage IV. The median age at presentation was 54.2 years (range 23.1 - 82.5 years). At baseline, 31 patients had normal (0-35 U/ml) serum CA125 levels while 139 had high (>35 U/ml) levels. At 3 months, 59 had normal while 111 had high levels. Patients with a reduced CA125 at 3 months had a significantly better survival than those with increased CA125 at 3 months. Patients with normal values of CA125 at both baseline and 3 months had the best overall survival.

Conclusions: These data show that reduction in CA125 after 3 months of therapy is associated with better overall survival in ovarian cancer. Patients without a significant decline in CA125 after 3 months of therapy have a particularly poor prognosis.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus