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Walking ability during daily life in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee or the hip and lumbar spinal stenosis: a cross sectional study.

Winter CC, Brandes M, Müller C, Schubert T, Ringling M, Hillmann A, Rosenbaum D, Schulte TL - BMC Musculoskelet Disord (2010)

Bottom Line: No correlations between demographic or anthropometric data and walking ability were found.In everyday practice, objective activity assessment can provide feedback for clinicians regarding patients' performance during everyday life and the extent to which this confirms the results of clinical investigations.The method can also be used as a way of encouraging patients to develop a more active lifestyle.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopedics and Tumor Orthopedics, University Hospital Muenster, Albert-Schweitzer-Str, 33, 48149 Münster, Germany. winterco@uni-muenster.de

ABSTRACT

Background: Degenerative musculoskeletal disorders are among the most frequent diseases occurring in adulthood, often impairing patients' functional mobility and physical activity. The aim of the present study was to investigate and compare the impact of three frequent degenerative musculoskeletal disorders--knee osteoarthritis (knee OA), hip osteoarthritis (hip OA) and lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS)--on patients' walking ability.

Methods: The study included 120 participants, with 30 in each patient group and 30 healthy control individuals. A uniaxial accelerometer, the StepWatch™ Activity Monitor (Orthocare Innovations, Seattle, Washington, USA), was used to determine the volume (number of gait cycles per day) and intensity (gait cycles per minute) of walking ability. Non-parametric testing was used for all statistical analyses.

Results: Both the volume and the intensity of walking ability were significantly lower among the patients in comparison with the healthy control individuals (p < 0.001). Patients with LSS spent 0.4 (IQR 2.8) min/day doing moderately intense walking (>50 gait cycles/min), which was significantly lower in comparison with patients with knee and hip OA at 2.5 (IQR 4.4) and 3.4 (IQR 16.1) min/day, respectively (p < 0.001). No correlations between demographic or anthropometric data and walking ability were found. No technical problems or measuring errors occurred with any of the measurements.

Conclusions: Patients with degenerative musculoskeletal disorders suffer limitations in their walking ability. Objective assessment of walking ability appeared to be an easy and feasible tool for measuring such limitations as it provides baseline data and objective information that are more precise than the patients' own subjective estimates. In everyday practice, objective activity assessment can provide feedback for clinicians regarding patients' performance during everyday life and the extent to which this confirms the results of clinical investigations. The method can also be used as a way of encouraging patients to develop a more active lifestyle.

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Gait cycles per day of patients and control group OAK = Knee osteoarthritis, OAH = Hip osteoarthritis, LSS = Lumbar Spinal Stenosis, CON = Control group, o outlier
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Figure 1: Gait cycles per day of patients and control group OAK = Knee osteoarthritis, OAH = Hip osteoarthritis, LSS = Lumbar Spinal Stenosis, CON = Control group, o outlier

Mentions: Hourly gait cycles were highly correlated with the gait cycles per day (r = 0.95, p < 0.01). Therefore, the analysis of gait cycles per hour did not provide any further information and the volume of activity will be reported as gait cycles per day only. The volume of activity (assessed as gait cycles per day) was significantly lower in all of the patients in comparison with the healthy control group (p < 0.001; Table 2, Figure 1). Patients with knee OA reached 76.4% of the control groups' median values, patients with hip OA 65.3% and patients with LSS 58.2%. There were no statistically significant differences between the patient groups.


Walking ability during daily life in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee or the hip and lumbar spinal stenosis: a cross sectional study.

Winter CC, Brandes M, Müller C, Schubert T, Ringling M, Hillmann A, Rosenbaum D, Schulte TL - BMC Musculoskelet Disord (2010)

Gait cycles per day of patients and control group OAK = Knee osteoarthritis, OAH = Hip osteoarthritis, LSS = Lumbar Spinal Stenosis, CON = Control group, o outlier
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2958990&req=5

Figure 1: Gait cycles per day of patients and control group OAK = Knee osteoarthritis, OAH = Hip osteoarthritis, LSS = Lumbar Spinal Stenosis, CON = Control group, o outlier
Mentions: Hourly gait cycles were highly correlated with the gait cycles per day (r = 0.95, p < 0.01). Therefore, the analysis of gait cycles per hour did not provide any further information and the volume of activity will be reported as gait cycles per day only. The volume of activity (assessed as gait cycles per day) was significantly lower in all of the patients in comparison with the healthy control group (p < 0.001; Table 2, Figure 1). Patients with knee OA reached 76.4% of the control groups' median values, patients with hip OA 65.3% and patients with LSS 58.2%. There were no statistically significant differences between the patient groups.

Bottom Line: No correlations between demographic or anthropometric data and walking ability were found.In everyday practice, objective activity assessment can provide feedback for clinicians regarding patients' performance during everyday life and the extent to which this confirms the results of clinical investigations.The method can also be used as a way of encouraging patients to develop a more active lifestyle.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Orthopedics and Tumor Orthopedics, University Hospital Muenster, Albert-Schweitzer-Str, 33, 48149 Münster, Germany. winterco@uni-muenster.de

ABSTRACT

Background: Degenerative musculoskeletal disorders are among the most frequent diseases occurring in adulthood, often impairing patients' functional mobility and physical activity. The aim of the present study was to investigate and compare the impact of three frequent degenerative musculoskeletal disorders--knee osteoarthritis (knee OA), hip osteoarthritis (hip OA) and lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS)--on patients' walking ability.

Methods: The study included 120 participants, with 30 in each patient group and 30 healthy control individuals. A uniaxial accelerometer, the StepWatch™ Activity Monitor (Orthocare Innovations, Seattle, Washington, USA), was used to determine the volume (number of gait cycles per day) and intensity (gait cycles per minute) of walking ability. Non-parametric testing was used for all statistical analyses.

Results: Both the volume and the intensity of walking ability were significantly lower among the patients in comparison with the healthy control individuals (p < 0.001). Patients with LSS spent 0.4 (IQR 2.8) min/day doing moderately intense walking (>50 gait cycles/min), which was significantly lower in comparison with patients with knee and hip OA at 2.5 (IQR 4.4) and 3.4 (IQR 16.1) min/day, respectively (p < 0.001). No correlations between demographic or anthropometric data and walking ability were found. No technical problems or measuring errors occurred with any of the measurements.

Conclusions: Patients with degenerative musculoskeletal disorders suffer limitations in their walking ability. Objective assessment of walking ability appeared to be an easy and feasible tool for measuring such limitations as it provides baseline data and objective information that are more precise than the patients' own subjective estimates. In everyday practice, objective activity assessment can provide feedback for clinicians regarding patients' performance during everyday life and the extent to which this confirms the results of clinical investigations. The method can also be used as a way of encouraging patients to develop a more active lifestyle.

Show MeSH
Related in: MedlinePlus