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Altered resting-state connectivity in subjects at ultra-high risk for psychosis: an fMRI study.

Shim G, Oh JS, Jung WH, Jang JH, Choi CH, Kim E, Park HY, Choi JS, Jung MH, Kwon JS - Behav Brain Funct (2010)

Bottom Line: Compared to healthy controls, UHR subjects exhibit hyperconnectivity within the default network regions and reduced anti-correlations (or negative correlations nearer to zero) between the posterior cingulate cortex and task-related areas.These findings suggest that abnormal resting-state network activity may be related with the clinical features of UHR subjects.Neurodevelopmental and anatomical alterations of cortical midline structure might underlie altered intrinsic networks in UHR subjects.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychiatry, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Chongno-gu, Seoul, 110-744, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Background: Individuals at ultra-high risk (UHR) for psychosis have self-disturbances and deficits in social cognition and functioning. Midline default network areas, including the medial prefrontal cortex and posterior cingulate cortex, are implicated in self-referential and social cognitive tasks. Thus, the neural substrates within the default mode network (DMN) have the potential to mediate self-referential and social cognitive information processing in UHR subjects.

Methods: This study utilized functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate resting-state DMN and task-related network (TRN) functional connectivity in 19 UHR subjects and 20 matched healthy controls. The bilateral posterior cingulate cortex was selected as a seed region, and the intrinsic organization for all subjects was reconstructed on the basis of fMRI time series correlation.

Results: Default mode areas included the posterior/anterior cingulate cortices, the medial prefrontal cortex, the lateral parietal cortex, and the inferior temporal region. Task-related network areas included the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, supplementary motor area, the inferior parietal lobule, and middle temporal cortex. Compared to healthy controls, UHR subjects exhibit hyperconnectivity within the default network regions and reduced anti-correlations (or negative correlations nearer to zero) between the posterior cingulate cortex and task-related areas.

Conclusions: These findings suggest that abnormal resting-state network activity may be related with the clinical features of UHR subjects. Neurodevelopmental and anatomical alterations of cortical midline structure might underlie altered intrinsic networks in UHR subjects.

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Related in: MedlinePlus

Task-related areas in which ultra-high risk subjects showed significantly reduced anti-correlations with the posterior cingulate cortex compared to healthy controls. Areas are thresholded at p < 0.001 (uncorrected) and cluster size greater than 50 voxels (highlighted in white).
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Figure 5: Task-related areas in which ultra-high risk subjects showed significantly reduced anti-correlations with the posterior cingulate cortex compared to healthy controls. Areas are thresholded at p < 0.001 (uncorrected) and cluster size greater than 50 voxels (highlighted in white).

Mentions: Task-related or anti-correlated networks (Figures 1 and 2) and between-group differences (Figure 3) are also reported. The TRN areas are similar to previous reports [23,25] and include the DLPFC, supplementary motor area, the inferior parietal lobule, and middle temporal cortex. For the between-group comparison, the bilateral DLPFC, the inferior parietal lobule, middle temporal cortex, and left supplementary motor area are significantly more (i.e., farther from zero) anti-correlated with the PCC in controls than in UHR subjects (cluster-level p < 0.001) (see Figure 5 for details). Healthy controls did not exhibit a significantly reduced anti-correlation compared to UHR subjects.


Altered resting-state connectivity in subjects at ultra-high risk for psychosis: an fMRI study.

Shim G, Oh JS, Jung WH, Jang JH, Choi CH, Kim E, Park HY, Choi JS, Jung MH, Kwon JS - Behav Brain Funct (2010)

Task-related areas in which ultra-high risk subjects showed significantly reduced anti-correlations with the posterior cingulate cortex compared to healthy controls. Areas are thresholded at p < 0.001 (uncorrected) and cluster size greater than 50 voxels (highlighted in white).
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2959003&req=5

Figure 5: Task-related areas in which ultra-high risk subjects showed significantly reduced anti-correlations with the posterior cingulate cortex compared to healthy controls. Areas are thresholded at p < 0.001 (uncorrected) and cluster size greater than 50 voxels (highlighted in white).
Mentions: Task-related or anti-correlated networks (Figures 1 and 2) and between-group differences (Figure 3) are also reported. The TRN areas are similar to previous reports [23,25] and include the DLPFC, supplementary motor area, the inferior parietal lobule, and middle temporal cortex. For the between-group comparison, the bilateral DLPFC, the inferior parietal lobule, middle temporal cortex, and left supplementary motor area are significantly more (i.e., farther from zero) anti-correlated with the PCC in controls than in UHR subjects (cluster-level p < 0.001) (see Figure 5 for details). Healthy controls did not exhibit a significantly reduced anti-correlation compared to UHR subjects.

Bottom Line: Compared to healthy controls, UHR subjects exhibit hyperconnectivity within the default network regions and reduced anti-correlations (or negative correlations nearer to zero) between the posterior cingulate cortex and task-related areas.These findings suggest that abnormal resting-state network activity may be related with the clinical features of UHR subjects.Neurodevelopmental and anatomical alterations of cortical midline structure might underlie altered intrinsic networks in UHR subjects.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Psychiatry, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Chongno-gu, Seoul, 110-744, Korea.

ABSTRACT

Background: Individuals at ultra-high risk (UHR) for psychosis have self-disturbances and deficits in social cognition and functioning. Midline default network areas, including the medial prefrontal cortex and posterior cingulate cortex, are implicated in self-referential and social cognitive tasks. Thus, the neural substrates within the default mode network (DMN) have the potential to mediate self-referential and social cognitive information processing in UHR subjects.

Methods: This study utilized functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate resting-state DMN and task-related network (TRN) functional connectivity in 19 UHR subjects and 20 matched healthy controls. The bilateral posterior cingulate cortex was selected as a seed region, and the intrinsic organization for all subjects was reconstructed on the basis of fMRI time series correlation.

Results: Default mode areas included the posterior/anterior cingulate cortices, the medial prefrontal cortex, the lateral parietal cortex, and the inferior temporal region. Task-related network areas included the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, supplementary motor area, the inferior parietal lobule, and middle temporal cortex. Compared to healthy controls, UHR subjects exhibit hyperconnectivity within the default network regions and reduced anti-correlations (or negative correlations nearer to zero) between the posterior cingulate cortex and task-related areas.

Conclusions: These findings suggest that abnormal resting-state network activity may be related with the clinical features of UHR subjects. Neurodevelopmental and anatomical alterations of cortical midline structure might underlie altered intrinsic networks in UHR subjects.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus