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Cutaneous malignant melanoma "recurred as" or "in coexistence" with meningioma?

Rahmah NN, Horiuchi T, Nakayama J, Nitta J, Hongo K - Surg Neurol Int (2010)

Bottom Line: Histological study revealed the intracranial mass to be an atypical meningioma.To our knowledge, this is a rare report of a patient with this tumor occurrence.This case serves to remind neurosurgeons of the potential existence of benign and/ or malignant tumors of neural crest origin.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurosurgery Shinshu University School of Medicine, Matsumoto, Japan.

ABSTRACT

Background: The authors report a rare case of a patient with previously treated cutaneous malignant melanoma that recurred 1 year later as an intracranial meningioma.

Case description: A 20-year-old woman presented with exophthalmos, diplopia and a mass in the left supraorbital area. Imaging study revealed an enhanced intracranial extradural mass with bone destruction. The patient had a history of cutaneous malignant melanoma surgery on the same location 1 year before. The patient underwent left frontotemporal craniotomy for total resection of the mass. Histological study revealed the intracranial mass to be an atypical meningioma.

Conclusion: To our knowledge, this is a rare report of a patient with this tumor occurrence. This case serves to remind neurosurgeons of the potential existence of benign and/ or malignant tumors of neural crest origin.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus

CT scan showing (a, b) precontrast images of extracranial mass of cutaneous malignant melanoma of the left supraorbital area with no bone involvement and (c) strongly enhanced melanoma
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Figure 0001: CT scan showing (a, b) precontrast images of extracranial mass of cutaneous malignant melanoma of the left supraorbital area with no bone involvement and (c) strongly enhanced melanoma

Mentions: A 20-year-old Japanese woman had a history of cutaneous malignant melanoma on the left supraorbital area. Computed tomography (CT) scan showed no bone and intracranial involvement [Figure 1]. Macroscopically, pigmentation was not obvious on the skin covering the cutaneous tumor. Simple resection was carried out to establish the histological diagnosis. The epidermis was left intact for cosmetic reason. Histopathological examination revealed that the tumor was composed of sheet-like proliferation of small round cells which had pleomorphic nuclei and prominent nucleoli [Figure 2]. Occasionally, melanin pigment, which was confirmed by Fontana-Masson staining, was found in the tumor cells. Mitotic figures were frequently found (5/10 HPF), but necrotic foci were not detected. Immunohistochemistry revealed that these tumor cells were moderately positive for S100 protein and focally positive for HMB45, but negative for Melan-A and epithelial membrane antigen (EMA) [Figure 3]. Details of these cell-specific markers are shown in Table 1. MIB1 index was 25.9%. These findings were characteristic of malignant melanoma.


Cutaneous malignant melanoma "recurred as" or "in coexistence" with meningioma?

Rahmah NN, Horiuchi T, Nakayama J, Nitta J, Hongo K - Surg Neurol Int (2010)

CT scan showing (a, b) precontrast images of extracranial mass of cutaneous malignant melanoma of the left supraorbital area with no bone involvement and (c) strongly enhanced melanoma
© Copyright Policy - open-access
Related In: Results  -  Collection

License
Show All Figures
getmorefigures.php?uid=PMC2958332&req=5

Figure 0001: CT scan showing (a, b) precontrast images of extracranial mass of cutaneous malignant melanoma of the left supraorbital area with no bone involvement and (c) strongly enhanced melanoma
Mentions: A 20-year-old Japanese woman had a history of cutaneous malignant melanoma on the left supraorbital area. Computed tomography (CT) scan showed no bone and intracranial involvement [Figure 1]. Macroscopically, pigmentation was not obvious on the skin covering the cutaneous tumor. Simple resection was carried out to establish the histological diagnosis. The epidermis was left intact for cosmetic reason. Histopathological examination revealed that the tumor was composed of sheet-like proliferation of small round cells which had pleomorphic nuclei and prominent nucleoli [Figure 2]. Occasionally, melanin pigment, which was confirmed by Fontana-Masson staining, was found in the tumor cells. Mitotic figures were frequently found (5/10 HPF), but necrotic foci were not detected. Immunohistochemistry revealed that these tumor cells were moderately positive for S100 protein and focally positive for HMB45, but negative for Melan-A and epithelial membrane antigen (EMA) [Figure 3]. Details of these cell-specific markers are shown in Table 1. MIB1 index was 25.9%. These findings were characteristic of malignant melanoma.

Bottom Line: Histological study revealed the intracranial mass to be an atypical meningioma.To our knowledge, this is a rare report of a patient with this tumor occurrence.This case serves to remind neurosurgeons of the potential existence of benign and/ or malignant tumors of neural crest origin.

View Article: PubMed Central - HTML - PubMed

Affiliation: Department of Neurosurgery Shinshu University School of Medicine, Matsumoto, Japan.

ABSTRACT

Background: The authors report a rare case of a patient with previously treated cutaneous malignant melanoma that recurred 1 year later as an intracranial meningioma.

Case description: A 20-year-old woman presented with exophthalmos, diplopia and a mass in the left supraorbital area. Imaging study revealed an enhanced intracranial extradural mass with bone destruction. The patient had a history of cutaneous malignant melanoma surgery on the same location 1 year before. The patient underwent left frontotemporal craniotomy for total resection of the mass. Histological study revealed the intracranial mass to be an atypical meningioma.

Conclusion: To our knowledge, this is a rare report of a patient with this tumor occurrence. This case serves to remind neurosurgeons of the potential existence of benign and/ or malignant tumors of neural crest origin.

No MeSH data available.


Related in: MedlinePlus